Black Relationships : Cannot overcome the world anymore

Discussion in 'Black Relationships' started by dustyelbow, Nov 15, 2006.

  1. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    CONQUER. Something that our ancestors were able to ACCOMPLISH a FEAT that is HIGHLY COMMENDABLE is DISAPPEARING in the world of how we RELATE to ONE ANOTHER.

    In actuality in order to CONQUER, you must have VISION.

    I mean if a WHITE PERSON and their FAMILY PROFITED FROM SLAVERY in ANY FORM harmed your ANCESTORS out of KIDNAPPING GREED MURDER and RAPE and TODAY we can LIVE SIDE by SIDE and TALK about the WORLD. Fight side by side too. Work side by side. Call each other names and go home in ONE PEACE. Eat side by side too. Breathe side by side too. Even TRY TO OUTRIGHT MARRY THEM TOO out of NOT KNOWING HISTORY but they sure do got a LOT OF POWER and INFLUENCE.

    No way at looking at it, that is OVERCOMING the PAST for a NEW PRESENT RELATIONSHIP.

    I know that is NOT ALL of US but that is what is in PLAY TODAY.

    Forget that, I am looking at it in the COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVE.

    If you cannot OVERCOME A COMMON SITUATION faced I would say be MILLION + PEOPLE, then WE ALL LOSE OUT as a COMMUNITY and as a NATION.

    Those HARD FEELING might CONDEMN those WHO DID NO WRONG but they LOOK LIKE those WHO DID THE OFFENSE.

    It's ALREADY HAPPENING TODAY.

    With all the PROBLEMS TODAY in the COMMUNITY that goes on RESEARCHERS have put a STUDY on the PROBLEM.

    I know this is a HUSH MATTER but all DEED done in SECRET WILL BE REVEALED.

    Childhood abuse can harm adult relationships
    Monday October 30 2006 16:51 IST
    IANS

    LONDON: Adults who have been victims of child abuse may have a difficult time developing relationships with new people who remind them of their abusive parent, even if only implicitly, says a study.

    Kathy R Berenson and Susan M Andersen, of New York University's Department of Psychology, used groundbreaking methods to study how two groups of adult women, one with a history of childhood abuse and one without, reacted to a stranger whose characteristics were similar to their own parent (or were not).

    The researchers found that for both groups, the participants' feelings about the abusive parent tended to "transfer" to the new person - presumably without the participants realising it, reported portal Medical News Today.

    Both groups of participants reacted to the new person with facial expressions of positive emotion (presumably deriving from love for the parent). Among participants who had been abused, however, this was accompanied by negative reactions as well, such as expectations for rejection, mistrust, dislike, and emotional distancing.

    Notably, no such pattern occurred among abused participants when the new person bore no resemblance to the parent (a control condition).

    Researchers additionally found that the abused participants reported a decrease in negative mood when the new person resembling the parent was also described as explicitly threatening (as compared to when there was no explicit threat). They showed no such response in the absence of parental resemblance.

    "A possible interpretation of this," write the authors, is that this may have evoked, for abused individuals, their "well-practiced affective responses to threat. These individuals may have self-protective strategies that are set into motion when a person acting in threatening ways reminds them of their abusive parent."

    Berenson and Andersen conclude that the process of transference can lead previously abused individuals to use behavioural patterns from their relationship with the abusive parent in later interpersonal relationships, even when such patterns may be inappropriate or ineffective for the current interpersonal situation.


    "The study demonstrated the differences between abused and non-abused participants in their responses to a new person and highlights the pains and pleasures that past significant relationships can bring when experienced in the present," they said in the work to be published in the November issue of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

    The work truly has practical applications for understanding those who live with or treat formerly abused adults.
    ...
     
  2. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Now I PRONOUNCE the word FACIAL EXPRESSIONS.

    We as so called HUMANS use FACIAL EXPRESSIONS without saying a word to get at the MEANING of a SITUATION we FACE.

    Now SCIENCE said they are INHERITED too.

    Study finds facial expressions are inherited

    That means that those FACIAL EXPRESSION could MAKE or BREAK a POTENTIAL RELATIONSHIP even if they COME AT A COST not of the MAKING of the POTENTIAL PERSON or STRANGER whether for FRIENDSHIP, NETWORKING, COMPANIONSHIP, etc.

    ALOT is at STAKE.

    Oh well.
     
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