Black History Culture : Broadside Press

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Oct 30, 2013.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
    Dudley Randall's Life and Career

    Naomi Long Madgett
    [​IMG]Poet, publisher, editor, and founder of Broadside Press. Dudley Randall was born 14 January 1914 in Washington, D.C., but moved to Detroit in 1920. His first published poem appeared in the Detroit Free Press when he was thirteen. His early reading included English poets from whom he learned form. He was later influenced by the work of Jean Toomer and Countee Cullen.
    His employment in a foundry is recalled in "George" (Poem Counterpoem), written after encountering a once vigorous coworker in a hospital years later. His military service during World War 11 is reflected in such poems as "Coral Atoll" and "Pacific Epitapns"v (More to Remember).
    Randall worked in the post office while earning degrees in English and library science (1949 and 1951). For the next five years he was librarian at Morgan State and Lincoln (Mo.) universities, returning to Detroit in 1956 to a position in the Wayne County Federated Library System. After a brief teaching assignment in 1969, he became librarian and poet in residence at the University of Detroit, retiring in 1974.
    His interest in Russia, apparent in his translations of poems by Aleksander Pushkin ("I Loved You Once," After the Killing) and Konstantin Simonov ("My Native Land" and "Wait for Me" in A Litany of Friends), was heightened by a visit to the Soviet Union in 1966. His identification with Africa, enhanced by his association with poet Margaret Esse Danner from 1962 to 1964 and study in Ghana in 1970, is evident in such poems as "African Suite" (After the Killing).
    When "Ballad of Birmingham," written in response to the 1963 bombing of a church in which four girls were killed, was set to music and recorded, Randall established Broadside Press in 1965, printing the poem on a single sheet to protect his rights. The first collection by the press was Poem Counterpoem (1966) in which he and Danner each thematically matched ten poems on facing pages. Broadside eventually published an anthology, broadsides by other poets, numerous chapbooks, and a series of critical essays. These publications established the reputations of an impressive number of African American poets now well known while providing a platform for many others whose writing was more political than literary....

    COMPLETE HERE: http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/m_r/randall/life.htm
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Ballad of Birmingham
    BY DUDLEY RANDALL
    (On the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963)
    “Mother dear, may I go downtown
    Instead of out to play,
    And march the streets of Birmingham
    In a Freedom March today?”

    “No, baby, no, you may not go,
    For the dogs are fierce and wild,
    And clubs and hoses, guns and jails
    Aren’t good for a little child.”

    “But, mother, I won’t be alone.
    Other children will go with me,
    And march the streets of Birmingham
    To make our country free.”

    “No, baby, no, you may not go,
    For I fear those guns will fire.
    But you may go to church instead
    And sing in the children’s choir.”

    She has combed and brushed her night-dark hair,
    And bathed rose petal sweet,
    And drawn white gloves on her small brown hands,
    And white shoes on her feet.

    The mother smiled to know her child
    Was in the sacred place,
    But that smile was the last smile
    To come upon her face.

    For when she heard the explosion,
    Her eyes grew wet and wild.
    She raced through the streets of Birmingham
    Calling for her child.

    She clawed through bits of glass and brick,
    Then lifted out a shoe.
    “O, here’s the shoe my baby wore,
    But, baby, where are you?”

    http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175900
    Dudley Randall, “Ballad of Birmingham” from Cities Burning. Copyright © 1968 by Dudley Randall. Reprinted with the permission of the Estate of Dudley Randall.

    Source: Cities Burning (Broadside Press, 1968)
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The plot arc of "Ballad" is purposefully succinct: a quick montage of images from the bombing's aftermath follows with an atmospheric sound-wash, setting the mood for the song and the accompanying video. The goal is to create a new media 'tone-poem.'

    For more on this project, including information on the original soundtrack, visit: http://balladofbirmingham.org/
     
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