Black History Culture : Charles Deslondes: 1811 Slave Revolt: New Orleans, Louisiana.

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Louisiana Gazette and New Orleans Daily Advertiser Thursday, January 10. 1811

    Charles Deslondes Revolt 1811

    Newspaper Report Of The Charles Deslondes Revolt Of 1811

    In 1811, another "largest slave revolt in American history" took place in New Orleans, Louisiana. During this revolt about 500 enslaved Africans, armed with pikes, hoes, axes and a few firearms, marched on the city of New Orleans with flags flying and drums beating. Many of the slaves had participated in the Haitian Revolution. This revolt was led by Charles Deslondes, a mulatto from Saint Dominique, Haiti. They were well-organized and used military formation dividing themselves into companies commanded by various officers. They showed a variety of military formations, but collapsed in combat against a well- armed militia and regular army troops under General Wade Hampton.

    The events were as followed. On January 8, 1811 the rebellion began late in the evening on the plantation of Colonel Manuel Andy located in the German Coast County, some thirty-six miles northwest of New Orleans near present-day Norco. According to contemporary sources the leader of the revolt was a mulatto “a yellow fellow,” probably of Santo Domigan or Jamaican origin. He was the property of the Widow Jean--Baptiste Deslondes at the time of the uprising. Charles Deslondes was in the temporary employment of Colonel Andry or Andre, the sources use alternate spellings of his name.

    Manuel Andry was wounded by an axe to the head by the rebels. His son Andry Jr. was killed and the slaves made their way from the Andry plantation to a prearranged rendezvous with a support group, which included slaves from neighboring plantations, runaway slaves who had been living in the woods, and a large number of “maroon” slaves.

    They began their march along the river toward New Orleans, divided into companies each under an officer, with beat of drums and flags displayed marching toward Trepagnier Plantation. After killing Trepagnier, from this rendezvous point the insurgents move southeast on the River Road toward New Orleans, attacking other plantations along the way, burning several and adding arms and additional recruits. By the following afternoon they had arrived at the Jacques Fortier plantation some “five leagues” distant where they “commenced killing poultry, cooking, eating, drinking and rioting.”

    ...continued...

    COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE: http://slaverebellion.org/index.php?page=newspaper-report-of-the-charles-deslonde-1811
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    A Clever Hero: Slave Revolt Leader Charles Deslondes



    by GUY RAZ


    ....Deslondes was, ostensibly, a loyal slave-driver ... a slave who also oversaw his brutal master's vast plantation.

    Deslondes was feared by slaves and trusted by white plantation owners.

    But all the while, he was plotting…planning and preparing.

    And on the night of January 8, 1811, along Louisiana's German Coast, he led the largest slave uprising in American history.

    500 slaves joined Deslondes and his co-conspirators as they made their way past the plantations along the road to New Orleans.

    This proud battalion of black faces, most dressed in military uniforms, some on horseback, all marching in formation—stunned white New Orleans.

    There were only two possible outcomes for these men of Africa: death or freedom.

    Deslondes and his contingent knew that.

    And in the end, they were outgunned.

    Ninety-five slaves were eventually executed. Deslondes was maimed and tortured beforehand.
    But in death, Deslondes and these other martyrs of American history found their dignity and, of course, their freedom.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/02/11/133684831/A-Tribute-To-Slave-Revolt-Leader-Charles-Deslonde
     
  3. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa,

    .......Great find my sister friend, and most impressive is this: all the while, WoW! Speaks volumes...:bowdown:...the three(3) P's

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