Black Education / Schools : Blacks Take Education Into Their Own Hands

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by Destee, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Blacks take education into their own hands
    New ground: Once dominated by whites, homeschooling appeals to more African Americans


    Leslie Fulbright, Chronicle Staff Writer

    Monday, September 25, 2006

    Benjamin Marshall works the graveyard shift so that he ca... Benjamin Marshall and his wife, Tanya, homeschool their c... Homeschooling Attracts Diverse Families.

    Suisun City parents Benjamin and Tanya Marshall are part of a new homeschooling movement led by African American families fed up with the public school system.

    Nine years ago, the couple put their oldest son, Trevaughn, in kindergarten after discussing teaching him at home. When he had a substitute teacher several times in his first six weeks, they pulled him out.

    "We felt like it wasn't the right environment, especially for an African American boy," said Tanya Marshall, 36. "The teachers were young and nervous. Black males were not being challenged and ending up in special ed."

    Trevaughn, now 14, has been taught at home ever since. The couple also homeschools their two younger sons, 11 and 9, and their daughter, 12.

    "We wanted to be the main and driving influence in our children's lives," said Benjamin Marshall, 37. "We didn't want them socialized with marijuana smokers and pregnant teens."

    The Marshalls, who had both worked as teachers' aides, feared public school would contradict their Christian beliefs, and they wanted to avoid having their sons labeled as violent or hyperactive or seeing them pressured by peers to drink, do drugs and have sex.

    A desire for more rigorous academics and greater emphasis on black history also has led black families into homeschooling, educators say.

    Although homeschoolers often are stereotyped as white and evangelical Christians, in 2003 about 9 percent of homeschooled students were black, and 77 percent were white, compared with a total student population nationwide that was 16 percent black and 62 percent white. Homeschoolers numbered 1.1 million in 2003, compared with about 49.5 million students in public and private schools, according to the most recent federal statistics from the U.S. Department of Education.

    The numbers of black and white homeschoolers rose about a third from 1999 to 2003 to encompass about 1.3 percent of U.S. black students and 2.7 percent of whites. Researchers say the number of black parents who are homeschooling their children may now be growing even faster.

    More than half the students who are homeschooled come from families with three or more children, and more than one-quarter from families making less than $25,000 in 2003, when the nation's median family income was $56,500. More than half of homeschooled students came from families making between $25,000 and $75,000. Among black, white and Latino students, Latinos are least likely to be homeschooled, at less than 1 percent in 2003; no other ethnic groups are measured.

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    Destee
     
  2. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I couldn't agree with them more , while some feel peers are good
    i think they not as good surrounding because they should be focus
    on the subject of class , they there for learning .....I really thinking hard on Homeschooling
    my kids and grandchildren maybe i can instill in them better respect / morals
    while giving them the education i think they need and yes history public /private
    schools just don't teach.

    This was a great article that has push me more to doing it.
     
  3. mrron

    mrron Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This article made some very interesting points, especially the one about the income level of those homeschooling their kids. It's the same old story, the poorer neighborhooods get the worst public schools. My kids were brought up in a very small town, population of around five thousand. So all the schools were the same, and there was only one high school. They received a pretty good education, but the town was ninety percent white, so they didn't get any black history in school. During every summer, they were required to get up at six in the morning on weekdays and study black history as well as the subjects they had trouble with in school. So they had both public school and home school. I'd be weary of children who don't get to socialize daily with their own peer group, they might get the three R's, but they will be lacking in social skills.
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Not necessarily. If parents who home-school also make sure that their children are interacting with other children their ages, especially outside of family members, they will not lack social skills.

    Getting your children involved in sports or other extra-curricular activities even when home-schooled will teach them "team-work" and other interpersonal skills that will serve them in life.

    Parents who home-school just have to be careful of not over-protecting their children by keeping them at home all the time or only with family and extended friends of the family. Children need to know how to interact with other children who do not come from their own socio-economic background or religious affiliation. When they get out into the "real" world, they will encounter all kinds of people, so they should be prepared so it won't be a culture shock for them and overwhelm them.
     
  5. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I agree to all of what you are saying here , but the public school system
    just not cutting it for our youth/ children and the rate of drop-outs are
    on the rise and been for some time .....
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Yes, but part of the responsibility for that drop-out rate lies with parents who do not place an importance on education, organizational skills, respect and discipline.

    Too many of our children grow up with a problem dealing with authority figures. This is reflected in schools and in the work place. They think NOBODY is supposed to tell them WHAT to do, HOW to do it, and WHEN to do it.

    They have felt entitled and been ENABLED in that entitlement for so long that when they get out in the REAL world, they have work place conflicts just as they did in school.
     
  7. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I couldn't agree more with that because it's true we know it start within the home
    and boils over into the school system could it be because we are having babies and
    still a baby ourselves ???

    so many young teens having children and don't know how to parent a child
    is this how we have falling so far off from what many of us old skol folkz learned
    and know !

    I wonder if better teaching at home how to respect and accept authority would make
    a different in the over all life ....would they learn more and accept school is a need ?
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    :bingo:

    And also breaking the cycle of neglect. Too many parents hold to the mindset, "Well, nobody did it for me." They don't even know how to nurture and protect a child.
     
  9. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    blacks take education...

    when parents decide to teach thier children at home it's a tremendous undertaking and i take my hat off those those that do,but if i may interject something here,while the history of our people is very important we mustn't lose sight of the importance of being well rounded that is learn about as much as you can about as many different things and people as you can.
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    This isn't about "home-schooling" specifically but it is about taking an interest/participation in a child's education.

    One of my favorite movies is an old tv feature "The Vernon Johns Story."

    In one scene, he is helping his daughter understand fractions. I think he used an orange to teach her. When she got it wrong, she had to eat the slices.

    The daughter said that she grew sick of oranges but she learned fractions! LOL!

    But, in many ways, that IS "home-schooling!" :lol:
     
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