Black History Culture : Blacks Serving In the White House

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Alonzo Fields. When Alonzo Fields first started working at the White House in 1931, he discovered there were “separate dining rooms—black and white. We all worked together, but we couldn’t eat together. . . . Here in the White House, I’m working for the President. This is the home of the democracy of the world and I’m good enough to handle the President’s food—to handle the President’s food and do everything—but I cannot eat with the [white] help.”

    Book cover: My 21 Years in the White House, 1961. Coward-McCann
    The real 'Butler': Alonzo Fields served 4 presidents

    Will Higgins, The Indianapolis Star​
    12:02 a.m. EDT August 19, 2013​


    When Juanita Hudson first heard about the movie Lee Daniels' The Butler, a story of a black man who was a White House butler for decades, she thought the film might be about her uncle, Alonzo Fields.
    For good reason, too, because Fields, who worked in the White House from the Hoover to Eisenhower administrations, was the first African-American to be promoted to chief butler. The Indiana native wrote a book, My 21 Years in the White House, and later was the subject of a one-man theater show, Looking Over the President's Shoulder, that played to audiences nationwide.
    continued.....http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/08/19/butler-alonzo-fields/2666199/

     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    White House staff, 1877. Taken during the Rutherford B. Hayes administration, this is the earliest known posed photograph of workers at the White House. This group was supplemented by additional staff—both African American and white—including ushers, valets, gardeners, coachmen, stable hands, and messengers.

    Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center
     
  3. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Margaret 'Maggie' Rogers (1874–1953) was a housemaid at the White House who served for 30 years (1909–1939), during the administrations of Taft, Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, and part of Franklin D. Roosevelt's, eventually rising to head housemaid.
    Her years of service were memorialized in the book My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House by her daughter, Lillian Rogers Parks, who worked as a seamstress, also in the White House. The story was later produced as a miniseries by Ed Friendly Productions.
    Emmett Rogers, Jr., Margaret’s son, was a U.S. serviceman who was gassed in World War I and had to retire to Arizona for his health.

    Lillian Rogers Parks (February 1, 1897 – November 6, 1997) was an American housemaid and seamstress in the White House.
    With the journalist Frances Spatz Leighton, co-author of a number of White House memoirs, Parks published My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House. The book covers a 60-year period in the life of domestic staff in the White House. It reports Parks's experiences as a seamstress, and those of her mother, 'Maggie' Rogers, who served as a housemaid for thirty years.[1] Many of the gifts she received (revealed in the aforementioned book) from presidents during her time there later became notable artifacts and collectibles associated with presidential history, eventually ending up in the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection. She also published The Roosevelts: a family in turmoil in 1981 in collaboration with Frances Spatz Leighton.

    Backstairs at the White House (1979)

    TV Mini-Series - 540 min - Drama | History








     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    As Malcolm X once said:


    Of all our studies, history is best qualified to reward all research ...

    @ 15:12 ... Message To The Grass Roots - Malcolm X


    Enki



     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.whitehousehistory.org/whha_exhibits/working_whitehouse/d1_community-of-workers_b.html

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    White House workers at Smithsonian festival, 1992. In 1992, as part of the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival (formerly the Festival of American Folklife), the Smithsonian Institution’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage invited retired White House workers to the National Mall for a series of panel discussions on their occupational culture. Shown here (left to right) are moderator Worth Long, Lillian Rogers Parks, Alonzo Fields, Eugene Allen, Armstead Barnett, and Samuel Ficklin.

    Photo by Richard Strauss, Smithsonian Institution
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Clara Richardson, maid, 1966. Clara Richardson dusts some of the dolls collected around the world by Lynda Bird Johnson, President Lyndon B. Johnson’s daughter.

    White House Historical Association
     
  9. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Thanks cherryblossom,



    This information allows me to appreciate Mr. Obama as President in the Oval Office, even the more.

    We built it, we keep it serviced, and now, finally, we have a black resident and black family in it to ...

    :welcome:
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Dolly Johnson in the White House kitchen, c. 1902

    In 1889, Dolly Johnson came from Louisville, Kentucky, to serve as chief cook​
    for President Benjamin Harrison.​
    Her immediate predecessor, Madame Madeleine Pelouard of France, was known​
    for her haute cuisine, but several newspapers of the time​
    deemed Johnson’s cooking more suitable for the president’s “plain American taste.”​

    Photo by Frances Benjamin Johnston; Library of Congress

     
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