Beauty - Hair Care - Fashion : black-america-please-stop-appropriating-african-clothing...

jamesfrmphilly

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jamesfrmphilly

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https://thsppl.com/no-one-can-take-my-africanness-away-185e227be13d#.cxkvd5dvk

"Unlike a lot of people from the diaspora, I do know my tribe. Some may say that is an advantage, but for anyone who has ever grown up on the Motherland, as it were, they will know and understand that this can also be a burden. What people fail to understand is that unlike those from the diaspora, I can never look at the elegent wrappers/kente of Ghana and decide that I prefer their styles to my tribe and wear it. It is a near unspoken rule. We have our lines and we don’t cross them."
 

NNQueen

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This is good information. It opens the door for more conversations between African Americans and Black Africans. I can respect what the article is revealing as in the pulled quotes. . .

"Africans may not be as vocal as Americans when it comes to appropriation rights. And I get that Black America’s history is one marred with so many injustices that I would never claim to understand. The emergence of a unified voice that is strong and proud is one that I respect and continue to applaud, but please also understand the need for us to be heard, too. Please don’t trample our rights fighting for yours."

"If you’re not from an African tribe, please leave off wearing the tribal marks. Otherwise you’re participating in the very thing you vehemently speak out against."

"Sure we may not wear Ichafus on a day-to-day basis anymore, but that doesn’t mean their significance to us is lessened. These things are reserved for funerals, births, weddings . . . significant rites of passage — vital points in our lives that we share with our community and people. It is how we express ourselves in the collective."

It's evident that we have a lot to learn on both sides of the Atlantic. True, we are not wearing traditional African clothes to be offensive. AAs do it to express our connection to and origin from the African Continent. Most of us don't have the luxury of knowing which African tribe we are from, and we only know mostly from what we see on a superficial level. Markings, furniture, clothing they all give us a sense of belonging and connection to a rich history that pre-dates the European slave trade.

But, by doing that if we are harming Black Africans and offending their culture, we should respect that and honor it. To stop this unintentional practice then maybe Black Africans can reach out to us to EDUCATE AAs about the different cultures so that we know what you know, which can only bring us closer.

I took a DNA test not long ago and my African roots stem primarily from Nigeria, with a smaller mix of a few other African countries. So I would find it helpful and interesting if more Black Africans joined Destee to share the various cultures with us.

Good topic and no need for us to be offended by it.
 

chuck

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This is good information. It opens the door for more conversations between African Americans and Black Africans. I can respect what the article is revealing as in the pulled quotes. . .

"Africans may not be as vocal as Americans when it comes to appropriation rights. And I get that Black America’s history is one marred with so many injustices that I would never claim to understand. The emergence of a unified voice that is strong and proud is one that I respect and continue to applaud, but please also understand the need for us to be heard, too. Please don’t trample our rights fighting for yours."

"If you’re not from an African tribe, please leave off wearing the tribal marks. Otherwise you’re participating in the very thing you vehemently speak out against."

"Sure we may not wear Ichafus on a day-to-day basis anymore, but that doesn’t mean their significance to us is lessened. These things are reserved for funerals, births, weddings . . . significant rites of passage — vital points in our lives that we share with our community and people. It is how we express ourselves in the collective."

It's evident that we have a lot to learn on both sides of the Atlantic. True, we are not wearing traditional African clothes to be offensive. AAs do it to express our connection to and origin from the African Continent. Most of us don't have the luxury of knowing which African tribe we are from, and we only know mostly from what we see on a superficial level. Markings, furniture, clothing they all give us a sense of belonging and connection to a rich history that pre-dates the European slave trade.

But, by doing that if we are harming Black Africans and offending their culture, we should respect that and honor it. To stop this unintentional practice then maybe Black Africans can reach out to us to EDUCATE AAs about the different cultures so that we know what you know, which can only bring us closer.

I took a DNA test not long ago and my African roots stem primarily from Nigeria, with a smaller mix of a few other African countries. So I would find it helpful and interesting if more Black Africans joined Destee to share the various cultures with us.

Good topic and no need for us to be offended by it.
My family's african ancestry is acknowledged by our oral history:

Also I've got Nigerian ancestors too!
 

chuck

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https://thsppl.com/no-one-can-take-my-africanness-away-185e227be13d#.cxkvd5dvk

"Unlike a lot of people from the diaspora, I do know my tribe. Some may say that is an advantage, but for anyone who has ever grown up on the Motherland, as it were, they will know and understand that this can also be a burden. What people fail to understand is that unlike those from the diaspora, I can never look at the elegent wrappers/kente of Ghana and decide that I prefer their styles to my tribe and wear it. It is a near unspoken rule. We have our lines and we don’t cross them."
Big props to our afro brit sista!
 

Ausura

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This is good information. It opens the door for more conversations between African Americans and Black Africans. I can respect what the article is revealing as in the pulled quotes. . .

"Africans may not be as vocal as Americans when it comes to appropriation rights. And I get that Black America’s history is one marred with so many injustices that I would never claim to understand. The emergence of a unified voice that is strong and proud is one that I respect and continue to applaud, but please also understand the need for us to be heard, too. Please don’t trample our rights fighting for yours."

"If you’re not from an African tribe, please leave off wearing the tribal marks. Otherwise you’re participating in the very thing you vehemently speak out against."

"Sure we may not wear Ichafus on a day-to-day basis anymore, but that doesn’t mean their significance to us is lessened. These things are reserved for funerals, births, weddings . . . significant rites of passage — vital points in our lives that we share with our community and people. It is how we express ourselves in the collective."

It's evident that we have a lot to learn on both sides of the Atlantic. True, we are not wearing traditional African clothes to be offensive. AAs do it to express our connection to and origin from the African Continent. Most of us don't have the luxury of knowing which African tribe we are from, and we only know mostly from what we see on a superficial level. Markings, furniture, clothing they all give us a sense of belonging and connection to a rich history that pre-dates the European slave trade.

But, by doing that if we are harming Black Africans and offending their culture, we should respect that and honor it. To stop this unintentional practice then maybe Black Africans can reach out to us to EDUCATE AAs about the different cultures so that we know what you know, which can only bring us closer.

I took a DNA test not long ago and my African roots stem primarily from Nigeria, with a smaller mix of a few other African countries. So I would find it helpful and interesting if more Black Africans joined Destee to share the various cultures with us.

Good topic and no need for us to be offended by it.
Great post. It is not necessary to appropriate African culture directly. African Americans have a distinct culture that we can be and should be proud of. We are currently 13% of the population in this country and we have had an extreme impact!
 

NNQueen

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Culture is inherently embedded in the Nigerian movies I watch...Nollywood. Many times the storyline sucks and you have to turn the volume down because they shout a lot BUT I'm fascinated by the similarities I see in their mannerisms and behavior like sucking their teeth and cutting their eyes to add emphasis to something they have an attitude about.

I can remember as a child you would get slapped or scolded if you sucked your teeth at your mama and heaven forbid what would happen if you cut your eyes. :confused: Even talking and laughing loud--that's what we do because we have a huge love for life.

AAs may have lost the language or knowledge about some of the rituals practiced by our African ancestors, or we never knew where these traits originated from, but I'm learning that there must be some connection between us that we never lost and could never lose. You can see this most clearly among Black Caribbeans but to some extent even AAs.

I don't believe we are that far removed from our native cultures as much as we might think so neither of us should be offended or be made to feel as if we are appropriating from each other. We're just doing what seems to come natural because of who we are and where we are from. :grouphug:
 
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