Black Women : "Birthing Hips??"

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by cherryblossom, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    First, there are many factors which could influence a "hard" or "softer" labor/delivery.

    And, being "skinny" or "slim" does not guarantee you a difficult delivery nor an easy one.

    Also, increased fear/anxiety and tension can affect labor/delivery as well.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    MONDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2008
    "She's got good birthin' hips"!
    “She’s got great birthing hips”! Have you heard that one before?

    I see the following questions all over the net:
    My hips are small, (insert measurement size) can I give birth naturally?
    I know a women with really wide hips, and she ended up with a cesarean - what happened?
    If you have big hips is child birth easier?
    Can a woman's hips be too small for a vaginal delivery?
    ....

    [​IMG]

    ...You see those Micky Mouse ears on that pelvis? That is the ilium, and that is what we think of as the hip bone. Now the ilium comes in all different sizes. But the size of that iliac area does not have anything to do with birthing babies. When it comes to birthing, it’s the size and shape of that round hole in the middle of the pelvis that counts - but keep reading, because there is more to that than meets the eye. The main hole in the middle of the pelvis is called the pelvic inlet. This is where the True Pelvis begins. There is much more to the anatomy of the true pelvis, but I’m going to skip it, dare I bore you to death. The True Pelvis is what is measured during a medical assessment. Let’s pretend we are comparing two different women. The size of hip bones (the ilium and iliac crest) might be quite large, and in the other, they may be much smaller, but their pelvic inlet may be the same size. So we can’t go by the measurements of our waist - or the size and shape of our pelvis. But guess what else? Measuring the pelvic inlet is ALSO not a big help! Even with the help of x-rays, and presumably accurate measurements we cannot predict the passage of a baby through that pelvis. Here is it where it get’s *really* interesting.

    What most people do not understand is that the pelvis is not an immovable structure. We tend to imagine the pelvis as something solid and some believe it is one giant bone. There are four joints that join different pelvic bones together. During pregnancy and labor the hormone relaxin softens and relaxes the ligaments that join the pelvic bones, allowing the pelvis to give and 'stretch'. Look at the above picture again - this time focus on where it says “pubic arch”. In between the two bones that meet there in the front lies a pad of cartilage. This is symphysis pubis. In some women there can become a pretty good gap there. It can be painful towards the end of pregnancy when this happens. However, my point is to show you that the pelvis can “open”. Look at the picture below and check out the ligaments attached to the various parts of the pelvis.


    The story continues. There is one more thing we must consider. The baby. A baby’s head is made up of several bones - and they are made to overlap during birth. This is what causes molding. No one, not even a doctor, can tell a women how much the babies head will mold - or how much a woman’s pelvis will relax to accommodate that baby. The *only* way is to try it.

    Women are told all the time that they have a pelvis that is too small. They end up with an automatic cesarean without a trial of labor, only to give birth to the next child - much bigger in size, vaginally. Just ‘google’ the many stories! The diagnosis of CPD (cephalopelvic disproportion - meaning babies head is too big compared to the size of the pelvis) is given out way to often - sometimes before the birth, and sometimes after a long labor followed by a cesarean. A long labor, and even a long pushing stage is not an indicator of a small pelvis/big baby. Often these same mothers give birth to their subsequent children who are much bigger. Labors stall for other reasons. This diagnosis gives women doubts in their bodies, and then they pass these doubts on to other women. A woman who is a size 20 and has a nice large hips is told she cannot give birth naturally to her 6 pound baby. She tells the woman who is a size 5, with ‘smaller hips’, and then this poor women doubts her ability to give birth. Next thing we know, we have women measuring their hips, and wondering if they will have a harder or longer labor - and they are scared of a baby bigger than X pounds.

    I write this because there are so many women out there questioning their ability to give birth. I don’t know if doctors are afraid of lawsuits, or what - but why is there such an increase in this ‘problem’? I’m just really glad that there are women out there that go ahead and say “YES I CAN!”. It is because of these women that we know that this diagnosis is often wrong -perhaps to error on the safe side of a lawsuit.


    http://thebirthteacher.blogspot.com/2008/12/shes-got-good-birthin-hips.html
     
  3. largo

    largo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Very good info cherryblossom. Stefia, staying in shape and staying flexible and learning proper breathing techniques to use when in labor can help. Every labor experience will be different. Some women even say it didn't really hurt. I wanted the Doc to shoot me. It was terribly painful. Some deliveries are fairly quick and some take hours. You just never really know until you get there. Just take care of yourself and stay in shape. Also, some positions are more comfortable than others during labor. For me being on my back was the worst.
     
  4. StefiA

    StefiA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks for the info. To be honest I've always been a bit worried about this ever since we had to watch the vid of a live birth in sex ed way back like 10 years ago now - I remember thinking at the time 'OMG - no way' and then when I was told it might be even worse because of my size....
    But it looks from the info like that's going to have nothing to do with it really. Luckily I am quite flexible - like I can do the splits front and sidewards - the result of 7+ years of Tai Chi & Chi Gung training (those are like soft martial arts styles that aren't all macho and aggressive) - so that might well help.
    Must admit I never even knew there were different positions - like every time you see a birth in a soap or whatever the girl is always on her back - I suppose you could do it squatting like when you have to take a pee when your out in the wild?
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Like Largo said, staying active during a pregnancy helps and the breathing as well during labor/delivery.

    Yes, some women are put on "Bed Rest" during their pregnancies, but that is usually due to other medical issues, not just weight/size.

    I've known many skinny/slim women who POP OUT babies like a gumball machine. lol (and some heavier women too)

    And I've known some who did have hard labor/deliveries.

    Just don't internalize EVERY woman's experience as being what will happen to YOU.
     
  6. StefiA

    StefiA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks - you both gave some good advice - and I don't feel like such a clutz for asking the question after seeing from that article that lots of other women have thought they might have the same problem. This is all the kind of stuff we should have done in sex ed rather than just being shown some vid of a woman screaming her head off in agony with just a brief description of the mechanics of it all.
     
  7. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    sister cherryblossom you nailed it sis
    I know lots of small thin built women who gave birth easy like they
    just slid out no problem and i know one young lady
    who had bo-hips who had a very hard time !


    The structure of the body and how you carry it , treat it makes all the different.
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Yes, Bro. Rich, no two women are exactly the same.

    ...not even in the same family.

    Sometimes a woman will have difficult pregnancies and long, hard labor but her own daughter may not when she has a baby. (or vice versa)

    ....even with sisters, it's not always the same.
     
  9. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    True ........So why do some call or say birthing hips when women without hips bo
    can deliver easy and smooth as well have a hard time giving birth.

    So is it really in the Hips ?

    Or is it the structure of the body ??
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    It's a combination of different things.

    But, how WIDE or NARROW a woman's hips are is not necessarily the reason for "easy" or "hard" labor/deliveries.


     
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