Black Women : Black Feminism Movement?

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by Jaisolovely, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I honestly do not know what the "Feminism Movement" was really about and I will look into but what did it have to do with "Black Women" is my question?

    Why did black women feel the need to create our own and join this movement?

    I have heard a few black men rants on how African women of America are corrupted and they rather find a wife outside of America. Hearing this does hurt my heart and we (all of us) perpetuate our own (and the white man's) stereotypes on each other. I am starting to believe that black women has and still does contribute to the destruction of the black family. What are your thoughts. Educate a sista because I'm clueless.
     
  2. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have enough books that are on my list. I really dont plan on taking a course in women's studies.
    I'm trying to understand the mentality of today's black woman and what it is that she faces in today's society.

    I do not engage in most activities that women of my age do so I dont know whats going on. I have completely stopped watching videos (barely any tv at all), listening to the radio and have never stepped foot in a club. I dont have any kids so there is no such thing as "baby daddy" drama and I have stopped dating as well.

    When I do interact with the opposite sex, I do get irritated by their boyish behavior. I can understand why the guys my age act the way they do. Hey their acting their age but what are the grown men's excuse?

    From what I have read (correct me if I'm wrong) you do consider yourself a Feminist? And I would like to know what does being a Feminist mean?

    Does being a Feminist contribute to the deprogramming of the every day woman's mind? Are you all promoting "Black is Beautiful", a black woman does not have to follow the European's Standard of beauty to be considered beautiful? Or that its our God/dess given right to be natural and proud of it?

    Do you all promote awareness of how our (the woman's actions) can, does or has contributed to the downfall of the black family because we are so caught up in playing the victim role?

    Does it promote the Goddess awareness?

    Does being a Feminist promote being a Lesbian? Wasnt this the reason why this whole movement started any way?
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :qqb011: yup
     
  4. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black Man's Guide to Understanding the Black Woman...

    I was too young to even remember this sister or to know she existed, but I believe she makes some valid points. There are seven videos. Here are the first three. Sista's pay attention, we've got work to do!!


    Par 1:


    Part 2:


    Part 3:



    We all need to stop pointing the finger.
     
  5. phynxofkemet

    phynxofkemet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What Sister Amazon has said, because it's completely accurate, there is a distinction between Feminism and Womanism and Ain't I A Woman is a wonderful book! Anything by Bell Hooks is really insightful and brilliant.

    I took 2 years of Women's Studies and found it a eye opening because the agenda of feminist White women is just as destructive to the family unit as the Caucasian male politics. And I am very glad that I know just how far the rabbit hole goes and how it works in conjuction with the legislation.

    If I hadn't taken the material however, I would not have been exposed to the works of African Canadian, Asian Canadian and Aboriginal womben whose writings blew my mind. With that said, I suggest studying both, it will give you a context in which to understand the different positions and goals.

    In terms of African men blaming their women for the disintegration of the family unit, all I can say is that in healing the wounds of our people, it does us no good at all to blame one another for external forces that seek to divide and conquer. Unfortunately, we have been so preoccupied with survival issues that some of us haven't risen past the point of this separation and been able to see the larger picture.

    I for one, will not shoulder that blame, nor will I lay it on another. The responsibility of healing belongs to all of us! Every individual must take accountability for their actions.
     
  6. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I agree that we all are to blame but most woman want to point the finger completely at the men in our community. I also dont see anything wrong with us discussing how we all on both sides, have contributed to our downfall along side the oppressor. Its ok for us (women) to create a thread on how angry we are and to complain but we're not innocent either. Its time to identify the root of the problem so that we all can come up with a solution and to break down paradigms. You all are to bright to not want to share the knowledge with the rest of our sista's and brothers who arent so conscious.
     
  7. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Will my questions get answered?

    You all keep saying read this book. Well if your not going to answer my questions than I rather you not post.

    I may not be well versed as the other posters on here but can you not see the bigger picture? Lets address the issues now and spread the word. Create a domino effect to transform our minds to think for ourselves separate from white imperialism not separate from each other. :qqb026:

    Yes Amazon mentioned that the Black "Feminism" Movement is called the Womanist Movement but what is the difference? I think its time to google.
     
  8. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Womanism.... is foolish!!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Womanism



    Now read why this idiot thinks "Prison is good" for our Kingz!

    http://robertlindsay.blogspot.com/2007/10/prison-is-good-for-black-men.html

    Now read this one: More young African Americans in Prison

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/954681/posts


    Why is more money invested in the prison system than for higher education within our communities?

    Why are our men being targeted so hard?

    What should we (the women) really be advocating for in this day and age?

    We both are victims of racism, classism, and sexism!
     
  9. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When I first read your question, I opted to not become involved in this conversation. Then I heard you say
    and I was compelled to respond. I am motivated by my care, concern, respect and admiration of you as a young Sistren of Afreekan Descent seeking to grow into her own as a Woman of Afreekan Descent. ( I said more the first time and I think a bit more eloquently as well)

    Well…here I talked a lot about the start of the “feminist” movement riding the tails of Men of Afreekan Descent standing up for themselves and their families in the quest for civil rights. At this point, it is too late and I’m ready for bed. I will attempt to recreate more tomorrow and/or would love to blog talk about what I experienced as a child during that era.

    I can say that Patriarchy was being attacked, primarily by white women; yet, black women also came face to face with the notion of sexism. WE did not create the mess WE are all in and I for one refuse to take the blame or shoulder the burden of this load of stuff.
    ECONOMICS was the primary order of the day and many women found themselves unable to provide adequate food, clothing and shelter for themselves and their children after the civil war and/or after suffered physical and sexual abuse.




    They did not wish to remain in marriages when their husbands were sowing their oats all over the place, active in alcohol addictions and all the drama that comes with that. they could not leave because, economically they were enslaved to him and had no means of providing for themselves and the kids if they left. To stay meant to continue to suffer the emotional impact of infidelity and abuse in all its forms.
    Woman of Afreekan Descent were also having these experiences. One primary difference was that we were better prepared to deal with it as our people, men and women alike, had already developed the ability to cope with it as WE as a people had been suffering from the same types of abuses on a broader societal level. Men and Women of Afreekan Descent had lived thru and with fending for ourselves economically and knew how to make a way out of seeming no way. We knew how to stretch a dollar and make a meal for ten. We knew how to make clothes, obtain shelter, support each other during times when we had next to nothing...economically.
    We also desired to capitalize on our god given intelligence by obtaining college degrees in any profession and not be relegated to "menial work" which called for dummining down our minds. Our men were held away from the women and children, beat down and incarcerated UNLESS he played the white man's game. Many brothers "sold out" during that time and many women went to school, used the welfare monies to raise the children while the men were "away" and many did so with the support of the man she was connected with.

    During that time, now in the early 70's, the message was to us children of that time..."don't be no fool, go to school". Many a black man developed "jungle fever"...playing the white man's game cause heck...who wanted to die or go to jail. Malcolm, Martin and the great savior Kennedy were clear and present examples of what would happen should you step out of line. I sense the white women, who now also had sexual freedom to screw at will openly and eagerly chose Men of Afreekan Descent as a partner for "free love" which was also part of the menu of the day. Everybody was "going along to get along".
    Many Afreekan Descendants, both man and woman, did go to school. Yet, the notion, concept and practice of Patriarchy did not change.
    Gender roles remained in full effect with the woman's primary role being that of caretaker to the man and children, responsible for clean living quarters, decently prepared meals and good loving at will. Men were still taught it was their role to be primary and sole provider of economic resources regardless of the fact that both parties in the marriage or relationship were working out of the home. Mind you as well, this movement was also started due to the male causalities of the Civil War when many white men did not return home standing on two feet. Some had one and many more came home in boxes leaving those women with only cooking, cleaning and crochetting skills which could not be capitalized so as to pay for food, clothing and shelter and they probably did not want to wait out the grace period to go screwing either.

    So...just because WE WERE ALL forced to play this dirty game does not equate to "black women became feminist and jacked up the whole black family structure" ....WE ALL got played. Yet, what man do you know who is willing to ADMIT that he got played:?: So much easier to point the finger at someone else..the white man...the black woman as the culprits for his getting sucker punched.

    No, it was not my sense that black woman brought into the feminist movement yet we did recognize that we were experiencing a three-fold reality...racism, sexism and classism. Racism and classism were are ready known factors in our lives and this we shared with our men. Sexism was brought to the forefront during this movement and my gut tells me white men wanted it that way. They are good for flaunting their "victories" in your face. It was just the next move in the grand game they have created here on Earth.

    Yes, woman can and have been oppressed by men. There was a time when women could NOT be lawyers, doctors nor rocket scientist. Never mind if she was blessed or bestowed the mind, energy, will and desire to do so....she was relegated to the household, teaching, nursing and we know these jobs paid little. White women had probably experienced the brunt of patriarchal views and practices and many of them were discouraged from going to school beyond high school. They were told they did not need a college degree because the man would care for them. 'We got some of those messages as well however, our men were also kept out of the halls of academia...hence the need for a civil rights movement. Not only did we get tired of riding the back of the bus, we wanted to learn how to drive it too...for pay. Our men also wanted to obtain careers like doctors etc..and were discouraged from doing so. Maybe that's why it was so easy for our men to identify with white women and they freely laid up with them.

    In the end....I know it was a little bit of this and a little bit of that and a whole lot of this and a whole lot of that ...that continues to feed the death grip of oppression we are still under. It was not one thing. It was BOTH/AND.


    Now...I do not know if I've answered your question yet I do know, I've done the best I could (in this format) to share what I have come to know about this all. Having been a child of the 60's and a Woman of the 80's and beyond...one who followed what BOTH my parents, grandparents, politrickal leaders (blacks) etc...told me to do....go to school....and because I obtained a degree which allows me to think beyond the kitchen....I'm now relegated to the role of "feminist" and all my efforts, contributions are viewed through that one lens of this ****ty story and game represents a hugh injustice. and as a result....I'M MAD AS ALL GET OUT!


    Finally Sis Jaisolovely....
    The thread you referenced....
    was not created to vent anger. It started out as a question by a Woman of Afreekan Descent who is from the Continent seeking to overstand a concept which has been pushed at nausium.....the "Angry Black Woman" and which she believed she was witnessing while in conversation with a Woman of Afreekan Descent who was apparently expressing anger based on her experiences with black men. I can appreciate how one may view that conversation as a complaining session yet, I also know it is a touchy and painful topic. As I stated in that thread, my primary problem is in the labeling of the woman as the problem. I am a Woman who is angered by some things...I am not an angry black woman.
    I experience the feeling of Anger whenever I perceive an act of injustice. I have experienced acts of injustice perpetrated by black men, white men, black woman alike. I tend to focus primarily on the acts of racism first and foremost and that's just what I told those white women at the elite school I obtained my Master's degree from...when conversations of being a "feminist" surfaced. NO...I am not a "feminist" however, I am concerned about the acts of RACIST in my people's lives. And they left me alone too!


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  10. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks you have answered my questions.
     
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