Black People : Black family in Asia

medusanegrita

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Batek

Beliefs that Foster Peacefulness. The Batek believe that one of their diseases, ke'oy, consisting of fever, depression, shortness of breath, and weakness, is caused when someone is angry with another without justification. While there are some spells that may help, the cure for the disease is for the person who is angry to control his or her feelings so the victim can recover. The person responsible for the problem treats the victim with various folk remedies, tells the victim's heart to be cool, blows on his or her chest for the cooling effect, and grasps and throws away the disease. This belief in ke'oy helps ensure that the Batek treat each other well, since victims receive group backing and angry people, who cause disease, may lose social support and be ostracized.

Avoiding and Resolving Conflict. While they do not resolve conflicts in a formal manner, people frequently have public discussions of disputes in attempts to gain supporters for their arguments. When conflict resolution strategies fail, one of the parties to a dispute will often leave the group for a while to let feelings of anger dissipate.

Gender Relations. Men normally hunt while women gather vegetables, but both foods are valued equally and both sexes are part of the food-sharing network in their camps. Men sometimes gather vegetables, and women sometimes (though rarely) hunt—they have no Batek man threading tubersrigid rules separating their sex roles. Both sexes gather the rattan that they trade for outside goods, and men and women both participate in government-sponsored agricultural activities. Marriages are based on equality, compatibility, and affection; couples make joint decisions about their activities. They normally have close, companionable relationships while they work together and enjoy their leisure time with one another. If the warmth of the relationship erodes, either spouse can divorce the other and count on the support of the band to assist with child-support and food sharing.

Raising Children. Batek fathers as well as mothers spend a lot of time cuddling, holding, and talking with infants of either sex. Parents are quite relaxed about discipline: one two-year old child used a bamboo flute his father had just finished making as a hammer. The father didn't care since he could easily make another. Parents rarely strike a child or use physical force on them, since their word sakel means both to hit and to kill, an abhorrent concept to them. Parents may discipline children by warning them about tigers, strangers, or the thunder god that punishes people who violate religious prohibitions. Children play actively but not aggressively, and they lack competitive games.

Social Practices. Their camps consist of autonomous families that share enough interests to prompt them to converge together. They schedule and informally coordinate group activities such as fishing. They discuss group issues extensively and rely on natural leaders for their experience, judgment, and advice. These leaders can only be persuasive—they have no authority. The Batek tolerate the occasional lazy individuals, since their spouses often make extra efforts as if to compensate.

Sense of Self. The Batek identify themselves as forest people; the forest is their true home. Their shelters are scattered about wherever they decide to camp, with no symbolic defenses from the forest. While the thatch is still fresh and green, it is almost impossible to see a camp from even a few feet away. They prefer the forest because it is cool and, they feel, healthier than living in the heat of the clearings. They also prefer the forest because it gives them a refuge from other people.

Sharing. The Batek have a firm expectation that all food, including game that is killed and vegetables that are gathered, will be shared. When different groups come back to their camp near the end of the day, after the tubers and pieces of meat are carefully shared, the families cook their meals and then send their children carrying plates of food to others, despite the fact that everyone already has enough. This teaches the youngsters the importance of their sharing ethic. They also share other goods freely, whether they are obtained as gifts or purchased through their trading. Except for the elderly or infirm, each person can share without causing a strain and whatever is given will presumably come back at some point.

Strategies for Avoiding Warfare and Violence. The Batek are totally opposed to any interpersonal violence—they flee from enemies instead of fighting. The anthropologist Kirk Endicott (1988) once questioned a man about the Malay slave raids that lasted until the early 20th century: why didn’t his ancestors shoot the attackers? “Because it would kill them,” the man answered in shock. Violence, coercion, aggressive behavior, and physical retribution are so totally unacceptable to the Batek that they would ostracize anyone who was belligerent. Batek women, as well as men, are free from the threat of physical violence because of these beliefs.

But How Much Violence Do They Really Experience? Kirk Endicott implies (1988), though he does not come right out and say so, that there is very little if any violence among the Batek. Karen Endicott (1992) does describe the way one woman, who was evidently quite unstable emotionally, struck her children at times when she got very angry with her husband.
What a beautiful society. Absolutely beautiful. As are the people.
 

Seneb

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The people of Cambodia still call themseves Khmers which means black people although most do not look black now due to mixture with surrounding peoples with lighter complexions.
She was talking about the Batek people of Malaysia,not the Khmers.Check out the previous page.
 

abdurratln

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She was talking about the Batek people of Malaysia,not the Khmers.Check out the previous page.
Okay. I have no problem with that. Actually, I am not much into anthropology. I generally appraoch these type issues from the perspective of history. So, while I do not know that their name is Batek, I know that all of those islands in the area have large numbers of black peoples of several different tribal names. I guess my main point is that the Khmers are just one of these many groups. But, beyond that point, if we look at geography, we will see that an unbroken link of peoples from Afrrica to the Indian sub-continent are black. This includes all the Islands, including Japan and the Philipines.

Most recently, I learned that the black people of Tamil Nadu of India are probably related to the others in the islands because the lands of the Tamils once reached almost to the African continent. What we have now in terms of islands are the mountaintops of land that is now submerged below the sea. So, they are all African to some extent. But, more importantly, there have always been trade and commerce between Africa and Asia along these island links. So, now that we are into Economic Decvelopment, we must restore our ties with our people in the islands, the Indian Sub-Continent and Camabodia, Vietnam, China, etc.
 

Seneb

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Aboriginal Indigenous spirituality and beliefs





Aboriginal spirituality is inextricably linked to land, "it's like picking up a piece of dirt and saying this is where I started and this is where I'll go. The land is our food, our culture, our spirit and identity."

Dreamtime and Dreaming are not the same thing. Dreaming is the environment the Aboriginal people lived in and it still exists today "all around us". None of the hundreds of Aboriginal languages contains a word for "time".

Spirituality is expressed by ceremony, rituals or paintings. It can change and has absorbed elements of other beliefs.

Too many white people have tried to explain Aboriginal spirituality. I don't want to follow. I'd like to let Aboriginal people express what they feel Aboriginal beliefs and spirituality are all about.

What is Aboriginal spirituality?

Our spirituality is a oneness and an interconnectedness with all that lives and breathes, even with all that does not live or breathe.—Mudrooroo, Aboriginal writer [1]

Aboriginal spirituality, Mudrooroo continues, "is a feeling of oneness, of belonging", a connectedness with "deep innermost feelings". Everything else is secondary.

Aboriginal spirituality and the land

Aboriginal spirituality is invariably also about the land Aboriginal people live on. They experience a connection to their land that is unknown to white people. A key feature of Aboriginal spirituality is to look after the land, an obligation which has been passed down as law for thousands of years.

A powerful explanation of the spiritual connection of Indigenous people to the land can be found in a publication of the now abolished ATSIC [13]:

We don't own the land, the land owns us. The land is my mother, my mother is the land. Land is the starting point to where it all began. It's like picking up a piece of dirt and saying this is where I started and this is where I'll go. The land is our food, our culture, our spirit and identity.—S. Knight [13]

Aboriginal author and Yorta Yorta woman Hyllus Maris (1934-86) expressed this connectedness with the land beautifully in her poem Spiritual Song of the Aborigine [6]:
Spiritual Song of the Aborigine

I am a child of the Dreamtime People
Part of this Land, like the gnarled gumtree
I am the river, softly singing
Chanting our songs on my way to the sea
My spirit is the dust-devils
Mirages, that dance on the plain
I'm the snow, the wind and the falling rain
I'm part of the rocks and the red desert earth
Red as the blood that flows in my veins
I am eagle, crow and snake that glides
Thorough the rain-forest that clings to the mountainside
I awakened here when the earth was new
There was emu, wombat, kangaroo
No other man of a different hue
I am this land
And this land is me
I am Australia.


How Aboriginal people express spirituality

Indigenous people express and identify with their spirituality in different ways. These include

* ceremony (corroborees),
* rituals,
* totems,
* paintings,
* storytelling,
* community gathering,
* dance,
* songs,
* dreamings,
* designs.

[Aboriginal] spirituality is preoccupied with the relationship of the earth, nature and people in the sense that the earth is accepted as a member of our family, blood of our blood, bone of our bone. —Mudrooroo, Aboriginal writer [17]
Read more: http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/spirituality/index.html#ixzz0s5Muo3VD
 

wetac0s

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Being Asian myself, here is my take:

Modern day east asians came from the native people of siberia - the Evenki and the native people of Southeast Asia - austronesians. The farther north you go, the more Evenki they are, the farther south you go, the more austronesian you are.

It doesn't matter if you go to Indonesia or Japan, there is obviously going to be overlap and Asian people everywhere will have certain defining features that are common amongst all asians. Due to many years of cohabitation and intermixing, Asian people today are all linked in some way. Many white people try to divide the Asian race and create conflict and hatred, but in reality, Asians are have much more in common than the Westerners want us to think.

China is probably the best example because it straddles east, west, north, and south. Many different "tribes" have conquered and settled in China, that is why most Chinese people are mixed with many different asian ethnicities. Unlike Korea, China is the most diverse nation in Asia. There are Chinese people who look kind of white, black, native, etc....The farther south you go, the darker the complexion. If you want to see every different type of Asian, go to China.

It has been proven that all Asian people (whether siberian or austronesian) came from a tribe in Africa - it could have been the Khoisans. I believe that White people probably came from a different species than Blacks, Natives, and Asians - probably neanderthals. It makes sense since Caucasians are the only race with predominantly light features, protruding noses, browbones, and lots of body hair. No other race has those features. White people also seem to have no conscience and the need to conquer different races. Blacks, Asians, and Natives have minded their own business and stuck within their tribes for a long time before Whites came and plundered their lands. They seem to have this notion that they have the right to stick their noses in other people's business. I don't think other races have that sense of entitlement and arrogance - it must be genetic.
 

abdurratln

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Having lived and traveled in Asia and having many Asians friends, I agree wiith about everything said.

Being Asian myself, here is my take:

Modern day east asians came from the native people of siberia - the Evenki and the native people of Southeast Asia - austronesians. The farther north you go, the more Evenki they are, the farther south you go, the more austronesian you are.

It doesn't matter if you go to Indonesia or Japan, there is obviously going to be overlap and Asian people everywhere will have certain defining features that are common amongst all asians. Due to many years of cohabitation and intermixing, Asian people today are all linked in some way. Many white people try to divide the Asian race and create conflict and hatred, but in reality, Asians are have much more in common than the Westerners want us to think.

China is probably the best example because it straddles east, west, north, and south. Many different "tribes" have conquered and settled in China, that is why most Chinese people are mixed with many different asian ethnicities. Unlike Korea, China is the most diverse nation in Asia. There are Chinese people who look kind of white, black, native, etc....The farther south you go, the darker the complexion. If you want to see every different type of Asian, go to China.

It has been proven that all Asian people (whether siberian or austronesian) came from a tribe in Africa - it could have been the Khoisans. I believe that White people probably came from a different species than Blacks, Natives, and Asians - probably neanderthals. It makes sense since Caucasians are the only race with predominantly light features, protruding noses, browbones, and lots of body hair. No other race has those features. White people also seem to have no conscience and the need to conquer different races. Blacks, Asians, and Natives have minded their own business and stuck within their tribes for a long time before Whites came and plundered their lands. They seem to have this notion that they have the right to stick their noses in other people's business. I don't think other races have that sense of entitlement and arrogance - it must be genetic.
I especially agree with the take on Neandertahls. One need not be an anthropologist to see the realtion between Neandertahls, their slow to no wit, and most, if not all, Europeans: http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&q=neanderthal+girl&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=univ&ei=3O0oTKPNHqronQfRhMGoAQ&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CCcQsAQwAA.
 

wetac0s

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A fish of a different color
February 2006


The zebrafish, a small but flashy aquarium pet, may seem like an unlikely informant on questions of human genetics — yet its genome could hold the keys to understanding many diseases and, surprisingly, the genes underlying human skin color. In December 2005, a cancer research team headed by Keith Cheng at Penn State University announced that their studies of the mutant "golden" zebrafish had taken an unexpected turn: they had discovered a single human gene that accounts for about 30% of the difference in skin color between African and European descendents. This color difference can be traced back to a tiny difference in two versions (or alleles) of the gene.

The "G" allele is common among African descendents and causes more of the dark pigment melanin to be present in skin cells,

while the "A" allele is common among European descendents and causes less melanin in skin cells.

But how did different ethnic groups wind up with these different versions of the pigmentation gene?

Research suggests that more than 100,000 years ago, the earliest humans lived in Africa and carried the "G" allele, which causes lots of melanin to be present in skin cells and hence, dark skin. Melanin absorbs UV rays from the sun and controls the amount of UV radiation that penetrates our skin. Our bodies need some UV radiation (to build the essential vitamin, vitamin D) but not too much (because UV radiation can damage the skin and destroy another essential vitamin, folate). In the sun-drenched environs of Africa, dark skin was advantageous, preventing UV rays from doing too much damage, while allowing in enough UV to synthesize vitamin D. In that environment, individuals born with a mutant version of the gene associated with less melanin and lighter skin would probably have had poor health and low reproductive success.

Many biologists hypothesize that between 55,000 and 85,000 years ago, humans began to migrate out of Africa. Some of them wound up living in the colder, darker climes of Europe. There, too much UV radiation was not a problem, but too little UV to synthesize vitamin D probably was. At some point either before or after the migration out of Africa, a mutation occurred in one of the ancestors of modern Europeans. This mutation was tiny, changing just a single base, but it caused much less melanin to be present in the skin of those who carried the mutation. This was the "A" allele. Among the new Europeans, this allele likely had an advantage over the "G" allele. Individuals carrying the "A" allele had less melanin, which allowed more UV light to penetrate their skin, which could have allowed them to synthesize vitamin D better than those carrying only the "G" allele. These "A"-carrying individuals had increased reproductive success in their sun-poor environment, and via natural selection, the "A" allele spread throughout the European population. Meanwhile, among Africans, the "G" allele continued to be advantageous and to maintain its majority there.

The discovery of this pigmentation gene has helped us piece together a more complete picture of the evolutionary changes that underlie skin color differences between human ethnic groups. It suggests that a great deal of the skin color difference that has delineated the boundaries of social tensions for much of recorded history can be traced back to a tiny genetic change that allowed humans to better survive and reproduce in particular environments.

This discovery also highlights the fundamental similarity of all humans. Skin color, it turns out, really is skin deep; at a genetic level, the skin color difference between a European descendent and an African descendent might be largely influenced by a single base pair difference in a genome composed of three billion base pairs. However, neither does this single gene tell the whole story.

For example, many East Asians carry the "G" allele and yet have light-colored skin. Why? We don’t know, but it is probably due to many other undiscovered genes. And though, on average, people who carry only the "A" allele have lighter skin than those who carry only the "G" allele, there is a huge overlap in skin color between the groups — so knowing which alleles an individual carries will not let you predict with much certainty the shade of his or her skin. It is clear that the concept of "race" is more a sociological construct than a biological one, and that many genes and environmental factors influence skin color. As we learn more about these genes, we will learn more about our own evolutionary history as a species.
"The color difference can be traced back to a tiny difference in two alleles of the gene. The "G" allele is common among African descendents and causes more of the dark pigment melanin to be present in skin cells, while the "A" allele is common among European descendents and causes less melanin in skin cells. However, East Asians carry the "G" allele and yet have light-colored skin.

African and Asians - Same skin type, different color
Whites - Different skin type, different color

No wonder White people age so fast.
 

Seneb

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Those pictures I found on the web are interesting,i use them with the spirit of this thread,which is to show trough pictures the faces of the aboriginal asians.However be conscious that the person who made these pictures is a piece of ish who got an incredible hatred toward black people and melanited people in general lmao.Check his sorry ***** in flick.com:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gurvinder_singh_hamza/

















 
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