Black Parenting : BODY ODOR IN CHILDREN

Discussion in 'Black Parenting' started by MsInterpret, May 5, 2013.

  1. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My daughter is 9 and is getting funkier every time I see her...Being that this is my only child, these transitions she goes through is all new to me...even though I was younger and most likely went through this as well, I don't remember...so I figured I'd share this information to other parents whose children are turning into TWEENS.

    BODY ODOR IN CHILDREN

    If your child is developing body odor[​IMG], it's not necessarily cause for concern. As a child matures, her hormones begin to change, and she naturally begins to develop the bacteria that cause body odor. When she sweats and the sweat dries on her skin, the combination of bacteria, dirt and sweat can result in body odor.
    Time Frame

    Many young grade schoolers require deodorant, notes pediatrician Jennifer Shu. Although a 5-year-old is unlikely to develop body odor, a child older than the age of 8 is a candidate. Shu further notes that it is entirely normal for children between 8 and 12 years of age to develop a need for deodorant.
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    Effects

    Body odor is one of the earliest stages of puberty. It isn't a sign that menses is starting or that your son's voice will change. It is, however, a sign that physical changes are coming, although they may still be months to years away. For most parents, this provides a window of opportunity to discuss puberty in more detail with your maturing child to help prepare your child for changes to come.
    Considerations

    Children might be caught unaware by this change, which can lead to playground embarrassment. If your child sweats[​IMG] heavily or is involved in a sport, make sure she bathes daily and wears clean clothes to school. Although she may have a favorite sweater, check it discreetly before she wears it a second time to avoid any potential problems. Wash her towels and sheets regularly, too, to minimize any potential odor.
    Misconceptions

    Dr. Shu notes that for most children, regular bathing and even avoiding certain foods, such as those laden with spices, onions or garlic, can help. But for some children, it's time to apply deodorant on a regular basis. It should be a mild deodorant and not an antiperspirant; children still need to sweat to be healthy. In addition, antiperspirants may cause skin irritation, making it difficult for children to adopt the habit of using it daily.
    Warning

    Although body odor is generally a sign that puberty is starting, it can also be a sign of a medical condition. Metabolic disorders, in which the body cannot metabolize certain enzymes, can cause body odor. So can some parasites, such as ringworm. Also, hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating[​IMG]) can cause body odor in some children. If your child isn't near puberty and is experiencing body odor, take her in for a check-up with her pediatrician to rule out a medical condition.


    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/74538-body-odor-children/#ixzz2SRmu8EUj
     
  2. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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    it's interesting also that the kids don't notice the smell until they are made aware that it is something to be considered negative. I've been to other countries also where what we call "body odor" is just considered the smell of people.

    anway.. one thing I've been sure to do with my sons is to make sure they understand the whole cleaning process. Many people believe soap to be some sort of magic potion that cleans you on contact.. and that you just put it only and rinse it off and you're clean. But children need to understand that it is the water and a coarse towel that actually cleans you. And the soap is mostly just a deodorant.. so scrubbing with that towel is important.. especially to African American kids who use lotion on a daily basis.. as that lotion will build up on the skin.

    and also.. as kids get older their bathroom time becomes more and more private.. but it's important to get in there and show them how to clean themselves properly even at 10, 12, 14 years of age.. if you don't show them, they really won't know. Nakedness embarasses many people but as parents it's our job to instruct our children in all things for their benefit.
     
  3. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Yup...

    I find it hard to get my daughter into a bath...It's a challenge...She is so used to having 3 baths a weeks...But I'm trying to get her into the shower because it's also quicker.

    Today, she was standing next to me and I had to tell her to wash herself and apply some deodorant. She also is now on her school's track team so now it's even more important to wash up.

    And I have to remind her that her friends will smell her and say things about her odor.

    There are other things that are coming about, as well as her odor...and it's all happening so fast.
     
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