Pan Africanism : Brazilian Influence on Lagos

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Amnat77, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ****ta Mosque along Martin Street was built by Joao (Juan) Baptist da Costa who was second only to Francisco Nobre, the best of the Brazilian masons.


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    Colonial Lagos was a busy, cosmopolitan port, reflecting Victorian and distinctively Brazilian architecture and the varied backgrounds of a black elite, composed of English-speakers from Sierra Leone and of emancipated slaves repatriated from Brazil and Cuba. Its residents were employed in official capacities and were active in business. Africans also were represented on the Lagos Legislative Council, a largely appointed assembly.

    In 1841, Oba Akitoye ascended to the throne of Lagos and attempted to ban slave trading. Lagos merchants, most notably Madam Tinubu (died 1887), resisted the ban, deposed the king and installed his brother Oba Kosoko.

    While exiled, Oba Akitoye met the British, who had banned slave trading in 1807, and attained their support to regain his throne. A British naval attack on Lagos in 1851 reinstalled Akitoye as the Oba of Lagos.


    Southwestern Nigeria was inhabited as early as 9000 B.C.E., according to archaeological evidence. The earliest identified Nigerian culture is that of the Nok people who thrived between 500 B.C.E. and 200 C.E. on the Jos Plateau in northeastern Nigeria. Information is lacking from the first millennium C.E. following the Nok ascendancy, but by the second millennium C.E., there was active trade from North Africa through the Sahara to the forest.

    Yoruba fishermen and hunters settled Lagos Island by the late 15th century, calling the island Oko. From the late sixteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century the Kingdom of Benin dominated the area, calling it Eko.

    Portuguese explorer Rui de Sequeira visited the area in 1472, naming the area around the city Lago de Curamo.

    From 1404 to 1861, Lagos served as a center of the slave trade, ruled over by Yoruba kings called the Oba of Lagos. The slave trade, which peaked in the 18th century, disrupted indigenous cultures, resulting in the emergence of new political, economic, and cultural structures.

    Colonial Lagos was a busy, cosmopolitan port, reflecting Victorian and distinctively Brazilian architecture and the varied backgrounds of a black elite, composed of English-speakers from Sierra Leone and of emancipated slaves repatriated from Brazil and Cuba. Its residents were employed in official capacities and were active in business. Africans also were represented on the Lagos Legislative Council, a largely appointed assembly.

    In 1841, Oba Akitoye ascended to the throne of Lagos and attempted to ban slave trading. Lagos merchants, most notably Madam Tinubu (died 1887), resisted the ban, deposed the king and installed his brother Oba Kosoko.

    While exiled, Oba Akitoye met the British, who had banned slave trading in 1807, and attained their support to regain his throne. A British naval attack on Lagos in 1851 reinstalled Akitoye as the Oba of Lagos.


    http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Lagos
     
  2. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Brazilian-lagosians circa 1949-

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  3. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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