Brother AACOOLDRE : Black Codes

Discussion in 'AACOOLDRE' started by AACOOLDRE, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Messages:
    2,445
    Likes Received:
    364
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Teacher
    Location:
    Michigan
    Ratings:
    +400
    The Black Codes of 1865
    .

    As newly freed slaves would soon learn, freedom was not as they had anticipated. White southerners were anxious to regain power over them, and used the law in order to achieve that objective. In 1865, southerners created Black Codes, which served as a way to control and inhibit the freedom of ex-slaves. Codes controlled almost all aspects of life, and prohibited African Americans from the freedoms that had been won.

    Not only did whites want to control ex-slaves, but also they needed laborers. While things could no longer be exactly the same as in slavery, they found a way to guarantee that blacks would serve as their laborers. To do this, they created Black Codes. While Codes were unique to the post-Civil War south, they encompassed some of the antebellum restrictions on free blacks, northern apprenticeship laws, and the Freedmen's Bureau and the War Department regulations.

    Codes regulated civil and legal rights, from marriage to the right to hold and sell property to the predestined definition of African Americans as agricultural laborers.
    Laws were different in each state, but most embodied the same kinds of restrictions. Commonly, codes compelled freedmen to work. In many states, if unemployed, blacks faced the potential of being arrested and charged with vagrancy. Many of those that did work had their day regulated. Codes dictated their hours of labor, duties, and the behavior assigned to them as agricultural workers.

    Black Codes left African Americans with little freedom. Even the freedom to chose a type of work was often regulated. Many white southerners believed blacks were predestined to work as agricultural laborers. In addition, the advantage of regulating occupations provided them with laborers. In South Carolina, for example, a special license and certificate from a local judge attesting to a freedman's skill had to be obtained in order to pursue work in any occupation other than in agriculture or domestic work.

    Self-sufficiency was also discouraged. Codes prevented African Americans from raising their own crops. In Mississippi, for instance, they were restricted from renting or leasing any land outside of cities or towns and black ownership was left up to local authorities.
    Almost every aspect of life was regulated, including the freedom to roam. Often blacks were prohibited from entering towns without permission. In Opelousas, Louisiana, blacks needed permission from their employer to enter the town. A note was required, and it had to state the nature and length of the visit. Any black found without a note after ten o'clock at night was subject to imprisonment. Residency within towns and cities was also discouraged. Local ordinances in Louisiana made it almost impossible for blacks to live within the towns or cities. Residency was only possible if a white employer agreed to take responsibility for his employee's conduct.
     
  2. darkreign

    darkreign Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    2
    Ratings:
    +2
    I read a book called “the black west” and it mentioned this black co
    des in it. In my reading of this section, I found out that it was against the law for a black to bring legal action against a white, and b\c of this; black store owners lost a lot of merchandise b\c of theft by whites.


    good post

    peace!!!
     
  3. Edward Williams

    Edward Williams Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    58
    Occupation:
    Produce Justice
    Location:
    Right here!
    Ratings:
    +58
    I once read a book called The United-Independent Compensatory Code/System/Concept: A textbook/workbook for thought, speech, and/or action for victims of racism (white supremacy).

    Very interesting.
     
  4. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    4,647
    Likes Received:
    363
    Occupation:
    Leader-Student-Teacher
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Ratings:
    +367
    You know what - this is very interesting. I also read how [even though it is still in effect today] BLACK WOMEN could NOT take WHITE MEN to court for Rape. In other words, White Men can Rape as many Black Women as they want to, and get away with it.

    'f you don't believe me, look at the Duke Rape case.

    KD
     
  5. darkreign

    darkreign Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    2
    Ratings:
    +2
    i agree with you bruh, you see, whites wanted to still control ex-slaves but things could no longer be exactly the same as in slavery, so these code made it possible for them to continue to have control of us and to have us continue to serve them as their laborers.

    Today, you can still find things that can be viewed as a way of trying to control us to serve them. Bruh, these codes was used to dictate every facet of our lives.

    some whites still have the notion that a group of blacks talking means that they are plotting something. I’ve seen where (in a round about way) a group of bruthas talking was broken up while the white groups were left alone. But they were sneaky with it.


    peace!
     
Loading...