Black People : Black Film Festival

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by nexis5, May 15, 2001.

  1. nexis5

    nexis5 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When was the last time you have attended a BLACK FILM FESTIVAL? If not state why? If so, where, what did you see, how much was admission and how did you find out about it?

    Your experiences are very much appreciated.
     
  2. nexis5

    nexis5 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    no such thing. Nada. Zero.

    Am I speaking in a foriegn language? I think I turned off the subtitles. Hello? Como Esta?
     
  3. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Haaaaaaaaaaaaaay Nexis :wave:

    i hear ya !!!

    putting in my 2 cent ... i have never attended a (black) film festival

    :(

    Destee
     
  4. nexis5

    nexis5 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dont believe in cable.

    Thanks for voting Destee!

    HBO had a FESTIVAL on tour recently in my town called TELLING STORIES. It was essentially the BLACK FILMS that were produced for their cable network. I got the chance to see Disappearing Acts and The Dorthy Dandrige Story.
     
  5. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Sounds like Fun !!! I'll have to make it my business to attend such a function one of these days. Thank you for sharing.

    Nexis, speaking of voting, this new, upgraded forum has the ability to create polls (on any topic you'd like). Just make sure you create the poll in the "Poll Category" as they are not allowed in the other categories.

    http://www.destee.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?forumid=21

    You can access the poll function when you create a "New Thread." At the bottom of that screen is the option to include a poll, if you check it, you will be forwarded to a page where you can set it up (responses, etc.).

    Thanks for being a part of this community if I've not thanked you already.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.abff.com/festival/


    The 13th Annual American Black Film Festival Culminates with its Awards Presentation and Screening of “Black Dynamite

    The Roe Effect Wins the HBO® Short Film Award
    and Mississippi Damned Wins Best Narrative Feature



    Miami, FL - June 29, 2009 – Film Film Life’s 13th annual American Black Film Festival (ABFF) announced the winners of their Independent Film Awards at the Colony Theatre on June 27, 2009. The ABFF is the premier destination marketplace for films that showcase the best new work by and about people of African descent. The Best Narrative Feature winner was Mississippi Damned which also took home the prize for Best Actor. HBO® is the festival’s Founding and Premier sponsor.

    “The ABFF Independent Film Awards continues to celebrate the best independent films produced and directed outside of Hollywood. We are committed to providing new opportunities each year for emerging talent and bringing the best work of these gifted filmmakers to a broad audience,” said Jeff Friday, CEO of Film Life and founder of the American Black Film Festival.

    The award winners are as follows: *

    HBO Short Film Award, presented by HBO (award includes a $20,000 cash prize)
    The Roe Effect directed by Kiel Adrian Scott

    Best Narrative Feature, presented by BET Networks (award includes a $5,000 cash prize)
    Mississippi Damned directed by Tina Mabry

    Best Documentary
    Len Bias directed by Kirk Frasier

    Audience Award
    Blue directed by Ryan Miningham

    Allstate Beyond February “Be Reel" Contest Winner, presented by Allstate (award includes a $5,000 cash prize)
    The Broken Sole directed by Travis Trent

    Best Actor *
    Tessa Thompson in Mississippi Damned

    Star Project Winner, presented by Vibe magazine
    Khalilah Joi Dubose, female winner
    Bechir Sylvain, male winner




     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  8. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I have never been to one and would love too someday in Chicago if they do one here
     
  9. Afrodisiac

    Afrodisiac Member MEMBER

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    I always attend the African-American film festival in martha's vineyard every year in August with my family. Interesting and powerful films and documentary's.

    Check out the website http://www.mvaaff.com/
     
  10. ocacia

    ocacia Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Cater for garbage and whites

    Here is an extract on PAFF

    The African filmmaker has to work 10 times as hard because of race and 20 times as hard if there is a Pan-African message in the film. The African is denied a platform in white society and there was a need to create platforms independent, which fosters the expression of the African filmmaker, especially where issues of agency and self-determination were being expressed. Places like Pan-African Film Festival were created with this central ideology of reinforces positive images of self from a position of agency (i.e African controlling image of self and owning images of self). However, The Pan-African film festival and others like it with their bold titles are failing their primary mission year after year. These platforms intended for Africans, allow an increasing volume of Whites in with their “Tarzan” films about Africans to compete in spaces where the African is already disadvantaged. The African is denied a competitive space, economically and ideological in Western society and the few so-called African space created for them do more to reward White filmmakers, the same filmmakers who have opportunities in their mainstream white world and now also in the African world.

    There is almost no quality control regarding the garbage content that is entered under the banner of Pan-Africanism.*Therefore, the awards initially design for the advancement and recognition of Pan-African ideals and African filmmakers does more to service White agendas and poor content. Content which is at times utter, divorced from Pan-African ideals of positive image reinforcement.

    There is a long history of the missionary, military, the merchant and the media in under developing Africa. Africans are very accustomed to letting White come into African spaces and save act as messiahs. Still we believe that they have our better interest. Like a child that believes its abusive parent really loves them. We would rather reward a white filmmaker for documenting Africa than celebrate an African for doing it. We reward their the very denial of agency and are satisfied to watch yet another White Tarzan project investigate and project images of African again and again.

    Most Africans are unaware of how many lock doors exist until they try to open them. In addition, the privilege of even getting to the door is denied by structures of institutionalized racism. Hence, the economics of putting a film on the market is the first obstacle; the politics of funding is another doorstop, and then finally the grand obstacle of recognition and distribution.
     
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