Black People : Bob Marley and African Americans

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Aluku, May 24, 2012.

  1. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Being from the Caribbean I'm very aware of Bob Marley and I always wondered why he wasn't more widely accepted by African Americans.

    He made popular the Afro centric conscious music in our part of the world. He was always puzzled why he wasn't more accepted in the US by AA's. The white kids loved & still do love him. Not sure if they really understood his message, but I think they just liked the fact that he smoked weed.

    My question is why do you think he wasn't more accepted among AA's?

    Here is one of his songs:

    Crazy Baldheads(baldhead is slang for whites):

    (He used the phrase I and I to signify the oneness he felt for the African Diaspora)

     
  2. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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    what is the basis for your knowledge on how widely Bob Marley has been accepted by African Americans? meaning.. how are you judging how widely he has been accepted by Africans in America.. and also by white kids?
     
  3. Ms Drea

    Ms Drea STAFF STAFF

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    Aluku, thanks for bringing this particular song forth. I'm an avid Bob Marley song listener and this one was new to me. My favorite song is "Redemption Song", occasionally I even try to sing it with his accent.
    Love & Blessings,
    DREA
     
  4. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Maybe posthumously but during his lifetime he wasn't. He said so himself, based I guess on the audience of his concerts, and his airplay on urban radio stations.
     
  5. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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    Is this really a question.. or is it just another condescending poke from another outsider critic of Africans in America? really.. your whole premise is suspect.. and I won't make a big thing of it.. let me just say this:

    Bob Marley was and is Hugely popular and widely and fully accepted by whole generations of Africans in America. The music of Africans in America was a huge influence on Bob's own musical development.. There was a mutual respect and resonance there that emanates from a common source.

    And I'll leave it at that.

    -peace
     
  6. Zim

    Zim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This might sound like a poke so I'm going to put on my AA shield for this one. Could it be because AA's are somewhat Arrogant when it comes to music?

    Before you go on one hear me out; In a way African-Americans kind of held the flame and could be called the torch bearers when it comes to African/Diasporan music.

    Even Jamaican music which is original in its own right has taken heavy influence from African-American music.

    In-fact Jamaican and AA music have always been alongside one another kind of complementing each-other in a way from then all the way down to hip hop.

    I'm of Jamaican Descent and I know when it comes to music AA and Jamaican is most popular throughout the world so Continental Africans And other Caribbeans step you game up - lol!

    I think Bob Marley was loved around the world though. I can't really comment to what extent with AA's because I don't really know - only African Americans that remember those days can comment on that I guess. Lauryn Hill?

    The music of Jamaica includes Jamaican folk music and many popular genres, such asmento, ska, rocksteady, reggae, dub music, dancehall, reggae fusion and related styles. Jamaica's music culture is a fusion of elements from the United States (rhythm and blues and soul), Africa, and neighboring Caribbean islands such as Trinidad and Tobago (calypsoand soca). Reggae is especially popular through the international fame of Bob Marley. Jamaican music's influence on music styles in other countries includes the practice of toasting, which was brought to New York City and evolved into rapping. British genres asLovers rock and jungle music are also influenced by Jamaican music.
     
  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    It's that time of the solar cycle which is why my ignore list is at a new high.

    Peace!
     
  8. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Being from the Caribbean you might be more aware of Bob Marley because Bob Marley is also from the Caribbean which means greater exposure.

    Do you know how the music industry works? It is based on regional culture. If one travels across the different regions across the united states and listen to the radio you experience this.

    Bob Marley might not have been greatly accepted in the united states because reggae is a limited market in most united states regions. My exposure to his music came at an early age because our family business was African import and restaurant and we played a diversity of Black music to attract customers. My Dad personally favored Jimmy Cliff who was popular because of the movie The Harder They Come. Bob Marley remains one of my favorite musicians. Reggae music is not widely circulated on the airwaves. Mostly on college and public radio stations here such as KCRW and KPFK.

    White people for years have dominated the music industry and reggae is no exception. The booking agents. The DJs. The label executives. The clu owners and most importantly the distributors. I am fortunate to have lived through the growth of both reggae and hip hop as a musician, DJ, and event organizer. In Los Angeles back in the 70s the first DJ I remember using the sound system approach was a white DJ, the DJ Ron miller who was based in Santa Monica. A white boy with two tables and a mic spinning reggae, dub and version. In new York it was DJ Kool herc who was from Kingston. In England it was dub poetry with linton kwesi Johnson and mutabaruka. Hip hop on the west coast began as a mix of all these styles because at house and block parties we played a mix of them all along with R&b and some jazz at the time like Roy ayers and the blackbyrds.

    I worked with a collective known as uhuro communications that hosted several programs on KPFK such as family tree which exposed the region to reggae. I had a friend who was one of the first DJs on the original reggae beat on KCRW. On the west coast bob marley and the wailers were hugely popular because we also have a popular Ethiopian American community and business district.
     
  9. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This thread is too divisive. African Americans have the right not to like black music from another part of the world, just like people from Africa can choose not to like African American music. I love reggae (and Carribean music in general due to cultural affinity as a creole) but I don't like rap that much except for the likes of Tupac, Dr Dre and Coolio.
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Unless you actually live here you are in no position to judge because you don't really know what musical genres we are exposed to.

    Most if the black people I know live reggae but that's not what this thread is about. It concerns Bob Marley and I have never heard any black person that I know state they do not like his music.

    Play some Bob Marley at a family reunion or community event and little kids start dancing on impulse because that's what his music was even without lyrics. Pulsating, natural rhythm with layers of horns and synths.
     
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