Black People : BROTHER SEKHEMU AND BLACKBIRD...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I understand that you brothers are from the LOUISIANA AREA... Where 'bout??? I have been trying to study maps of the area - particularly the African areas of the city, and would that you could give us some insights on the layout of the Ninth Ward, for example... I have heard about neighborhoods like BYWATER and ALGIERS, and I'm wondering if you could give me some of the flava of those communities, what do they look like, are they working class or middle class, or a combination of the two...

    I regard New Orleans as one of THE most important cities in the WORLD, because it is one of the MECCAS of high culture, our culture... What would the world look and feel like had not Africans in America created JAZZ and the BLUES on that fertile soil??? Who in the world would even go to NEW ORLEANS had it not been for the AFRICANS who made it a place to go, and to be??? Now, they've got our culture, and wanna chase us out(smile!) As Curtis Mayfield once said, "Freddy ya shoulda known betta..."

    Anyway, like OldSoul pointed out in his post on the 1927 flood in Greenville, Mississippi, there's a precedence for this behaviour... We should not be surprised by this... But let us glory in our beauty, that essential BLACKNESS which can never be taken away from us!

    Give us the rundown uncut, brother Sekhemu - and then let's go get our tickets and gone on down there and reclaim our people's legacy... Somebody say Destee's family reunion on the SACRED SOIL where our ancestors went back to the earth that gave us all life???

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    wassup brother Isaiah, long time no read.

    u gots me thinking man, i wonder how much a lot or an acre is going for in those black lands in the N.O. i mean were all sitting around talking bout pink man is up to his old tricks yet how many people are getting up on that cheap land. if all of us at destee through some change could we purchase a lot or two?
    I mean here in hampton roads they got lots in black areas of norfolk going for like $8,000-$10,000!

    peace world
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    OT: did you get the images i sent you to look at?
     
  4. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks for asking brotha,

    My people are primarily from Vicksburg and Indianola Mississippi, in the heart of Delta country. A few relatives of mine moved to New Orleans in the 1930's. I'm not too familiar with the 9th ward, bywater and algiers, both of them may very well be the area surrounding the french quarters. One thing I do know is that black people living in these areas are the poorest in the city, and suffered tremendously.

    I regard New Orleans as a mecca of the world too, for the very same reasons you've mentioned, as well as being a center for African Root workers. Jazz/blues and root working go hand in hand, in fact I'd dare say jazz/blues are by and large a result of root working.

    Blackbird, can probably give you more insight to the demographics and history of the 7th and 9th wards, but here is a link I looked up that may start the ball rolling.

    http://www.gnocdc.org/orleans/7/19/people.html
     
  5. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  7. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Brother Sekhemu, good lookin', man!(smile!)

    I didn't know Bywater was a parish(interesting name), I thought it was merely a neighborhood in St Bernard Parish... I was looking at the news one night, and over across from Bywater, on the other side of the canal and Lake Ponchartrain, is Jefferson Parish, where mostly White folks live... They were shown standing on crates and chairs looking over the high levee wall on that side of NEW ORLEANS over at Bywater... Jefferson Parish was not hit by any floodwater, and was bone dry on a nice sunny day... I had to laugh, because all of those folks who talk about conspiracy theories just cannot deny the "coincidence" that really don't seem like no coincidence...(smile!)

    BTW, they made it their business to interview the lone Black Woman at the LEVEE on the Jeff Parish side... Sister said she'd once lived over on the other side, and had relatives over there...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  8. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Mr. T, wassup, brotherman!(smile!)

    Nice to hear from ya, good brother! Yes, we should go up in there, and demand from NAGIN, and his white friends some prospectuses of the land so we can buy it all up, and move brothers and sisters back up in there... That should be high priority for Black AMERICA, to get our people back on their land...

    The deal is, the city has a grid of where all the houses were, all the streets were, and there should be no confusion about where Africans(67%) lived, and should return.. brothers and sisters need to understand that... We must remember that those houses in NEW Orleans, unlike Gulfport and Biloxi, are still standing...


    Peace1
    Isaiah
     
  9. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Once More, a Neighborhood Sees the Worst

    By Manuel Roig-Franzia
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Thursday, September 8, 2005; Page A18

    NEW ORLEANS -- The Lower Ninth Ward crouches behind a pile of dirt, separated by a big bend in America's biggest river and a thick canal and eons of tradition from the "high-class people" up on the high ground over in the French Quarter. They keep piling the dirt higher, pushing the levee up and up over the years, but the water keeps coming into the Lower 9.

    This place -- an archetype of New Orleans African American culture dotted by tiny corner groceries called "superettes" and laundromats called "washaterias" -- is still now, eerily still. This poorest of neighborhoods, which gave the world Fats Domino and hosts during Carnival season the "second-line" parades, with their high-stepping funk groove, is almost completely under the water that Hurricane Katrina pushed into the city.

    What isn't underwater is coated with a mud so thick and gloppy and black that it could have been produced only on the banks of the Mississippi. New Orleans is a counterintuitive place, and so is the Ninth Ward: The streets closest to the river stay driest and drain fastest because the ground is higher there, and the ruined houses have the small consolation of being glazed now by caked dry mud instead of the wet stuff.

    The dead, and many of the living, are elusive. The dead because they are underwater, or tucked silently into flooded homes; the living because they are willing to hide in order to stay
    CLICK WEBSITE BELOW FOR MORE...


    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/07/AR2005090702127.html


    Very interesting history of the BYWATER area(it is not a parish, but a community within the Ninth Ward of St Bernards' parish), along with a description of landmarks, cultural venues, and the people... Pictures included for those sick and tired of reading about this thing - and I am!(smile!)


    One note is that in my reading about the Ninth Ward/BYWATER is that I get the clear feeling that it, and its Black residents, are regarded in the same way as we in Bedford Stuyvesant, Harlem, Chicago's Southside, or any Black community in America, as violent misfits whom the whites are glad to be rid of... In interviews I read of New Orleans white residents, however, not one said they'd ever visited, nor knew anyone from the community(smile!) Clowns, man, clowns all...(smile!) By the way, in addition to sister Charmaine Neville, Fats Domino, and a number of entertainers are residents of Bad *** ByWater... Eat dat white boys!(smile!)


    http://www.gnocdc.org/orleans/7/19/snapshot.html


    New Orleans will rise again

    City has overcome history of disasters

    By S. Frederick Starr
    NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE

    September 11, 2005

    Sitting safely in Washington, D.C., I am watching harrowing footage shot from helicopters above the Ninth Ward of New Orleans, submerged under 14 feet of water when the Mississippi thundered through the breached levee at the Industrial Canal and destroyed everything in its swirling waters.

    My home is there, a West Indian-style plantation house built in 1826, standing as an ancient relic amid a maze of wooden houses a century younger. Some are classic bungalows, but most are distinctly New Orleans building types, with fanciful names like shotguns and camelbacks.

    I watch as a neighbor is rescued from his rooftop. Dazed, he has emerged from his attic, wriggling through a hole he hacked in the roof, swooped up by a guardsman on a swinging rope. He is safe. Scores of others aren't. Bodies float through the streets of the Ninth Ward. Presumably they are from the diverse group that inhabits this deepest-dyed old New Orleans neighborhood: poorer blacks and whites, Creoles of color and a sprinkling of artists.

    Until Hurricane Katrina hit, our Ninth Ward was a neighborhood on the way up.

    When I bought the forgotten Lombard Plantation 16 years ago, it was surrounded by a 15-foot cyclone fence to fend off drug dealers selling cocaine in the nearby port. Murder was common. My father was convinced I was mad to buy it, even at the grand price of $110,000. But then a few brave artists began fixing up houses a few blocks away. They persuaded the city to give the neighborhood an antiseptically modern name: Bywater.

    Gradually crime declined, and housing prices soared, at least by the modest standards of New Orleans real estate.

    Happily, most of the old inhabitants stayed on. I recall more than a few cases of the newcomers helping their older neighbors paint their houses. As this happened, a wonderfully textured community emerged, embodying the best of new and old. Bywater even developed its own neighborhood celebration, the annual Mirliton Festival, named not for the dance in the second act of Tchaikovsky's "Nutcracker" but for the locally grown squash that Creole cooks transform into a spicy treat.

    Bywater was a model of humane and organic urban revitalization. (It even acquired a motto, emblazoned on signs painted by a local artist: "Be nice or leave.") Until Katrina, that is.

    New Orleans also faces the loss of some of America's most notable historical architecture. Maybe not in the French Quarter, which may emerge relatively intact, or the Garden District, which was spared most of the flooding.

    The dangers lie in neighborhoods like Treme and Mid-City, which extend along Bayou Road toward Lake Pontchartrain and are rich in 18th-and 19th-century homes, shops, churches and social halls. They have been badly hit by the violent winds or torrents of water. And so have hundreds of other important buildings and vernacular structures throughout the city and across the breadth of South Louisiana and the Gulf Coast.

    I think, for example, of the 220-year-old Destrehan Plantation along the River Road, a living record of Louisiana's complex and conflicted history, only recently reclaimed from near-ruin by the state, under the supervision of Eugene Cizek, a Tulane architectural preservationist. The news reports that all of Destrehan is deep under water.

    Or what about the wonderful mix of grand homes and well-proportioned freedmen's cottages along Bayou Lafourche, or the old wooden farmsteads in Louisiana's so-called Florida parishes, which stood close to Katrina's ruinous path?

    Heritage like no other

    Louisiana, especially South Louisiana, is a living archive of American social and cultural history, and not just in its buildings. In no other state is the proportion of people born and raised within its borders so high. As a consequence, they are something that is ever more rare in a homogenized and suburbanized America: the living bearers and transmitters of their own history and culture. Katrina, and those fateful levee breaks in New Orleans, put this all at risk.

    I am pondering what I will do with my own piece of Louisiana's heritage. For six years, I have used my academic salary to work with Jack Stewart, a local master builder, to restore the Lombard Plantation. His craftsmen include Pierre Trudeau, a descendant of the free black who surveyed the land back in the early 1800s, and the Clesi brothers, descended from the large Sicilian immigration that so enriched New Orleans life after that group's arrival in the 1870s.

    By August we were almost done. The house breathed a lost age, when New Orleans was the northernmost outpost of the Caribbean world, and when a New Orleanian, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, was composing music that anticipated ragtime and jazz by 70 years. So evocative was the ancient house that Disney was considering it as a set for a feature film starring Denzel Washington. Just before the storm, 20 Disney cameramen, sound and light people, and set designers looked over the place. Their decision, if favorable, would have paid for the final steps in my six-year adventure.

    Now the Lombard Plantation is under water. If it survives at all, it will need massive rehabilitation. Just as likely, it will go the way of hundreds of other pieces of the region's heritage.

    But I do not intend to give up easily. Why? Because I am absolutely convinced that New Orleanians will not allow their city to become a ghost town. And I intend to be part of the renewal that springs from this determination.
    CLICK WEBSITE FOR MORE....


    http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20050911/news_1h11katrina.html

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  10. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sorry for Delay

    Greetings all and nsala malecum,

    Pardon my delay... My wife used to live in the Lower Ninth Ward on Forstall St and we were concerned about her car, a Ford Escort. LOL! It's probably floating up the Mississippi by now. If you see it, you can call us @..... N'all, but seriously, I was busy checking back home making sure my people and loved ones were safe and in fairly decent spirits. Most of my folks left before Katrina hit, but a few couldn't make it out in time. However, I report all is well with me and mine. My cousin got out after Katrina hit because he didn't have any transportation set up for his family. I happily state my cousin was seen driving a brand new 2005 Lincoln Navigator and has relocated to somewhere in Texas in a purchased home.

    I'm in Las Vegas, unfortunately, and have been going through some other issues lately so I haven't been able to be on the frontlines like I want to, but my wife and I have been coordinating our own local efforts in the form of clothes, toiletries, and etc. We have independent people we are working with on the ground back home that are transcribing "our family's" stories, assisting with identifying various social services/educational resources, and other additional services that can be provided.

    The Ninth, like so many places in New Orleans (New Or-leens), is home to a predominately Black, undereducated, service-industry population. Most of my family lives in New Orleans East which was another hard hit area, with the same demographic situation. I believe stating New Orleans is 60-70% Black is a big understatement. Most visitors to New Orleans, especially those without any family connection, only see the French Quarter, the Garden District, and parts of Uptown. Most never been to the Lower Nine, Bywater and other places populated by folks like us.

    Although, I'm from Shreveport, Louisiana nearly 300 miles northwest of the N.O. and presently Louisiana's second largest city with a population of 300,000 (predominately poor Black majority as well), my family came from New Orleans and my heart is and will always be with N.O. with it's magificent chronicles of our history - Congo Square, Mardi Gras Indians, second-line jams, funeral marches and Friday night burials....

    Oh, by the way, Bywater is an area in New Orleans. Orleans is the parish and I'm from Caddo Parish.

    Blackbird
     
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