Health and Wellness : BREAK THROUGH IN HYDROGEN FUELS

Discussion in 'Black Health and Wellness' started by Kemetstry, Apr 9, 2015.

  1. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Hydrogen fuel breakthrough could pave the way for clean cars

    Christian Science Monitor
    Joseph Dussault


    [​IMG] © Virginia Tech Dr. Percival Zhang (right) and Dr. Joe Rollin in front of their device.
    A new breakthrough in fuel production could put hydrogen cars back in the race for clean transportation.
    Researchers from Virginia Tech have developed a way to drastically cut the time and money necessary to produce hydrogen fuel. By using discarded corn cobs, stalks, and husks, they have improved on previous methods deemed too inefficient by energy experts. Their research, which was funded in part by Shell, was published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .
    “This means we have demonstrated the most important step toward a hydrogen economy – producing distributed and affordable green hydrogen from local biomass resources,” lead author Percival Zhang said in a press release.
    Hydrogen is by far the most abundant element, making up about three quarters of the entire universe. In its gaseous form, it is also an incredibly clean fuel. It is combustible – just like gasoline – but instead of carbon dioxide, it produces only energy and water. And we already have the technology to harness hydrogen fuel – many major auto companies have prototype and commercial hydrogen cars, and the first (very primitive) hydrogen internal combustion engine was developed over 200 years ago.
    But hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an energy source. Pure hydrogen gas doesn’t occur naturally on Earth, so it needs to be separated out of hydrogen-based compounds, such as water. Running an electrical current through water will release free hydrogen gas – but the process, called electrolysis, is usually too expensive to be considered practical. Certain microbes can separate hydrogen fuel out of decaying biomass, but only in tiny amounts. So while they look great on paper, hydrogen engines trail behind their electric counterparts in practice.
    But Virginia Tech’s new method could change that. Corn “stover” – which includes the cobs, husks, and stalks – decays into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Using genetic algorithms, Dr. Zhang and co-author Joe Rollin developed an “enzymatic pathway” that speeds up this reaction. By including two simple plant sugars, glucose and xylose, they were able to increase the rate of hydrogen production while emitting an “extremely low amount” of carbon dioxide.
    Cost effective and productive in volume, this method could breathe new life into the hydrogen car. Biomass relies on readily available (and usually discarded) material, which reduces initial fuel costs. The method also increases the reaction rate three times over – as such, the fuel can be produced in smaller, gas station-sized facilities, further driving down cost. These facilities could be stationed alongside processing plants, potentially spurring local industries.
    “We believe this exciting technology has the potential to enable the widespread use of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles around the world and displace fossil fuels,” Rollin said.
    Whether it can make hydrogen fuel commercially viable remains to be seen – the team plans to scale up before estimating the wider costs of their method. But Zhang and company have cleared a major obstacle in the path to renewable fuel.
    This article was written by Joseph Dussault from Christian Science Monitor and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.





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  2. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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  3. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Look forward to seeing the advancements in hydrogen technology.
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/tech/hydrogen

    Hydrogen Energy
    [​IMG]
    NASA uses hydrogen fuel to launch the space shuttles. Credit: NASA
    Hydrogen is the simplest element. An atom of hydrogen consists of only one proton and one electron. It's also the most plentiful element in the universe. Despite its simplicity and abundance, hydrogen doesn't occur naturally as a gas on the Earth - it's always combined with other elements. Water, for example, is a combination of hydrogen and oxygen (H2O).

    Hydrogen is also found in many organic compounds, notably the hydrocarbons that make up many of our fuels, such as gasoline, natural gas, methanol, and propane. Hydrogen can be separated from hydrocarbons through the application of heat - a process known as reforming. Currently, most hydrogen is made this way from natural gas. An electrical current can also be used to separate water into its components of oxygen and hydrogen. This process is known as electrolysis. Some algae and bacteria, using sunlight as their energy source, even give off hydrogen under certain conditions.

    Hydrogen is high in energy, yet an engine that burns pure hydrogen produces almost no pollution. NASA has used liquid hydrogen since the 1970s to propel the space shuttle and other rockets into orbit. Hydrogen fuel cells power the shuttle's electrical systems, producing a clean byproduct - pure water, which the crew drinks.
     
  5. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    People are already predicting the oil industry will wipe them out





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