Black People Politics : Burkina Faso: Dictator Blaise Compaore Declares State Of Emergency

Discussion in 'Black People Politics' started by UBNaturally, Oct 30, 2014.

  1. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The head of Burkina Faso’s armed forces, General Honoré Traoré announced the creation of an interim government

    October 30, 2014

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    AFRICANGLOBE – Burkina Faso’s dictator and puppet of France Blaise Compaore has imposed a state of emergency after massive protests at his bid to extend his 27-year dictatorship.
    The government and parliament have been dissolved, and an overnight curfew has been declared across the country.

    Protests to demand Mr Compaore’s resignation are continuing in the capital, Ouagadougou.

    Angry crowds had earlier set fire to the parliament and other government buildings.

    This forced MPs to abandon a vote aimed at allowing Compaore to seek re-election in 2015.

    ‘Barbaric Escalation’

    The main opposition leader, Zephirin Diabre, told a local radio station that the state of emergency was unacceptable.

    “We are calling on the people to show that they are against it. The resignation of President Blaise Compaore is the only thing that can bring peace to the country,” he is quoted as saying.



    The head of Burkina Faso’s armed forces, General Honoré Traoré, on Thursday announced the dissolution of the National Assembly as well as the creation of an interim government, which would lead the country for 12 months.

    Traoré did not specify, however, who would be in charge of the new government.

    He made the announcement shortly after President Blaise Compaoré issued a statement read on local broadcaster Radio Omega FM stating that he had dismantled the government and declared the country in a state of emergency, with the chief of the armed forces in charge of implementing the decision.

    upload_2014-10-30_20-12-54.png

    Recently reported on how there has been mining ongoing in Burkina Faso for some time in the last decade. As of 2006, companies exploring for gold in Burkina Faso include Goldrush Resources, Gryphon Minerals Ltd, Orbis Gold Limited and Golden Rim Resources (2010) of Australia, Cluff Gold plc and Randgold Resources Ltd. of the United Kingdom, and Canadian companies Channel Resources Ltd., Etruscan Resources, Goldbelt Resources Ltd., High River Gold Mines Ltd., Orezone Gold Corporation., Riverstone Resources Inc., and Societe Semafo. Etruscan also explores in Burkina Faso for copper.


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    http://pulitzercenter.org/reporting...old-child-labor-the-rock-crushers-larry-price
     
  2. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    why don't these guys ever want to transfer power?
     
  3. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Oct 22, 2014

    (Reuters) - Opposition parties in Burkina Faso accused President Blaise Compaore on Wednesday of preparing a "constitutional coup d'etat" and called for nationwide protests against moves to remove a two-term limit for the presidency.

    Opposition leader Zephirin Diabre urged people across Burkina Faso to close market stalls and walk out of private and public sector jobs on Oct. 28 to mark the beginning of a civil disobedience campaign to prevent a referendum being organized.

    "Burkina Faso's political opposition reiterates its rejection of a referendum," Diabre said. He accused the government of preparing to pay off members of the National Assembly to vote in favor of a referendum.

    Compaore has not publicly said he wants to stand for re-election but his party has. The proposed constitutional revision has raised political tensions in the cotton and gold-producing nation of 17 million people, living on the edge of the Sahara.
     
  4. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    More background...

    Burkina Faso’s “West African Spring”
    Large pro-democracy demonstrations in Burkina Faso have largely escaped the Western media’s radar.

    February 26, 2014

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    Since January, tensions have flared between Burkina Faso’s authoritarian government and pro-democracy activists. (Photo: Agence France-Presse)


    Sustained anti-government rallies in Thailand, Ukraine, and Venezuela have captured the attention of millions. But large pro-democracy demonstrations in Burkina Faso last month largely escaped the Western media’s radar.

    Since January, tensions have flared between the West African country’s authoritarian government and the impoverished masses yearning for democratic reforms. Depending on how developments unfold, the protests in Burkina Faso could serve as a catalyst for further uprisings in the region.

    On January 18, over 10,000 Burkinabe citizens rallied in the nation’s capital, Ouagadougou (WAH-gah-DOO-goo), and other cities to protest the concentration of political power in one man — President Blaise Compaore, who has ruled Burkina Faso since 1987. While Compaore claims democratic legitimacy, the opposition demands his departure from power, maintaining that Compaore’s past electoral victories were fraudulent and rigged.

    The demonstrators, led by opposition leader Zephirin Diabre, have taken to the streets to protest Compaore’s plans to revise Article 37 of the country’s constitution. This provision, incorporated in 2000, limits the president to two five-year terms. After winning presidential elections in 2005 and 2010, Compaore’s final term is set to end in 2015. Although Compaore has issued no official statement concerning his intention to seek another term, his critics contend that he is laying the groundwork for a constitutional amendment to extend his rule beyond 2015. Calling January 18 a “historic day,” Diabre declared that the thousands of protestors were “taking a stand in this free and republican protest to send Compaore into retirement in 2015.”

    Compaore’s failure to improve living standards for average Burkinabes also factors into popular resentment of the government. Despite being rich with gold reserves, Burkina Faso remains one of the world’s poorest countries. Nearly half of the 18 million citizens who inhabit this landlocked nation live below the poverty line, and GDP per capita hovers around a paltry $1,400. Fewer than 30 percent of adults are literate and the nation’s infant mortality rates rank ninth globally. Recurring floods and droughts in recent years have exacerbated all of these dismal conditions.

    The perception that Compaore’s cronies in power have usurped the nation’s resource wealth at the public’s expense has further fueled the opposition’s determination to end his presidency.

    Historical Tensions

    Compaore’s reckoning reflects tensions that have accumulated gradually since the country’s independence.

    Burkina Faso’s Cold War experience was marked by violent instability. Following its independence from France in 1960, power changed hands frequently through a series of bloody coup d’états, including a Marxist-inspired revolution in 1983 that installed the Communist leader Thomas Sankara as president.

    Sometimes likened to “Africa’s Che Guevara,” Sankara implemented radical social reforms, ranging from efforts to abolish gender inequality to the collectivization of agricultural land. He even renamed the republic, replacing its previous name (Upper Volta) with its current name, Burkina Faso, or “Land of Upright Men.” Such reforms drew some support from the poorer sectors of society, but they also created enemies among the economic elite.

    Under Sankara’s leadership, Burkina Faso faced numerous challenges on the international stage. Burkina Faso and Mali went to war during December 1985 in a conflict referred to as the “Christmas War.” The brief war resulted from a territorial dispute between the two countries over a 100-mile-long portion of desert, rich with minerals, referred to as the Agacher strip. Both militaries engaged in aerial bombings before a truce was reached.

    More generally, Sankara pitted Burkina Faso against the interests of Western superpowers and their African allies. Sankara was an outspoken opponent of South Africa’s apartheid system and military raids against the African National Congress (ANC) in Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Additionally, the Burkinabe leader expressed solidarity with the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and Nicaragua’s Sandinistas. Burkina Faso’s ties with Libya and Ghana prompted the United States and France to fear that the “Burkinabe model” would spread throughout Africa. From 1983 to 1990, Paris canceled foreign assistance to Ouagadougou.

    On October 15, 1987, Sankara was killed in a coup that the United States, France, and Liberia are widely suspected of helping to orchestrate. Blaise Compaore, who served in the upper echelons of Sankara’s government and was a childhood friend of Sankara himsef, was one of the major leaders behind the coup. Compaore continues to deny that Sankara’s death was intentional.

    Compaore moved quickly to undo many of the social reforms of Sankara’s government, working to build a neoliberal economy that was integrated into the global marketplace. Burkina Faso returned to its former colonial master France for international support as opposed to countries like Cuba or the Soviet Union. These reforms allowed the country to export its ample natural resources and created a stable political climate for investment. But they also allowed for the enrichment of a small elite, which stoked a growing resentment of the privileged governing class.

    Burkina Faso and Washington

    Western capitals have eyed the current protests warily, viewing Burkina Faso as a strategic ally in the post-9/11 era. Certainly, the country’s stability contrasts markedly with the ethnic conflicts, insurgencies, and civil wars that have destabilized the Central African Republic, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone, among other countries.
     
  5. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Army takes over control of nation
    Col Isaac Zida claims presidential powers


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    A second military officer appears to have taken power in Burkina Faso, a third leader for the West African state in 24 hours.

    Colonel Isaac Zida said he had assumed the powers of head of state, and called on the international community to recognize his authority.

    Earlier, army chief General Honore Traore said he had taken over.

    President Blaise Compaore stood down after 27 years in power amid political unrest on the streets of the capital.

    He fled the country and has now arrived in Yamoussoukro, the capital of neighboring Ivory Coast.

    A violent Thursday saw protesters set fire to parliament and government buildings in the Burkinabe capital Ouagadougou.

    At least three people were killed, though opposition leaders said dozens had died.

    But on Friday crowds danced and cheered in the streets after Mr Compaore's resignation was confirmed.

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    His fall was prompted by an attempt to amend the constitution and extend his long hold on the presidency.

    Under the country's constitution, the president of the Senate should take over after the national president resigns, with elections taking place between 60 and 90 days afterwards.

    However, in the hours after Mr Compaore's resignation Gen Traore told reporters he would assume the presidency until elections were called.

    According to Francis Sanon, who protested near the parliament on Thursday: "This is all nonsense. It is us, the people, who overthrew Blaise Compaore, not the army. We are going to watch what they are doing, and if we don't agree with the new leader, we will be back out on the street."

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    Now this is how to protest against government oppression...
    Target the government bodies (not sporting events, not movie theaters, not convenient stores)

    Want some real attention, walk up into the city hall, council meetings, military bases, airports and the house of the head of state and run the "proclaimed enemy" out of town.


    But now that the military has control for now, things could get a bit chess gamey.

    Burkina Faso’s President Blaise Compaoré resigned from office after 27 years in power and a week of escalating protests (see our background report). He appeared to hand power to General Honore Traoré, head of the Burkinabé Army, his former aide-de-camp, and called for elections within 90 days. While the elections point is in line with the Constitution, the transfer to the military is not, nor was the subsequent dissolution of the legislature.

    Update: Part of the problem appears to be that the position identified in the constitution as the successor does not exist due to an ongoing fight over the actual creation of a Senate required by amendments to the constitution.


    Looks like they will be starting from scratch... why do I sense "terrorism alerts" coming from Burkina Faso soon? Let's hope not, but these story lines tend to repeat and use the same scripts.
     
  6. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thomas Sankara - the Upright Man



    Thanks to oldsoul for presenting more about this brother
     
  7. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    ...



    Burkina Faso recalls 10 ambassadors linked to ousted leader


    ... Most of the recalled diplomats had served as ministers or senior officials under former president Blaise Compaore, who stepped down last October over mass protests against his bid to extend his 27-year grip on power ...


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    Interim President of Burkina Faso Michel Kafando arrives in Abuja, Nigeria, on December 15, 2014 (AFP Photo/Pius Utomi Ekpei)

    http://news.yahoo.com/burkina-faso-recalls-10-ambassadors-linked-ousted-leader-224255128.html

    ...

     
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