Black History Culture : Black History & Heritage of North Carolina

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Nov 21, 2012.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Famous African-Americans of North Carolina

    .. here are five famous and very important North Carolinians:

    Harriet Ann Jacobs (February 11, 1813 – March 7, 1897)
    Harriet Jacobs was born a slave in Edenton, NC. She eventually escaped slavery and became an influential speaker on abolitionism. She wrote under the pen name of ‘Linda Brent,’ sharing her life story. Although she suffered and lived through a tough time, her story truly gave hope to those around her.

    John Merrick (1859 – 1919)
    John Merrick was born into slavery by a single mother living in Clinton, NC. Who would have guessed that Merrick would become the founder of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company? Through hard work and entrepreneurship, John Merrick founded many companies in Wake County and Durham County.

    Romare Bearden (September 2, 1911 – March 12, 1988)
    Romare Bearden was born in Mecklenburg County and moved to New York at a young age. Bearden pursued art after graduating from NYU in 1935 and ended up making abstract collages and art. He also coauthored several books as well as authoring his own. Bearden’s art evoked thought and inspired many to explore the world of abstract art. The New York Times praised Bearden as “one of America’s pre-eminent artists.”

    John William Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967)
    John Coltrane was born in Hamlet, NC. In 1945, while he was enlisted in the Navy, he played saxaphone for a Navy jazz band. After returning to civilian life, he continued playing jazz and pursued his interest in the genre. He is considered one of the most influential saxophonists in jazz and his music is truly iconic.

    André Leon Talley (born October 16, 1949)
    André Leon Talley was born in Durham, North Carolina and raised by his grandmother, who introduced him to ‘luxury.’ After graduating North Carolina Central University, he continued his education and wound up in New York City, where he was an assistant to Andy Warhol. He worked for Interview, the New York Times, and worked his way up to editor-at-large at Vogue. He is now considered ‘one of the most influential people in the fashion industry.’

    http://wakecounty.wordpress.com/2011/02/28/famous-african-americans-of-north-carolina/
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.visitnc.com/journeys/articles/popular-attractions/1/north-carolina-s-black-history

    1. Greensboro, N.C. marks the 50th anniversary of the lunch counter sit-in that inspired a national civil rights movement. The International Civil Rights Center & Museum opened on Feb. 1, 2010, in the 1929 F.W. Woolworth building. The museum's 30,000 square feet of 16 educational exhibits features the spot where four A&T freshmen sat in on Feb. 1, 1960. The historic lunch counter and stools have never been moved from their original footprint.
    2. North Carolina Central University, Durham, opened in 1910 as a private school and in the 1920s became the nation’s first state-supported four-year liberal arts college for blacks. It became a full university in 1969 and joined the UNC system three years later. Originally known as the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua, the institution's mission is still to develop students' character and academics for higher service to the nation.
    3. The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture is Charlotte's newly constructed 46,500-square-foot home for the former Afro-American Cultural Center. For 35 years the organization has celebrated the cultural contributions of Africans and African-Americans and serves as an epicenter for music, dance, theater, visual art, film, arts education programs, literature and community outreach. The new building's exterior texture is reminiscent of quilt designs from the Underground Railroad era and woven textile patterns from West Africa. Named for Charlotte's first African-American mayor, the Center hosts both permanent and temporary exhibits, including works by Romare Bearden, Juan Logan and David Wilson.
    4. In the 1700s, New Bern became known as a popular town for both slaves and free blacks in Colonial America. In 1860, free blacks composed 13% of the city’s population and prominently shaped its political, economic and cultural life. Tour the city's historical homes, churches and businesses that have rich legacies, including sites of local sit-ins spawned in conjunction with the Greensboro Woolworth sit-ins.
    5. On the North Carolina coast, the Roanoke Island Freedmen’s Colony is an historic National Underground Railroad “Network to Freedom” site. The majority of this land’s 3,000 residents had been slaves before forming a colony here between 1862 and 1867. Major General John G. Foster, Commander of the 18th Army Corps, ordered Horace James, a Congregational minister from New England who was serving as a chaplain in the Union army, to establish a colony of former slaves on the island. Although the Roanoke Island freedmen’s colony was an experiment of national significance, few people are aware of its history.
    6. Built in 1861, St. Philips Moravian Church in Winston-Salem is the oldest standing African-American church in the state. It stands adjacent to the newly reconstructed 1823 log church with exhibitions conveying the African-American experience in the Moravian community. Today, the church is part of Old Salem.
    7. Executive Chef Walter Royal gained national fame and prominence when he won "Iron Chef" in 2006 for his unique ostrich dishes. Thirteen years of his influence on the wine list and use of local ingredients at Raleigh’s famous Angus Barn and Wine Cellar continues to be a national and North Carolina source of pride. CBS's “48 Hours” and Southern Living magazine have featured Chef Royal; the restaurant has won the Ivy Award, Wine Spectator Grand Award, Fine Dining Hall of Fame Award and numerous other honors. You can sign up for "Walter Royal's Teaching Kitchen" classes at
    8. In the 1870s, at the Pea Island Life-Saving Station at the Outer Banks, a station keeper who bungled a rescue was fired and replaced by Richard Etheridge, an African-American who was renowned to be one of the best surfmen on the North Carolina coast. Surprisingly for the times, Etheridge was promoted from the lowest to the highest position: Keeper of the Pea Island Station. No black man in the country had ever held that position. His all-white crew quit. Etheridge had no choice but to recruit only blacks from nearby stations. So, not by design, the station became the only one for a period of time to have an all African-American crew. That crew was posthumously awarded the Gold Life-Saving Medal in 1996 for their heroic 1896 rescue of all nine passengers on the three-masted schooner E.S. Newman during a hurricane. Today, the efforts of this heroic crew and all the others who were the Guardians of the Graveyard of the Atlantic along North Carolina’s Outer Banks are honored at the Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station Historic Site and Museum in Rodanthe, one of the most complete, historic life-saving stations in the United States.
    9. The Chuck Davis African-American Dance Ensemble, now based in Durham, combines dramatic staging, pulsing rhythms, masterful choreography and colorful costumes with consistently enthusiastic audiences to create an artistic experience impossible to forget. Founded in 1968 in New York City, the company has gradually established itself as one of the premiere African-American dance ensembles in the United States. The company performs both nationally and internationally. The Dance Ensemble considers itself an agent of social change that stresses the best in human values of peace, love and respect.
    10. The YMI Cultural Center is the most enduring African-American socio-cultural institution in Western North Carolina. It offers permanent and rotating exhibits by African-American artists in 7,500 sq. ft. of museum space as well as cultural arts programs. The former Young Men’s Institute was designed by Richard Sharp Smith, supervising architect for Biltmore, and built by George Vanderbilt in 1893. It was intended to serve not only the many African-American workers who helped build Vanderbilt’s mansion, but also the entire African-American community.
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  5. G Ali

    G Ali Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow...did not know Coltrane was from NC. I'm still flipping through the presentation...enjoying the read queen...thanks.
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    [​IMG]


     
  7. nubin noir

    nubin noir Member MEMBER

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    Thank you for posting this. The information is very informative
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ...1829 The fiery Appeal of Wilmington native David Walker was printed in Boston and made its way to North Carolina, stirring the fears and suspicions of white slaveholders and legislators. David Walker's Appeal, in Four Articles; Together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World, but in Particular, and Very Expressly, to Those of the United States of America was eventually banned in North Carolina and other Southern states, but two more editions were printed before Walker's mysterious death in 1830.

    1849 London R. Ferebee was born to enslaved parents in Currituck County. His master, Edwin Cowles, took Ferebee away from his family to work with his boating crew, and in 1861, Ferebee was living with his master's family in Still Town, a village outside of Elizabeth City. In August of that year, Ferebee ran away to Shiloh, North Carolina, to seek protection with the Northern army. He records these events and other adventures in his 1882 narrative A Brief History of the Slave Life of Rev. L. R. Ferebee, and the Battles of Life, and Four Years of His Ministerial Life. Written from Memory.

    1898 The Wilmington race riots erupted. On November 10 and 11 a white militia headed by local Democratic leaders terrorized the black community, killing and wounding dozens, banishing much of the city's black leadership, and burning the offices of several black businesses, including Wilmington's black newspaper, the Record. David Bryant Fulton's Hanover (1900) and Charles Chesnutt's The Marrow of Tradition (1901) are both thinly fictionalized accounts of the massacre. J. Allen Kirk, a black minister in Wilmington, details his experience in A Statement of Facts Concerning the Bloody Riot in Wilmington, N.C. Of Interest to Every Citizen of the United States (1898).

    The Coastal Plain
    1790 Henry Evans, a Virginia-born shoemaker, organized Evans Chapel (now The Evans Metropolitan AME Zion Church) in Fayetteville. Evans was headed for Charleston when he stopped in Fayetteville and felt called by God to stay and help reform the residents there. Rosser H. Taylor's The Free Negro in North Carolina (1920) and Carter Godwin Woodson's The History of the Negro Church (1921) both refer to Evans' work.

    1813 Harriet Jacobs, America's most famous female slave narrator, was born in Edenton. Jacobs escaped from her cruel master Dr. James Norcom and hid in a tiny attic room for seven years before fleeing to the North. Her 1861 narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, records her experiences in both slavery and freedom.

    1823 Joseph Baysmore, elder of the First Colored Baptist Church of Weldon, was born in Bertie County. Baysmore become an ordained minister in 1866, and in 1887, upon leaving Weldon to minister in Halifax County, he published a brief autobiographical sketch accompanied by four of his sermons...


    http://docsouth.unc.edu/highlights/roundup.html
     
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