Black People : Black Native American Nations

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Knowledge Seed, Mar 21, 2008.

  1. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Are there any Black Native American Nations still in existence?
     
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It depends on what you mean by the term?

    Blackbird (A Black Ndn)
     
  3. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What I mean is are there that were not killed of by invaders? I've heard of the Wa****aw(In Louisiana) Nation and the Azizan Moorish Nation, but are there any others? Are the two listed above REAL nations or are they just common law groups?
     
  4. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    They are common law groups, if that. The Wa****aw Nation is highly questionable and its origins are dubious. I have come in contact with them when I lived in Louisiana and know that the Empress is doubtful. My colleague once spoke with her son when the Feds was searching them for mail fraud and money laundering. I was even questioned in the incident. I talked with her son. As an near anthropologist by training, I have yet to see any hard concrete historical documentation for either group.

    Blackbird
     
  5. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I've seen articles criticizing the wa****aw nation, but I haven't heard anyone criticize the Azizan Moorish Nation. In fact on the web page of the Azizan Moorish Nation, it says they will take legal action against anyone who refers to them as a common law group or anything other then the Nation that they are.
     
  6. Edward Williams

    Edward Williams Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Everyone who is not white is black. That is how the world is run among people. We are in a death camp. A prison of injustice. Where all of the prisoners are non-white (black). There are "trustees" in this prison that have more privileges and more things than other prisoners but we are all prisoners of injustice.

    The only real nation is the nation of white people who practice racism (white supremacy) who keep us in this world wide prison of injustice. There is no such thing as a nation of prisoners.
     
  7. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I can state with upmost certainty that the Azizan Moorish Nation is not recognized by the BIA or any state government as a Native American group. If so, the website would state such claims.

    A nation is not necessarily a political entity. Nation can be defined as "communities of people who see themselves as "one people" on the basis of common ancestry, history, society, institutions, ideology, language, territory, and (often) religion."* Thus, the Nation of Islam is a nation. Black people in America constitute a Nation. Its aspects are more cultural and social than political. I understand that Moorish (Morros) ideology indicates various treaties that the United States entered with the government of Morocco, with the most pivotal one being the Morocco Treaty of Peace and Friendship signed on June 23, 1786, as referenced at The Nation of Moorish-Americans website: http://www.thenationofmoorish-americans.org/treaties.htm.

    What becomes problematic with this is any Black person whose ancestry goes back at least to the, let's say, 1850's in the United States, and whom are currently living in the United States, must provide documentation of a direct ancestral link to Moroccan citizenship. The BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs) has a set of criteria before it recognizes any group petitioning for recognition.

    The criteria follows:

    (1) demonstrate that it has been identified as an American Indian entity on a substantially continuous basis since 1900;

    (2) show that a predominant portion of the petitioning group comprises a distinct community and has existed as a community from historical times until the present;

    (3) demonstrate that it has maintained political influence or authority over its members as an autonomous entity from historical times until the present;

    (4) provide a copy of the group’s present governing document including its membership criteria;

    (5) demonstrate that its membership consists of individuals who descend from the historical Indian tribe or from historical Indian tribes that combined and functioned as a single autonomous political entity and provide a current membership list;

    (6) show that the membership of the petitioning group is composed principally of persons who are not members of any acknowledged North American Indian tribe; and

    (7) demonstrate that neither the petitioner nor its members are the subject of congressional legislation that has expressly terminated or forbidden the Federal relationship.

    That said - for any group of Black folks petitioning for sovereignty based on an obscure treaty and whose African ancestors were as diverse as the fish in sea, ranging from Wolof to Bakongo to Makua to Ewe to Dagomba to Mbundu, the bar would be much higher to fulfill unless the members originated from consistent and verifiable Moroccan ancestry and claim nationality and citizenship from that ancestry along with the supporting historical, geographical, linguistical and kinship (surname) documentation. Otherwise, that group is pissing in the wind and wasting valuable time and resources on diversions and distractions.

    We must also be honest and acknowledge that the polity of Morocco did not have political sway of the whole of the African continent, let alone any place south of the northern Sahelian area, if that. Neither the Alafin of Oyo, the Asantehene of the Asante, the Mani Kongo of the Kongo, the Mogho Naaba, the Burba of Wolor, the Bur of Waalo, the Damel of Kayor, the Ogiso of Benin, the eze Nri of Nri, nor the Sultans of the Hausa states entered into any agreement with the United States government.

    I guess I'm passionate about this because one of the things I believe hindering our people is a crisis of identity. I think we are afraid to deal with Africa and our ancestry, more importantly, on their own terms. We seem to have a genius for concocting elaborate and exotic stories of being descended from some semi-mythical seafarers on time travel ships or followers of Sinbad or the last Jedi from "Mecca", "Shangri-la", "Atlantis", "Mu", or where have you, but know not the first thing about Ile-Ife, Notsie, Niani, or Nsi Kwilu. As we seek to expunge ourselves of the vestiges of European domination, we continue to value the places European antiquarians and Knights Templar buffs value at the detriment of some possibly more appropriate "holy places". We become European Freemasons without being European Freemasons. We immerse ourselves in Kemet, but often we know nothing of the Akan cultural complex except to use the similiarities to take it back to Kemet. We know Horus, but not Sango. We know Muhammad but not Orunmila. We know Abraham but not Okomfo Anokye. We are Hebrew Israelites and Israelite Hebrews, Asiatic Muslims and Muslim Asiatics, Ethiopian Christians and Christian Ethiopians, Spanish Moors and Moorish Spaniards - we are everything except descendants of African slaves from places like Fouta Djallon, Ngola, Biafra, Ketu, Dahomey and so on so forth. Until we address our identity crisis and stop trying to be everything else, we will never be free. Yes, of course, our lineages may include some of the more exotic "Eastern stuff", but we are much more than that. Why are we so afraid of ourselves and seek to create fanciful identities. The colonization of the Negro mind never ceases to amaze me.

    Blackbird
    *Definition comes from "Cultural Anthropology, 9th ed. Haviland, 1999."
     
  8. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I couldn't have said it any better, but I think one of the main problems with knowing our African lineage is that it is not free or even cheap to have an expert do the search for you. And most of us are in a European mindset even we are not European and for that reason most of us don't care about our African Lineage
     
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