Black People : Black civil war Veterans

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Nov 11, 2009.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    From the beginning, both black slaves and freeman saw this opportunity to serve in the military as a method for relinquishing their chains and proving their inclusive worthiness to this nation. Some black slaves, for some unknown reasons, remained with their masters and assisted them on the side of the Confederacy during the entire period of the Civil War. On the whole, there was widespread resistance by whites on both the Union blue and Confederate gray sides in accepting Blacks as part of the military. The Union Secretary of War issued a statement:

    "This Department has no intention at the present to call into service of the government any colored soldiers."
    The need for able-bodied fighting men soon led individual states to swear into the military separate REGIMENTS OF ALL BLACK TROOPS. Other Blacks found acceptance as volunteers in semimilitary or military support positions. Not until August of 1862 did Blacks receive the endorsement of Congress to serve in the Civil War. "Congress revoked the militia laws banning Blacks" from serving in the Union Army. Soon afterward, Abraham Lincoln issued on January 1, 1863, THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, "freeing all slaves in areas still in rebellion."
    The Emancipation Proclamation opened the door full-fledged for Blacks to participate in the Civil War. On May 1, 1863, the War Department created the BUREAU OF COLORED TROOPS in order to handle the recruitment and organization of all black regiments. These units were known as the UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS, and all units were commanded by white officers. The widespread knowledge about these all black units of the Civil War came about recently with the popularity of the movie, GLORY, starring Denzel Washington. Based upon the triumphs and defeats of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, a historical moment was captured in the lives of some unknown American Freedom Fighters. Twenty-four black soldiers were awarded the meritorious CONGRESSIONAL MEDALS OF HONOR, and over 200,000 African Americans served in the U. S. armed forces during the Civil War. 620,000 Americans died in this war. Over 38,000 Blacks died.

    Among the countless soldiers were:
    Ruff Abernathy * Jeremiah Alpheus * Aaron Anderson * Joe Anderson * Alexander T. Augusta * Jasper Banks * William H. Barnes * Powhatan Beaty * William Bell * Charles Bentley * Willian Bibb * Nicholas Biddle * Robert Blake * John R. Bowels * Richard Henry Boyd * William Bronson * James Bright * William Brooks * Goodman Brown * Jefferson Brown * George W. Burrows * Frank Cage * Andre Cailloux * William H. Carney * George Garnish * James Henry Conyers * Willian Dabney * Benjamin Davis * Tobias Dawson * Martin R. Delaney * Thomas S. Dixon * William Dupree * Robert B. Elliott * Christian A. Fleetwood * R. B. Forten * William Jackson * Charles L. Mitchell * Miles Moore * Thomas S. M. Pierson * P. B. S. Pinchback * Demps Whipper Powell * Jeremiah Sills * Stephen A. Swails * Harvey A. Thompson * James Monroe Trotter * Wade Watkins * Nim Wilkes * Bill Yopp

    CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS
    Being able to fight in a DIVIDED AMERICA presented a complex set of rules for American Blacks. Some were FREE, some were SLAVES seeking freedom, and some were fighters with LOYALTY to a way of life UNDER CONFEDERATE RULE. Equality was hard to achieve for the African American during this ERA in history. The war was a bloody one, and it cost the lives of over 38,000 Blacks seeking to be a part of the FREEDOM ON AMERICAN SOIL.

    THE ASSAULT ON FORT WAGNER
    The battle shown here was one of the toughest and most famous of the Civil War period. The pictured hill is just in front of FORT WAGNER, a confederate bastion on a small island facing the CHARLESTON HARBOR. The huge sand mound led up to the FORT, which prevented outsiders from entering the city of CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA. To the right is the ALL BLACK 54TH INFANTRY under the command of Colonel ROBERT GOULD SHAW. Shown also, in the foreground by the flag, is WILLIAM H. CARNEY, the first African American to earn the MEDAL OF HONOR for his exemplary bravery and service to his country during the Civil War. Ironclad ships in the harbor, flanked regimented troops, and man-to-man combat as they advanced the Hill was the order for battle. The movie GLORY is a good depiction of what happened at FORT WAGNER, JULY 18, 1863.

    FREDERICK DOUGLASS
    Period: The American Civil War And The Indian Campaigns
    Frederick Douglass was one of America's most respected and well-known African American orators and abolitionists. His untiring energy and experience as a former slave from Maryland equipped him with the knowledge and fortitude to seek freedom for others. Frederick Douglass became a world renowned traveler. He preached about the enslavement of African Americans, but he also demanded world justice. Irish Americans were also addressed as mistreated peoples by Douglass. Frederick Douglass' life, as captured in his NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE (1845), is profound reading for everyone. During the American Civil War, Douglass was a forceful leader and "urged Lincoln to free the slaves and arm all Negro men." Douglass' own two sons were among the first to serve the Union forces in the Civil War. Douglass also published his newspaper, THE NORTH STAR (1847), and later THE DOUGLASS MONTHLY (1859-1863). Douglass also helped to establish the 54th Massachusetts Regiment of the Union Army.

    HARRIET TUBMAN
    Period: The American Civil War Through The Spanish-American War
    Among other captive American slaves, HARRIET TUBMAN was known as an "Angel of Mercy." She was also born into slavery in Dorchester County, Maryland around 1821. Before she died in 1913, her early untiring work was well-known among the slaves, abolitionists, and slave catchers. She escaped bondage in 1849 and dedicated her life to freeing other American slaves. Harriet Tubman became the most famous of the "CONDUCTORS of the UNDERGROUND RAILROAD." At the risk of being captured and hung, she made 19 trips to the SOUTH and helped over 300 runaway slaves to freedom up NORTH. She was known to be quick, shrewd, and clever. It is said that she never lost a "passenger" on the freedom trail. Southern slave owners wanted to capture Ms. Tubman so badly, they offered a huge REWARD of over $40,000 (around $600,000 in today's money). During the Civil War, Harriet Tubman worked as a spy for the UNION ARMY. Ms. Tubman's home in AUBURN, New York was designated a NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK by the U.S. Department of the INTERIOR on May 30, 1974.


    full article

    http://www.liu.edu/CWIS/CWP/library/aaffsfl.htm#CIVIL
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=542s_gEXTBI
     
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