Black History Culture : !Black History Is Worldwide!

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Fine1952, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Publius Terrentius Afer
    (Known as "Terrence the Afrikan")
    Circa 185 B.C. to 159 B.C
    [​IMG]

    "Terrence the Afrikan" was borne of African descent and later brought to Rome by the Roman Senator, Terentius Lucanus as a slave. The senator later educated then freed him. [1]

    Although a comedy writer, it was his literature that Shakespeare "mimic-ed" in order to place his own works into the spotlight of World history. To his 'own' credit he is known as the “the greatest of the Latin stylist”. [2] All of his plays were structured in five-act sections. [3]



    Reference

    1. http://www.theatrehistory.com/ancient/terence007.html
    2. http://blackhistory.tribe.net/thread/c42f2b43-09e7-4bfc-9428-82912ccdc09f
    3. http://www.trinicenter.com/kwame/20010615b.htm

     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe


    Saturday, February 16, 2013, 10:00 am
    Princeton University Art Museum, McCormick Hall, Princeton, NJ |Get Directions »
    FREE


    Exploring the presence of Africans and their descendants in Renaissance Europe through paintings, drawings, sculpture and printed books of the period, this exhibition provides a narrative for an often forgotten social group and an avenue for understanding the social issues of color, class and stereotypes of the time, offering an essential new look at European art for all visitors. Organized by the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in collaboration with the Princeton University Art Museum.
    The Art Museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 10 a.m-5 p.m; Thursday: 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sunday: 1 p.m.-5 p.m.
    [​IMG]
    Annibale Carracci, attrib. (Italian, 1560 – 1609), Portrait of an African Slave Woman, ca. 1580s.


    [​IMG]
    Peter Paul Rubens, (Flemish, 1577–1640), Head of an African Man Wearing a Turban, ca. 1609

     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.theroot.com/views/black-greek-and-really-old-school
    Black, Greek and Really Old School

    Image of the Week: From statues to ceramic vessels, Africans appear often in the art of Ancient Greece.

    (The Root) -- This image is part of a weekly series that The Root is presenting in conjunction with the Image of the Black in Western Art Archive at Harvard University's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research.

    An often overlooked but highly significant component of ancient Greek art involves the representation of black people. From the mid-sixth century B.C. to the late Roman period, Africans appear in a multitude of forms. They are encountered on carved reliefs, statues and statuettes and vase paintings and were almost certainly featured in large-scale paintings that have been lost to posterity. Hand-modeled ceramic vessels like this example were first produced in potters' shops in Athens. They were rapidly distributed throughout the Greek world, both as exports and as local production.

    The hundreds of examples that still exist in museums and private collections throughout the world attest to the popularity of Africans in ancient times. Often a black head is joined on the same vessel with another head, such as a young woman or a satyr. The role of the black person in ancient Greece may seem exotic, but in fact it is here revealed to have been widely recognized and incorporated into a culture that, as Martin Bernal has pointed out, was, after all, so close to Africa.

    The Image of the Black in Western Art Archive resides at Harvard University's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. The director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute is Henry Louis Gates Jr., who is also The Root's editor-in-chief. The archive and Harvard University Press collaborated to create The Image of the Black in Western Art book series, eight volumes of which were edited by Gates and David Bindman and published by Harvard University Press. Text for each Image of the Week is written by Sheldon Cheek.

    [​IMG]
    Greek (Attic) kantharos in the form of elderly man's head; second half of sixth century B.C.
    (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.theroot.com/views/aesop-black-fabled
    Aesop: Black, as Fabled?

    Image of the Week: This 1755 British statue of the famed Greek is one of many that depict him as African.

    ....Aesop, the ancient Greek fabulist, is seen here in an animated pose, apparently in the act of telling one of his famous stories. He is dressed in a fanciful outfit typical of the Rococo period, which may also reflect the exotic and colorful livery worn by black servants in aristocratic European households. The figure's purpose is essentially decorative, and it served as a centerpiece for formal dining tables. References to Aesop go back to the sixth century B.C., but little is known of his origins and identity. From an early date, however, he was characterized as an outsider, ugly in appearance, as well as a slave.

    Black Africans were certainly known to the ancient Greeks. In the case of Aesop this is exemplified by the story often attributed to him of "washing the Ethiopian white."

    Only in the medieval period, however, in a biography by the Byzantine scholar Planudes was Aesop actually described as black. There his name is falsely conflated with Aethiops, an early term for African people meaning "burned face." The association stuck, however, but several more centuries were to pass before Aesop was actually represented as a black person. This process began when Planudes' work was translated into English and published by Francis Barlow as Aesop's Fables With His Life, first published in 1687, with a later edition of 1703.

    Responding to an inquiry from a potential buyer, Aesop stated: "I am a Negro." Yet in the accompanying illustrations he is not clearly black. The unambiguous representation of Aesop as a black occurs when the modelers of the Chelsea porcelain factory elaborated on this image as the basis for their ceramic figurine of Aesop. Its appearance in the mid-18th century on the dining tables of wealthy English homes therefore presented a truly novel, vibrant image of the ancient sage.....

    [​IMG]
    Great Britain, Chelsea Porcelain Factory.
    Aesop, circa 1755. Cambridge, U.K.; Fitzwilliam Museum
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
    Anonymous, Italy, Bust of black woman, 16th century(?)
    Faience, Ecouen, Musée de la Renaissance
    .....
    The woman represented in the bust here is usually described as a servant. In this case her elegant attire would distinguish her as a member of an aristocratic Italian household. Many servants possessed skills and talents very valuable to their employers. This woman could have served as a cook or as an attendant to the lady of the household. Her blue skin has a technical explanation, since the color black could not be rendered in glazed terra-cotta.

    The Image of the Black in Western Art Archive resides at Harvard University's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. The director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute is Henry Louis Gates Jr., who is also The Root's editor-in-chief. The archive and Harvard University Press collaborated to create The Image of the Black in Western Art book series....

    http://www.theroot.com/views/blue-beautiful
     
  6. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Wow! -- Thanks for sharing Cherry Blossom -- I'mma have to take a second look at you!

    The topic does say world wide. The info you offered is priceless, although I am very much aware of these world characters. I love the pictures as well as the information provided. Maybe this should be a sticky -- I don't really know protocol, should I ask Destee?

    1Love
    Fine1952:hearts1:
     
  7. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is an awesome thread!!!!

    Both you and Sister cherry are dropping it!!!

    Amazing!
     
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