Black Women : Black Woman, White Movement: Why Black Women are Leaving the Feminist Movement

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by Liberty, May 24, 2016.

  1. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The Women’s Liberation movement fought to bring hardships of womanhood to light; from suffrage rights to income inequalities, the movement has, and is, continually addressing issues that inhibit women to live a fully free life. However, fragmentation within the women’s movement, specifically between Black and White women, has contributed to the rapid decline of the movement and hindered the effectiveness of a shared collective identity. According to
    Black Feminist scholar Barbara Smith, the Black Feminist movement focused on reproductive issues, equality in healthcare prevention of sexual harassment, and other pertinent issues. Unlike the White feminists, Black feminists are actively fighting against structural and institutional racism.

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    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lindsay-hoffman/black-woman-white-movemen_b_8569540.html
     
  2. Hermetic

    Hermetic going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    All of what the sisters are fighting for is righteous, but they should have known that a white organization would only be concerned with white issues. The white feminists wanted the numbers that women of color could bring, but only in support of their power struggle with white men. White feminist do not want equality with their men, they desire superiority. With them in charge, the system would not change. The figurehead of white supremacy would just be white women instead of white men.
     
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  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Speaking for myself, I've never felt the need nor had the desire to ever join a movement led by white women, and sad to say, I'm skeptical of Black women that do. Some of us can be very naive and easily fooled.

    If you understand our history, why would any rational thinking person do such a thing? White women, if they are honest, clearly understand the privilege that their white skin gives them in a patriarchal society led by white men. When they look at me, they do see skin color, as do I when I look at them. There is no color blind society, in my opinion.

    "Despite this strong support for woman’s suffrage, black women sometimes faced discrimination within the suffrage movement itself. From the end of the Civil War onwards, some white suffragists argued that enfranchising women would serve to cancel out the “Negro” vote, as there would be more white women voters than black men and women voters combined. Although some black club women participated actively in the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), the NAWSA did not always welcome them with open arms. In the 20th century, the NAWSA leadership sometimes discouraged black women’s clubs from attempting to affiliate with the NAWSA. Some Southern members of NAWSA argued for the enfranchisement of white women only. In addition, in the suffrage parade of 1913 organized by Alice Paul’s Congressional Union, black women were asked to march in a segregated unit. Ida B. Wells refused to do so, and slipped into her state’s delegation after the start of the parade.

    When the 19th Amendment was passed in 1920, it legally enfranchised all women, white and black. However, within a decade, state laws and vigilante practices effectively disenfranchised most black women in the South. It would take another major movement for voting rights – the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s – before black women in the South would be effectively enfranchised."

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  4. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  5. Inanna

    Inanna Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    black folk do got some gender issues however that needs to be addressed by sisters.....and brothers
     
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