Black Women : Black Women In History

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by oceolo, May 5, 2005.

  1. oceolo

    oceolo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When people in this country discuss history they usually only talk about white people and when they talk black history they usually talk about men neglecting many of the contributions to this country made by our women. What black women in history do you admire the most? Harriett Tubman , Mary McLeod Bethune and Madame C.J. Walker to name a few.
     
  2. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    The sad thing is this:

    We have brothas and sistahs that made such a BIG impact, yet we are too low in confidence to believe that we have gifts either just like, or better than they have had. I will be willing to bet that God gave some random human being the ability to make a difference, yet they are not using it.

    Bottom Line - It is just sad how people talk about how good out leaders were and how they achieved greatness; yet nobody wants to say, "Just like King, I will earn a Nobel Peace Prize!" Or just like Harriet Tubman, "I will put myself on the line JUST to free us as a people!" WE HAVE THOSE CAPABILITIES; we just are not using them.

    CD
     
  3. Ralfa'il

    Ralfa'il Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Cedric

    This is a little off topic but I have to agree with this statement.

    We keep looking to the past for dead saviors instead of producing and supporting quality leadership in our present community.

    Oprah Winfrey would be akin to Madame C.J. Walker.

    Maxine Waters is another excellent example of black female leadership and success.

    I also consider Deloris Tucker and her efforts to clean up the music industry a valuable asset in our community.
     
  4. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is an excellent topic brother Oceolo!

    The women I most admire in history are Nanny of Jamaica, the leader of the Maroon community which won its freedom from the British. Queen Nzinga of Angola, who fought of the colonization efforts of the Dutch & Portugal. Harriet Tubman, and her efforts with the underground railroad. Ida B. Wells, and her campaign against lynching. Lastly I most admire my own mother (of course)!
     
  5. karmashines

    karmashines Banned MEMBER

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    All of these women are admirable but I would have to say my favorite is Madame C.J. Walker.
     
  6. yaphet al-wynn

    yaphet al-wynn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ida C Wells or Ida B Wells. Oprah could have portrayed her. A lost oppotunity. Offtopic-Oscar Micheaux.
     
  7. oceolo

    oceolo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have to take issue with Deloris Tucker .She was just an opportunist who tried to gain a job in the music industry when she appeared to be disgusted with rap lyrics.
     
  8. Ralfa'il

    Ralfa'il Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    OC

    Respect

    So do you think she was/is a hypocrite, or are you also against her effort to clean up hiphop of it's irreverence and immorality?

    Personally I don't think there's anything wrong with being an opportunist.
    Perhaps she wanted to gain entry into the industry with the intention of making a change for the positive.

    Perhaps she just wanted to get paid.

    Regardless....she has a right to do for self.
     
  9. oceolo

    oceolo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    There have documentaries about this where people who were in the middle of this situation tell of how she was just interested in making money off this so called public rebuke of rap lyrics so she probably didnt really care one way or the other about rap lyrics after all. It was even said that she would call off this public campaign if ahe got a job.
     
  10. Ralfa'il

    Ralfa'il Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    OC

    Respect

    I don't know about all that...

    It may be true, it may not be but she is one of the few people willing to take a public stand against the filthy and degenerative lyrics of entertainers like the Late Tupac, 2 Live Crew and others.

    I think she's a remarkable black woman.

    Who cares if she's out for money...it's the effect that she will have that counts in my book.

    If she can clean up the industry and prevent the downward spiral of our youth, in my humble opinion she's worth every dollar she can get from it.

    I have respect for both her and Rev. Calvin Butts for their efforts in bringing to attention the self-imposed genocide we call "gangst rap".
     
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