Black Positive People : Black Power: Former Anti-Apartheid activist buys entire Mcdonald's operation in S. Africa

Discussion in 'Black People Doing Positive Things' started by Knowledge Seed, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    In March this year, American fast food giant McDonald’s (nyse: MCD) announced that it had sold off its South African operations to Cyril Ramaphosa, one of the country’s most influential and politically-connected businessmen. The deal was finalized just last Thursday, even though financial specifics of the sale are still under wraps.

    The deal will grant Ramaphosa 20-year control of the fast food giant’s South African operations, including the exclusive powers to lease out real estate of its over 130 outlets spread throughout the country.

    But why did McDonald’s sell off? Ever since the fast food giant launched its operations in South Africa in 1995, it has struggled against intense competition from home-grown food chains such as Famous Brands, which owns popular restaurants like Steers, Wimpys and Debonairs Pizza.

    Giving reason for the chain’s less–than-stellar performance in South Africa, Anthony Hamms, a Johannesburg-based Private Equity analyst said: “South Africans generally tend to prefer home-grown, locally-owned companies to foreign ones. Since McDonald’s was not locally owned, I think we generally preferred to go with other alternatives. But with Mr. Ramaphosa on board now, I’m pretty sure McDonalds will do extremely well. He’s got the Midas touch in business. Very soon, McDonald’s will turn to gold.”

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  2. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Allegory of the School Presentation

    On a familiar visit, I learned that a cousin in high school was preparing her school presentation at the request of a disagreeable teacher. At my next visit, she told me of that presentation. The details were enlightening: She stood before the classroom, in the teacher’s manners; she presented a worthless topic, in the teacher’s manners; and though her friends were her audience, she reprimanded the student out of disrespect, in the teacher’s manners. By and by, she was a disagreeable teacher, just as her teacher was. This taught me that unless we as a people adopt our own customs, no amount of power will solve our problems: for we will necessarily adopt the customs of those with whom we disagree.​

    I wrote this today. How apt! The indigenous South Africans try to keep their economy local, but against the masses' will, one South African, in pursuit of money, will push for a continuance of foreign domination. How pitiful. That this is masqueraded as Black Power is all the more depressing.
     
  3. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That "local economy" is dominated by non-Blacks. Don't believe me? Look at the Board of Directors for Mcdonald's largest competitor in South Africa.
     
  4. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    A lot of White faces in White places (exception Bheki Sibiya). That's to be expected. But our ancestors threw off White oppression. Not because it was White but because it was oppression.

    I can sympathize with one who 'gives up on the fight' and 'joins the White men' simply because I can see how unrewarding 'the fight' is. Nevertheless, I won't raise it as "Black Power" to "empower" Whites. That's simply not any sort of power that I endorse. You may endorse differently, but I don't.
     
  5. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is indeed a positive story. I'm all for black ownership even if it's partial ownership! We as a people need to move from consumers to producers! That's where the real power is.
     
  6. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This guy is what you call a cynic. He finds nothing positive to say. When blacks achieve something positive, this frustrates him. Shame I wasn't log in as usually I cannot see his posts.
     
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