Black History Culture : CAPOEIRA

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by oldsoul, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Capoeira


    Capoeira is a art form, fighting method, self-defense, social struggle, sport, dance,folklore, culture and cultural resistance. It is also music, poetry, party, game, philosophy, and wisdom. Above all, it's a Martial Art and an Cultural and Artistical Expression of the oppressed black people of Brazil, Capoeira represents the quest for survival, freedom, dignity and identity.

    Capoeira is one of the many Brazilian art forms that are a result of the slave trade. Developed as a fight-sport and practiced with the sound of the Berimbau, Capoeira was adopetd by the Brazilian people as its method of self-defense. This physical activity integrates a harmonic sense that provides the capoeirista the suavity of the crane, the agility and the skills of the feline, and the resistance and resilience of the ruminants.

    Capoeira differ from other (Asian) Martial Arts because of the strong African components: the rhythm of the music, the call and response of the songs, and the Ginga, the mobile guard of Capoeira hat resembles dance steps. Capoeira is a delightful sight, fun, relaxing, and empowering.

    Capoeira is not only a method of self-defense; it symbolizes the resistance and the struggle for liberation of the Afro-Brazilians.

    For more: Click Here
     
  2. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you for the info brother OldSoul, I'm interesting in learning more!
     
  3. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I wonder which nation or ethinic group in the continent can Capoeira be traced back to.

    A lot of people from the Congo and Angola were taken to Brazil.
     
  4. PoeticManifesta

    PoeticManifesta Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    :thinking: Caporera.. as seen on "Meet the Falkers"...lol.. yes... very familiar with it
     
  5. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You are correct, Brazil is one of the few places in the Americas which can trace their enslaved Africans to specific countries. My bet would be Angola!
     
  6. Tantrum

    Tantrum Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Information Recieved I have actually never heard of this
    I will have to do some more research on this
    Thank You Brother Old Soul
     
  7. Sodwn2earth

    Sodwn2earth Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I was actually introduced to this art form as eraly as the 5th grade. One of the teachers,( non-black) had been taking classes in it, and decided to share it with us with the rest of her dance class. She also gave everyone an opportunity to join in, which I did. It was fun and not as restrictive as asian martial arts. I enjoyed the music especially.
     
  8. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you brotha Old Soul

    Permit me to post an additional link on Capoiera and the history of African Martial arts.

    THE HISTORY OF AFRICAN MARTIAL ARTS

    African forms of unarmed combat has existed as long as Africans have existed as Homosapiens. That would be over one million yearts. Still, the documented evidence of ancient African martial arts such as wrestling and boxing may be found on ancient cliff or cave paintings dating back to about 30,000 years later or older.

    The earliest text dealing with martial arts in Africa dates back before 2000 years Before Christ. It is a drawing of two Egyptians wrestlilng. One painted extremely black and another painted in a brownish color. This was probablly done to give contrast since the original Khemetic Egyptians were pure Black (meaning they were Negroes with Negro range of complexion of reddish brown to blue-black).

    The fact that wrestling and other types of martial arts can be found on ancient Egyptian papyrus is no great surprise, since the Egyptians had scrolls on every aspect of Egyptian life. They had scrolls on medicine, mathetics, art, music and dancing, religion adn more.

    MARTIAL ARTS AND DANCING GO HAND IN HAND IN AFRICAN CULTURE

    Martial arts and dancing are very important in African culture and have been found for thousands of years. In ancient Nubia, Pharaoh Tarharka who ruled an empire from Kenya to the Assyrian border trained his soldiers in various forms of martial arts and also wrote a book on exercising and keeping fit. Tarharka was the Pharaoh mentioned in the Bible (Book of Kings) who tried to save the Jews from the Assyrians sometime in the 600's B.C.

    Khemetic Martial Arts
    http://www.africanmartialarts.8m.com/
    http://www.africanmartialarts.8m.com

    Throughout Africa today, there are a number of forms of stick fighting combined with hand to feet fighting. One of these forms called "kicking and sticking," found its way to the Southern U.S. during slavery and was still practiced years ago and should be revived. There is also various types of boxing and two of the most popular are bracelet boxing practiced by the Nuba, and Kano Boxing practiced by Africans in Northern Nigeria. In Senegal a combinating of boxing and wrestling is a favorite sport among many. The various forms of martial arts of the Bantu speaking people (500 million people from Nigeria to South Africa) include various types of wrestling, boxing, stick fighting and other forms of combat. Capoiera is a direct resutl of a combination of martial arts skills from the Mende people of West Africa and the Congo-Angola region

    African martial arts were an integral part of the training of African soldiers in ancient times. From Mauritania to South Africa and from Senegal to Ethiopia. African were engaged in a series of wars against the Arabs, Turks, slave raiders, North Africans and among themselves. Both men and women were trained to be warriors. In fact, Dahomey, now called Benin, trained some crack women fighters called Amazons and they were the King's bodyguards.

    Africans captured in many of these wars were about 80 percent of all slaves sent to the Americas. Apart from the wars with slave raiders and nations that sent their agents to provoke or invade African nations, there were the big European colonial powers like Portugal, France, Britain and others who infiltrated many African nations. In Congo-Angola, form the 1500's to the 1800's, a series of wars with the Portuguese occurred during these years, Africans were enslaved enmasse and shipped to Brazil, Mexico, Latin America and the U.S. (many Blacks from Mississippi, through Louisiana to Mexico are of Angolan and Congolese origins) Yours truly included, on both sides of the family

    CAPOIERA WAS KNOWN IN ANGOLA

    Capoiera (Kapwera) was practiced in Angola long before it was brought to Brazil. In fact even today some of the movements found in Capoiera are found in tribal dances in Angola. When the Africans arrived in Brazil, they simply combined what they knew with other African and made a martial art that was formidable.

    Capoiera is an effective martial art and uses many acrobatic moves, tricks, fakes and strikes that are not expected. In capoiera, the idea is to absorb to make the opponents attack "disappear," or become ineffective by being very quick and being able to counter-attack with lightning speed.​

    http://community-2.webtv.net/nubianem2/CAPOIERAANGOLATHE/
     
  9. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Somebody told me the martial arts were first developed in Egypt and then TAUGHT to the Orientals thousands of years ago...along with other arts.

    I actually believe Break Dancing probably would have developed into a form of martial arts if it had survived in our culture.
     
  10. MississippiRed

    MississippiRed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't think break dancing would have ever evolved into a fighting art . Most arts that you see in dance movements started as fighting arts and then certain movements were hidden in dance movements as in Kali and Krabi Krabong and Capoeira....they were fighting arts first and then didn't become dances but had certain parts of the art hidden in the dance movements for various reasons...break dancing however started as a form of dancing know what I'm talking bout..it's hard to explain on the net.......you can't go backwards...it's like reverse evolution...


    MississippiRed
     
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