Black People : black folks fundamental element of the economy.

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by skuderjaymes, Sep 6, 2010.

  1. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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    Black folks are the fundamental element of the economy. We are raised just like
    crops.. herded into schools that get paid per pupil.. into prisons that get paid per prisoner..
    divided from families into individuals.. from one household to 4.. to 4 cars.. to 4 electric bills.. to
    4 TVs.. etc.. our condition is the key to the US economy.. and the US economy is the key to
    the World economy. As we go, so goes the world. And the world knows it.. folks come from
    all over the world to setup shop in our neighborhoods.. to sell us alcohol and clothes and
    do our nails and sell us their hair.. our collective self-esteem issues are profitable..
    our lackluster education is profitable.. our division is profitable.. our despair is profitable..
    even our crime is profitable.. drug dealers pay electricity bills too.. and buy clothes and
    cars and jewelry.. when they are arrested, they don't make those companies return that
    money.. the car dealer keeps that money.. the seller of that house keeps that money, etc..
    it could be argued that miseducated black boys are necessary components
    of the American economy. slavery or not, they will make money of us
    one way or another. The US pays farmers not to farm but is building
    more and more prisons to fill with black men and women.. I guess that
    means we are more profitable than corn or wheat..​
     
  2. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Tru'dat.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    OK so how do we turn that around?
     
  4. Enki

    Enki The Evolved Amphibian STAFF

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    In addition to this,the black dollar is estimated at 1.3 trillion in 2013.
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Then after the warnings of Garvey, Elijah Muhammed, Malcolm, Karenga, Ferguson, Amos Wilson, and Claude Anderson,
    we must be the laughing stock of the world
     
  6. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    It's the conditioning of us .......I hope we wake up soon and realize what's really going on !
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The High Cost of Poverty: Why the Poor Pay More

    By DeNeen L. Brown
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Monday, May 18, 2009

    You have to be rich to be poor.

    That's what some people who have never lived below the poverty line don't understand.

    Put it another way: The poorer you are, the more things cost. More in money, time, hassle, exhaustion, menace. This is a fact of life that reality television and magazines don't often explain.

    So we'll explain it here. Consider this a primer on the economics of poverty.

    "The poor pay more for a gallon of milk; they pay more on a capital basis for inferior housing," says Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.). "The poor and 100 million who are struggling for the middle class actually end up paying more for transportation, for housing, for health care, for mortgages. They get steered to subprime lending. . . . The poor pay more for things middle-class America takes for granted."

    Poverty 101: We'll start with the basics.

    Like food: You don't have a car to get to a supermarket, much less to Costco or Trader Joe's, where the middle class goes to save money. You don't have three hours to take the bus. So you buy groceries at the corner store, where a gallon of milk costs an extra dollar.

    A loaf of bread there costs you $2.99 for white. For wheat, it's $3.79. The clerk behind the counter tells you the gallon of leaking milk in the bottom of the back cooler is $4.99. She holds up four fingers to clarify. The milk is beneath the shelf that holds beef bologna for $3.79. A pound of butter sells for $4.49. In the back of the store are fruits and vegetables. The green peppers are shriveled, the bananas are more brown than yellow, the oranges are picked over.

    (At a Safeway on Bradley Boulevard in Bethesda, the wheat bread costs $1.19, and white bread is on sale for $1. A gallon of milk costs $3.49 -- $2.99 if you buy two gallons. A pound of butter is $2.49. Beef bologna is on sale, two packages for $5.)

    Prices in urban corner stores are almost always higher, economists say. And sometimes, prices in supermarkets in poorer neighborhoods are higher. Many of these stores charge more because the cost of doing business in some neighborhoods is higher. "First, they are probably paying more on goods because they don't get the low wholesale price that bigger stores get," says Bradley R. Schiller, a professor emeritus at American University and the author of "The Economics of Poverty and Discrimination."

    "The real estate is higher. The fact that volume is low means fewer sales per worker. They make fewer dollars of revenue per square foot of space. They don't end up making more money. Every corner grocery store wishes they had profits their customers think they have."

    According to the Census Bureau, more than 37 million people in the country live below the poverty line. The poor know these facts of life. These facts become their lives.


    COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/17/AR2009051702053.html



    PHOTOS Previous Next
    Time is money, and both are in short supply: Quintin Strange, left, and Kenneth Thomas say they've cut back their weekly laundering to every third week because of the recession. (Photos By Lois Raimondo -- The Washington Post)

    Lenwood Brooks says he paid $15 to cash a $300 check at a check-cashing shop because he lost his license and his bank "won't recognize me as a human." (Lois Raimondo - The Washington Post)

    Harrison Blakeney pays his phone bill through a check-cashing operation that charges 10 percent extra to send the payment. "That's how they make their money," he says. (By Lois Raimondo -- The Washington Post)
     
  8. Enki

    Enki The Evolved Amphibian STAFF

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    And we are bruh, We have power,power that make black presidents in a country such as America,power that start wars based on lies and we don't even realize it.
     
  9. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you for that Gibran qoute

    It is painfull, to wake up each day towards Super Tuesday, 9/14 and know that after all the excitement of putting a Brother in office of the highest position in the world that we have not galvanized that energy, power and potential to think seriously about the primaries as Malcolm had told us to do almost 50 years ago,
    and that we hardly have that on ur minds even with the fact that only 13 percent fo anybdy votes that day and we could without a shadow of a doubt,
    be the deciding factor.

    It is painfull to see that we do not have a pool out of a Trillion dollars to give the Black Farmers Organization 4 billion until they finally get their settlement,
    or a 50 billion dollar safety net to assist sisters and brothers swindled by subprime loans and are now in risk of losing thier homes.

    And it is heartbreaking to see in this new School Term;
    the defacto privatization of schools across the nation and the closings , massive closings of schools in our communities,
    and out of a trillion dolllars we do not have a free, fully acredited; home schooling tutorials and curriculum for Black parents on line,
    or Our own massive funding of our own Private Black schools, so that foplks do not have to depend on a doggone lottery system where one out of 3 000 Black children can get into schools like the Chicago Young Men's Acadamy

    Scholastic Excellence should be a right for every single Black child on the planet!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  10. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :10500: is Rangel gonna win the primary?
     
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