Black People : BIRTHRIGHT CITIZENSHIP

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by ibrahim, Nov 17, 2005.

  1. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I just want to know what your views are on this.

    Should birthright citizenship and citizenship through marriage be abolished in a country like america?
     
  2. indya

    indya Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have never understood why the US has birthright citizenship. Right now all it does is encourage illegals to enter the country and immediatally have a child. I don't know of any other country that has a law like this.

    As far as citizenship through marraige. I don't see anything controversial about this unless the person wanting citizenship gets involved in a "fake" marriage just to stay in the country.
     
  3. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You have to know that the US gets her number labour from iilegals and they also try to take advantage of that to make the unborn children citizens. And i also think every country that practices democracy has a law like that, not only the US.

    illegals don't just gets a "fake" marriage to just stay in the US, but to enjoy the rights a citizen is supposed to get and also to find make themselve better off.

    hey, what one enters the country legally?
     
  4. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I am not sure what you are asking but I believe that a "country like america" is a Settler Colony so laws regarding marriage and citizenship I view as a matter of Free Will. That is to say, so long as there is not child exploitation or a market for "mail order brides" immigration should be Open and anyone born within the borders should be granted citizenship regardless of their parents land of Nativity. I also am one to believe that laws against polygamy and polyandry need to be abolished as well. This country claims to promote cultural diversity, so be it.
     
  5. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Let's say scotish eneters america legally together with his scotish wife and bring forth children. The law automatically makes the child an america. So now i want to know if that kind of law/right should be abolished and what yur views are.
     
  6. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I support "birthrite" citizenship because I feel it's the most natural.

    If you're born on a land, then obviously it's yours regardless of what the government says.

    Which is why I call myself an AfroAmerican.

    I'm not gonna give white people...who have no business here either...the benefit of being "true Americans" while I huddle off in a corner somewhere and call myself a displaced African kitten in an oven.


    But I think citizenship through marriage should be carefully examined.

    Historically speaking, men have always guarded their supply of women in thier land.
    Foreign females were always welcomed but the men were not.

    It was like that for obvious reasons.

    Now, the situation you have in America is millions of men from Latin America and Asia are immigrating into the country and a great percentage leave their women back home and send money back to them.

    So they in a sense create an imbalance of more men that women...which means we have to compete more for our women.
    Not to mention compete over jobs.

    Then they find an American woman and snatch her up for marriage and citizenship leaving less of a supply for the native men.


    Now on top of that.....

    Take into consideration that even when both men and women from Latin America and Asia come in in equal numbers; that still will create an imbalance.

    Why?

    Because unlike Western culture where the women here are relatively free to date, marry, and associate with whomever they want....
    In most of these older societies the women are pressured to stay with their own kind and only have sexual relations with the men of thier ethnic group.
    Those women who dare journey out are usually ostracized by that group and/or labeld whores.

    But the MEN can screw as many women as they like inside and outside the group with honors.

    So the immigrant men get to choose from the women of thier group as well as the general population of women.

    While the men in the general population can only choose from women of that same general population.


    It sounds a little complicated but this has been going on all through out history.
     
  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    brother Ibrahm,

    I have no problem with the children who are born in america being considered american. Regardless of the parents nationality.
     
  8. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Good info, thanks for sharing it.
     
  9. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ibrahim

    You're welcome bro.



    Omowale

    I co-sign along with this dear brutha.
     
  10. ibrahim

    ibrahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is what Ghana's constitution has to say on citizenship.



    The Constitution

    CHAPTER THREE
    CITIZENSHIP

    6.

    (1) Every person who, on the coming into force of this Constitution, is a citizen of Ghana by law shall continue to be a citizen of Ghana.

    (2) Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, a person born in or outside Ghana after the coming into force of this Constitution, shall become a citizen of Ghana at the date of his birth if either of his parents or grandparents is or was a citizen of Ghana.

    (3) A child of not more than seven years of age found in Ghana whose parents are not know shall be presumed to be a citizen of Ghana by birth.

    (4) A child of not more than sixteen years of age neither of whose parents is a citizen of Ghana who is adopted by a citizen of Ghana shall, be virtue of the adoption, be a citizen of Ghana.

    7.

    (1) A woman married to a man who is a citizen of Ghana or a man married to a woman who is a citizen of Ghana may, upon making an application in the manner prescribed by Parliament, be registered as a citizen of Ghana.

    (2) Clause (1) of this article applies also to a person who was married to a person who, but for his or her death, would have continued to be a citizen of Ghana under clause (1) of article 6 of this Constitution.

    (3) Where the marriage of a woman is annulled after she has been registered as a citizen of Ghana under clause (1) of this article, she shall, unless she renounces that citizenship, continue to be a citizen of Ghana.

    (4) Any child of a marriage of a woman registered as a citizen of Ghana under clause (1) of this article to which clause (3) of this article applies, shall continue to be a citizen of Ghana unless he renounces that citizenship.

    (5) Where upon an application by a man for registration under clause (1) of this article, it appears to the authority responsible for the registration that a marriage has been entered into primarily with a view to obtaining the registration, the authority may request the applicant to satisfy him that the marriage was entered into in good faith; and the authority may only effect the registration upon being so satisfied.

    (6) In the case of a man seeking registration, clause (1) of this article applies only if the applicant permanently resides in Ghana.

    8.

    (1) Subject to this article, a citizen of Ghana Shall cease forthwith to be a citizen of Ghana if, on attaining the age of twenty-one years, he, by a voluntary act, other than marriage, acquired or retains the citizenship of a country other than Ghana.

    (2) A person who becomes a citizen of Ghana by registration and immediately after the day on which he becomes a citizen of Ghana is also a citizen of some other country, shall cease to be a citizen of Ghana unless he has renounced his citizenship of that other country, taken the oath of allegiance specified in the Second Schedule to this Constitution and made and registered such declaration of his intentions concerning residence as may be prescribed by law, or unless he has obtained an extension of time for taking those steps and the extended period has not expired.

    (3) A Ghanaian citizen who loses his Ghanaian citizenship as a result of the acquisition or possession of the citizenship of a country other than Ghana shall, on the renunciation of his citizenship of that other country, become a citizen of Ghana.

    (4) Where the law of a country, other than Ghana, requires a person who marries a citizen of that country to renounce the citizenship of his own country by virtue of that marriage, a citizen of Ghana who is deprived of his citizenship of Ghana by virtue of that marriage shall, on the dissolution of that marriage, if he thereby loses his citizenship acquired by that marriage, become a citizen of Ghana.

    9.

    (1) Parliamentary may make provision for the acquisition of citizenship of Ghana by persons who are not eligible to become citizens of Ghana under the provision of this Constitution.

    (2) Except as otherwise provided in article 7 of this Constitution, a person shall not be registered as a citizen of Ghana unless at the time of his application for registration he is able to speak and understand an indigenous language of Ghana.

    (3) The High Court may, on an application made for the purpose by the Attorney-General, deprive a person who is a citizen of Ghana, otherwise than by birth, of that citizenship on the ground.

    (a) that the activities of that person are inimical of the security of the State or prejudicial to public morality or the public interest; or

    (b) that the citizenship was acquired by fraud, misrepresentation or any other improper or irregular practice.

    (4) There shall be published in the Gazette by the appropriate authority and within three months after the application or the registration, as the case may be, the name,. particulars and other details of a person who, under this article applies to be registered as a citizen of Ghana or has been registered as a citizen of Ghana.

    (5) Parliament may make provision for the renunciation by any person of his citizenship of Ghana.

    10.

    (1) A reference in this Chapter to the citizenship of the parent of a person at the time of the birth of that person shall, in relation to a person born after the death of the parent, be construed as a reference to the citizenship of the parent at the time of the parent's death.

    (2) For the purposes of clause (1) of this article, where the death occurred before the coming into force of this Constitution, the citizenship that the parent would have had if he or she had died on the coming into force of this Constitution shall be deemed to be his or her citizenship at the time of his or her death.
     
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