Black Women : Black Women's Contribution to New Orleans

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by NNQueen, May 30, 2006.

  1. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The following are a few excerpts from this interesting information:



    Read more here...http://www.loyno.edu/history/journal/1985-6/doherty.htm
     
  2. FLATFOOTFLOOGIE

    FLATFOOTFLOOGIE Banned MEMBER

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    Whoa, NNQueen, I have mixed emotions about that article. Black women's contributions to New Orleans, according to this writer, seems to have been based on their allowing crackas to come into the slave quarters at night. Sorry, but that just disgusts me.
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Louisiana Black Women: An Ignored History

    by Jan Doherty

    There is an aspect of the history of Louisiana that has been essentially neglected. The role of women, particularly the contributions of the black woman, is all but eliminated in the texts that attempt to outline the achievements of explorer, governor, and merchant in the development of Louisiana. Historian Gerda Lerner notes that "the modern historian is dependent on the availability of sources. The kind of sources collected depends to a large extent on the interests, prejudices and values of the collectors, archivists and historians of an earlier day." <1>

    This observation was also made by W. E. B. DuBois in 1951 when he wrote, "We have the record of kings and gentlemen ad nauseam and in stupid detail, but of the common run of human being . . . the world has saved all too little of authentic record and tried to forget or ignore even the little saved." <2>

    Such has been the case with the role of women in history. Arthur Schlesinger Sr. wrote in 1922 that "from reading history textbooks one would think half of our population made only a negligible contribution to history." <3> The black woman has been ignored even more; she has been considered historically inferior to the white female in the United States and at the same time a member of an entire family of people that was considered little more than chattel for more than 200 years.

    "None of the names of the first women in New Orleans have survived. They have left no written history.... ut we can imagine how hard life was for the early French women who kept house and raised families in the fetid swamp, the Indian women who brought their wares to market or the African women sold on the slave blocks to serve local wealthy families or work on plantations upriver." <4> When Sieur de Bienville brought 300 men to build the city of New Orleans in 1718, 272 were bachelors. For this reason, some of the Native American women were sold to whites and lived a quasi-slave existence in their own homeland.

    In the 1720s French girls who were in disfavor with their families or who were orphans, prisoners or inmates from asylums were shipped to Louisiana. Whether "correction girls" or "casket girls," their primary purpose was to satisfy the sexual desires of the French settlers. As a further insult, the commissaire ordonnateur, Jean Baptiste de Bois Duclos, logged an official complaint to the Company of the West for a 1713 shipment of 12 young women who were "too ugly and ill-favored" to marry. <5>

    As New Orleans became established as the slave center of North America, black women by the thousands were sold into bondage. For one group of the women, the assigned price depended upon their beauty and subsequent use to the master who could lease them to wealthy white men. For another group of slaves, bondage meant learning that "white men considered every slave cabin a bordello." <6>

    complete here: http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1985-6/doherty.htm
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Quadroons for Beginners: Discussing the Suppressed and Sexualized History of Free Women of Color with Author Emily Clark
    Posted: 09/04/2013

    "As a historian, I knew that mixed race women and interracial families were everywhere in America from its earliest days. And I knew that most of the free women of color in antebellum New Orleans bore no resemblance to the quadroons of myth." - Dr. Emily Clark

    As an American, I follow my roots like trails across the globe. My mother is from Kansas and is of German descent, and my deceased father was black with roots in North Carolina, and before then, Africa. Arguably you can trace all of us back to Africa. But my parents' union created me: a black American woman, a woman of color, a mixed kid, a mulatta, maybe an Oreo, definitely a myriad of identities and categories to embrace or resist.

    Living in Harlem, I see so many mixed marriages, mixed kids everyday all the time. Traveling the South, I see so many kids with the telltale curly locks. Growing up in Metro Detroit in the 80s, I knew there were other black & white mixes like me. I just didn't know them. Only at college in Washington, DC, did I meet mixed girls and have them as friends. And not until my English, women's studies, and African-American history courses did I learn any American history about women like me.

    Before college, maybe I'd encounter a definition of "miscegenation" - that very special crime of racemixing in segregated America. And maybe an explanation of the "one drop rule" that went on to create the classifications of "mulatto" and "quadroon" and "octaroon"--your label dependent upon which fraction of African was in your genealogy. But that was it. In my high school American History texts, I don't remember any acknowledgement of centuries of rape and consensual relationships between whites and blacks. None of my suburban history teachers lingered on the taboo. Maybe I didn't either. When I think of the mania around racemixing, and of the cultural trope of the "tragic mulatta"--the woman doomed because she is too white for the blacks, too black for the whites--it was easy to assume that the history of mixed-race women in America was simple in its sadness and injustice.......continued... http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stacy-parker-aab/quadroons-for-beginners-d_b_3869605.html
     
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