Black People : Black Hair Industry ROBBED and Dominated By Asians

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by RAPTOR, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    (There are at least 3 parts)

    I was watching this clip, and about 6, or so minutes into it, a sista who make her own hair-cair products spoke about korean owned stores had begun to blacklist their products, reducing shelf space for products made by non-black businesses while duplicating what the black folks were making.

    Sometime ago, I was debating with someone about economic discrimination. I pointed out how stores would give little to no shelf-space to products made/produced by black-owned companies. The sista on the clip further substantiates that fact.

    Personally, I don't think the "korean connection" has it on lockdown so much so that we can't get into that market. One way to break into it, is to obviously hire black folk and try to donate/fund projects or programs that help the community in some way. Scholarships/grants for college or vocation. The koreans aren't doing that. Show to the people that one is of the community where one's business stands and the support will ensue.

    Also, for those who buy these hair care products, ferret out these black-owned and product-made business and get at'em as much as possible.
     
  2. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black people learn that they need straight hair.

    Black people learn that they need to be tolerant of other races.

    Then Black people get scolded when they get straight hair from other races.

    This is a symptom of the problems.

    The problems are the first two. We should address those two.

    There really shouldn't be a hair care industry on Black people period.

    So long as you leave it to 'individual choice' you will get individuals who choose to destroy their hair and destroy their race. But that's on you.

    You can't have your cake and eat it too.

    HTP
     
  3. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    If you stop buying their products from their stores, that solves that problem.
     
  4. MimiBelle

    MimiBelle Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hmm.

    Capitalism rewards the individuals who can produce the products that others are willing to buy. Basically. That's why these NFL players will always earn more than teachers and social workers.
    *shrug*

    The asian didn't do anything special. They just saw availability - an 'in' - and moved to capture/cater to it. More came over here. Saw the profit potential, a chance for entreprenuership...and moved in on it.
    For what occurs with black hair product shops...occurs in other areas ('nail shops'). They go where the money flows.

    Think about it --> Who does your nails, ladies?
    A little 'pilipino' woman does mine. *laugh* She can barely speak english, but she's gifted at footrubs and feeds me Lumpia everytime I come around.

    I rarely encounter black women who do nails, anymore. White 'nail ladies' tend to work at spas/medispas...which, in a way, does showcase how effective the push was. The asian inundated and successfully grabbed a corner of what used to be spa business/domain, if you think about it.

    Black folks...know what's going on but tend to get all 'huffy' and cry about the situation...instead of actively doing something about it. I don't get it. People have got to get over that 'fuss, rant and cuss' kneejerk reaction, in general.
    How long ago did the 'Asian Phenomenon' occur in the black hair industry...?
    Black folks still crying about it.
    "They take our money...."
    ...because you give it away (and ruminate instead of acting).
    Duh. *shrug* The above video is just another variation of the same. Telling us (most of us, I'd hope) more of what we already know.

    **************************

    'Solutions?'
    Y'know - I think it a good idea for folks not to waltz into a 'Black Folk Solution Discussion' without ingesting an aspirin tablet and an antacid, first.
    Maybe it's just me, but it seems like every proposed solution entails 'us' having to practically re-make the wheel....? *laugh*
    Is it...just me?

    Solutions....
    Ok, I would say that black folks should just go out and actually build businesses that distribute black hair products IN the communities. This isn't happening from what I've seen, in my travels.
    I mean opening up a biz and directly competing with these other shops. It can be done.
    The asian peddles an inferior product.
    1. They have no understanding of black hair care (structure or composition).
    2. They have no product knowledge. They're just throwing the bottles up on the shelves. You ask them a question and they'll only be able to guide you based on what 'most shoppers tend to purchase'. They don't actually 'know' anything.
    3. Half of them can't even speak english. *laugh*
    WHAT competition? Black biz owners in black communities have one major plus going for us...we are black. Black consumers do tend to lean towards their own.

    I also think that black biz owners could stop b/tching at the black consumer to carry them, suck it up and learn how to run a business properly.

    Lastly, maybe a little 'consumer teaching'? You have to encourage black folks to understand the players in this game. To understand who they're enriching with their dollars. To locate a black shop in their area and support them, instead. To locate online black stores to support. To support their own...and why.
    Now, they may/not support the business. But...they'll 'understand', for future reference.
    It's all that you can hope for.

    Some may not be aware that the store selling black products with a multicultural staff isn't necessarily 'black-owned'.
    Some may not be aware that the black face on the bottle isn't a black-owned company. Most have no idea the contents of what they're even putting on their heads.
    You'd be surprised by how much people assume. You have to help them understand. They're not stupid and we're all ignorant of something. They don't know. To an extent, they aren't inclined to do any research. They look to you, the product owner, to fill the void.

    That's not just 'black people'. That's most people.
    That's 'The Consumer'.
    *shrug*
    ...and most consumers just 'don't know, what they don't know'.
    Just how it is.

    You could, say, write an article in the black newspapers (every city has one). Talk about conditioners. Sew-ins. Natural Hair. Relaxers. Little tidbits...but enough to get your name out and establish yourself as an expert in your industry...and recommend a few black hair care shops/stores while you're at. Maybe putting it in the head of your readers to support black businesses in their local area.
    I've done it...but I was never forceful about it.
    I would make suggestions. I think it more effective for a message to be nonassuming. Like a low and steady drumbeat.
    People will usually respond to a whisper vs a scream.
    *shrug*

    ************************

    I'm an angel investor for a beauty salon, a/o last year.
    I don't know how to do hair...AND I went into business with a friend.*laugh*
    Just breaking all the rules.
    I just pop in to visit and chat with my friend and do my little walk-through, looking through records/receipts and insuring that everything's on the up and up. *laugh*
    But - really, I'm just backing the dreams of another. She said, "I want my own shop...."
    I said, "OMG...when do we start?" *laugh*
    I had a PP presentation, 4 page marketing ideas and a business plan drawn up by the next day! I am my father's daughter. *laugh*
    We don't have a website, sorry. For now - she's operating on 'word of mouth' and my efforts (schmoozing with local bridal shops and such, car magnets, cards, craig'slist, hair shows, charity hair events in the community, etc...), alone. It's on the backburner. I just concentrated on site reviews. Most black shops around here don't have much of a huge web presence, either.
    She (the beautician) really wants to have a high-end multicultural shop. This was her original vision. So, we'll probably put something together shortly. Or, she will...because she's going to end up paying for it. Not me. *laugh*
    The Bank of Mimi has closed.

    Either way, those in the black hair care profession (at the salon level) can't compete with others for trying to outcompete each other.
    ...and that's not counting those who expect that business will just 'come to them'. Present itself at their doorstep. Pretty sure it's like that where distribution is concerned. It's a problem that some black business owners have or develop, imo.
    Of course, we're black...but there are other components to making a business run effectively. Can't just rely on that.

    Consumers...consume. They will go wherever the getting's good and business owners face loads of pressure to deliver everything faster...better.
    Sure, it's fine to have a niche and count on 'race loyalty, but it can't be left entirely up to the consumer to build anyone's business.
    Black or not.

    Now, I mentioned something a half mile up about 'direct competition'.
    Yes, I stand by that. Your race identity is a one-up on the other shops. That's all.
    I wrote what I did under the assumption that the (black) business has their sh/t together and can go up against an established business. Can be a REAL competitor.

    But those are my thoughts on the matter.
     
  5. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't know how you can blame the Asians here, because it is blacks who buy the product! It's unbelievable! Just don't buy from Asians!

    What's even worse here is African American women have gone decadent spending an awful lot of money on hair products (not a reasonable amount of money) when this money could have been invested somewhere else. Wake up, stop blaming whites, clean the house first.

    A Nigerian could build a successful business with the money just one of those women spend on hair products. Decadent and revolting individuals.
     
  6. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    ROBBED is a bit strong, when folk are handing the money over willingly.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  7. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Perhaps the author (of the title) is expressing a feeling, not an actual happening.

    At least that's what I interpret. Anyway, I thought it to be quite informative.
    I've always heard of the korean's grip on the hair-care industry, but not to
    any significant depth did I get all into it. Likely, due to the fact that I don't
    seek such products.

    ...Not since I've been cutting my hair bald anyways.
     
  8. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Maybe some AA on this forum should mobilize themselves and hand over pamphlets by Korean stores to inform the people about the situation. Hammer it into their subconscious everyday for a week at least.
     
  9. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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    Peace Raptor,

    I think the term BLACK HAIR INDUSTRY is a misnomer. Because black folks are the primary customers, that does not make it our industry anymore than the fact that black folks buy a lot of milk does not mean that their is a BLACK MILK INDUSTRY. That hair that we see on black womens heads and those of us with sisters saw all over the house.. is Asian hair.. its them selling hair from their region to African women all over the world.. It makes sense to me that Asians companies would dominate this industry.. and also that they would seek to protect their domination of that industry.
     
  10. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Exactly. They are selling their hair. The problem is that African people are valuing Asian hair.

    At one point in the documentary, it's pointed out that the Black Hair magazines are written entirely in Korean. Duh. That's the language that they read in.
     
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