Black People : Bill Cosby's Course of Action

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Blackbird, Jul 3, 2004.

  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Greetings Fam,

    This whole Bill Cosby debacle has got me enraged. I try to be practical and pragmatic. I don't really concern myself with words and rhetoric without works to stand behind it. As I said in a previous thread, we can debate the appropriateness and veracity of Bill's statements until the cows come home, but what does that do for us?

    I want to address something. That is education.

    /education/ - n. 1. The act or process of educating or being educated.
    2. The knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process.

    /educated/ - adj. 2a. Showing evidence of schooling, training, or experience. b. Having or exhibiting cultivation; cultured:

    /educate/ - v. [ME educaten, fr. L ducre, ductus, fr. L. ducre, to lead out, bring up] 1. To develop the innate capacities of, especially by schooling or instruction.

    /innate/ - adj. [ME innat, fr. L inntus, past participle of innsc, to be born in : in-, in; see in–2 + nsc, to be born; see gen- in] 1. Possessed at birth; inborn.
    2. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent.

    /latent/ - adj. [ME, fr. OF, fr. L latns, latent-, present participle of latre, to lie hidden] 1. Present or potential but not evident or active

    What we are receiving in Eurocentric schools is not education, it is rote learning. Undoubtably, in order to be "successful" in Western society, we do need the learning that can be obtained between the stale and sterilized walls of inorganic concrete building, but again I emphasize, "successful" in Western society.

    The Hiphop group Dead Prez once said in their song "F@#k Dey Schoolz" that school isn't teaching how to better relate with our families, how to pay our bills and how to get crack out the ghetto; it's only teaching us how to build up white people's stuff. One friend of mine, a conscious former historian for the Association of Black Psychologists - San Diego chapter, said we have more degreed Black folks than ever, but even with all these degrees we can not mitigate the sufferings of Black folk. He said we have Black economists, but they can't devise ways to boost the Black economic condition.

    In his book "Of Water and the Spirit", Malidoma Some speaks about Baor, the Dagara indigenous initiation and education ceremony, and has some insightful words to convey. He writes, "Each one of us possessed a center that he had grown away from after birth. To be born was to lose contact with our center, and to grow from childhood to adulthood was to walk away from it.

    "The center is both within and without. It is everywhere. But we must realize it exists, find it, and be with it, for without the center we cannot tell who we are, where we come from, and where we are going."

    The above statements, to me, describe to a tee the previous definition of education. We do not receive any of this is Western school and nothing in the schools will reveal this (our center) to us.

    To be continued.....

    Blackbird
     
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Now here's the plan: (a very basic outline - hopefully others will contribute)

    1. Everyone concerned about the status of our future should get with a few like-minded individuals and organized study cells, if there aren't any already in your city.

    2. Make a conscious decision to study not only Afrikan history, but also indigenous systems of education, initiation and rites of passage. Also get a clear understanding of what culture is and its functions. Study, as well, European cultural thought and philosophy. Some works that may be helpful are:

    a. Yurugu by Marimba Ani (presently out of print)
    b. Afrikan Power by Asa Hilliard
    c. Of Water and Spirit and The Healing Wisdom of Africa by Malidoma Some'
    d. Cultural Misorientation by Kobi Kambon
    e. Nationbuilding: Theory & Practice in Afrikan Centered Education and The Sankofa Movement: ReAfrikanization and the Reality of War by K. Agyei and Akua Nson Akoto
    f. Blueprint for Black Power and Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children by Amos Wilson
    g. Afrocentric Theory and Applications: Adolescent Rites of Passage and Afrocentric Theory and Application: Advances in Adolescent Rites of Passage by Nsenga Warfield-Coppock

    3. Work on developing a charter and applying for 501(c)3 status

    4. Develop technical skills, such as grant and proposal writing, marketing and public relations

    5. Creating a regional network to coordinate efforts

    6. Engage in fundraising campaigns

    Blackbird
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    31,990
    Likes Received:
    11,477
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,731
    also Fannon?, Orwell?, Uncle Tom's Cabin?
     
  4. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Yes, Brother. Fanz Fanon is a definite addition. Thanks for the heads up!

    Blackbird
     
  5. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2002
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +5
    Thanks so much Blackbird. I have to run, but you know I'll be back...this thread and a few others have to thrive. Let's stop preaching and start doing.
     
  6. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2002
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +5
    Blackbird,
    You have been here for a while, and I won't beat around the bush with you about how I feel. I know that you are truly one of Our Warriors and I respect that and you with the uptmost.

    You know that I have a problem with the African stint...I have talked about it enough, so I won't go into further detail; and if you are a Pan-Africanist that is cool with me, it is just not where I lay on the matter.

    Other than that, I think that you are once again taking this discussion to these boards--- there are others who are written alot on these matters just like you, and get upset, because when We start talking plans of actions... many of Us run and hide... I cannot put my finger on why. Some of Us have even delved into reasons why We are like this. The reasons range from fear, to not caring, to being lazy.

    I think that Our kids, in this country have to learn the truth about their existence in this country. They have to understand that coming from nothing-literally to the place where We are is TREMENDOUS! That in this world, there are no people who can compare. They have to be taught how We survived (the good, bad and the ugly); and letting them decide how they want to see that history of survival. They have to be taught the struggles... the mistakes... and expected to take that history and build upon it, in every manner possible and not be afraid to think outside of the box... Just Do It.

    Most of all they have to be taught self-love.

    Down here. We think that before moving on, We have to make people aware of what they got... and how to hold onto it. They have to take pride and want to keep things first. We have hit a road block. In this era of everyday castigation of the black community We do not want to alienate or hurt certain segments of Our communities--but some truths have come up... and We are dithering on how exactly to handle it.

    Sorry, got to run. I will finish this.
     
  7. Changes_Changes

    Changes_Changes Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    59
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +59
    Thank you, Brother Blackbird, for highlighting an issue that we cannot afford to ignore. And thank you, Sister Happy, for you shrewd and important contribution.

    Before we proceed, though, it's important to clarify the relationship between our African lineage and the education of Africans here in the u.s. Sister Happy, each point you raised -- appreciating the singularity of our survival and prosperity despite institutionalized white supremacy, the necessity for high self-regard, and identifying and maintaining that which is ours -- is an indispensable one. Believing, however, that we came from nothing -- "literally" -- constitutes an incomplete assessment of our history. If it is true that we came from nothing, then it is also true -- as euro centrists believe -- that the history of the African began with her encounter with the european; and if we did not exist before european conquest, then where from this ingenuity, this unbelievable will to survive, indeed, the very stark cultural divide between African and european? Did we make it anew from air in 1619?

    I don't raise these points to nitpick. But, to the extent that we have maintained artifacts and by-products of our African cultures, we are still African. And it is irresponsible and short-sighted to assume that we can educate the African without fully appreciating her Africanity. Identifying and defining our African cultural artifacts may be either or both a necessary preface or/and a continual correlative to reviving our African educations.
     
  8. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 3, 2002
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ratings:
    +5

    When I say that We came from nothing, I meant, that We didn't migrate here, We were sold. We were striped of language, and "culture" per se; We came here naked---literally and figuratively. That is what I meant. I was not saying that We are nothing. And to come from that place to where We are; even though We have made some mistakes... I was thinking in terms of comparison, from where all others who came here...how they came. Of course with the exception of Native Americans.

    I am not African. That is the way I feel. I am quite comfortable with being of African descent... and for me that is where I draw the line. Maybe your mindthink is right; I'm just not going to go there. I cherish the blood... I cannot cherish the cause of it.
     
  9. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Sista Happy,

    I'm not following you. I'm not won-over Afrikan as I understand the differences between us due to experience, time and distance, however, I subscribe to the notion of Sankofa. If nothing was broke with our communities we would not be here discussing solutions and plans of action. Why?

    No one's trying to make you "Afrikan" and I'm comfortably fine with your conclusion. What I'm suggesting is that there may be a blueprint to follow by studying our ancestral traditions.

    As I've stated before I was a former gangmember and know some of the reasons why many of our youth engage in destructive behavior. I think the possible answers to the plague may lie within our ancestral cultural traditions. No, I'm no advocate to "playing Afrikan", but I think through the de-africanization process I discussed in another thread, we lost some vital elements to maintaining a healthy and productive cultural construct.

    Gangs are the new-world representative of the age-set groups of Afrikan initiation ceremonies. Most young people become involved in gangs around the age 13 which coincidences with roughly the age of initiation in indigenous Afrikan societies. At this age, puberty is making its onset and the production of testosterone is beginning. Therefore, you have young boys feeling more aggressive and trying to assert their manhood. These age-sets serve as a bonding experience from boys as their grow in male comraderie and what-not. However, the boys do not monitor themselves. No. They are under the supervision of seasoned elders who provide community instruction with rigorous tests embedded to channel their newly found expansive energy into positive experiences of enlightenment and growth. They are also introduced to the mystical, in efforts of developing themselves personally.

    We, as Black folk in America, on the other hand do not have effective cultural institutions to provide our youth with these types of experiences so our young sway to gang membership and identification. The gang serves the needs of the young male, giving him a sense of identity and belonging, as well as, serves as an avenue to mete out his aggression requirements. The gang does not, however, serves as a positive and constructive medium and does not teach the youth how to temper (cool) their aggression and rage. We have kids going through an initiation and rites of passage with no positive resolution. So what happens? We have young people, disempowered, growing up to become adults still filled with uncontrollable rage. The American experience helps to intensify this with notions of individualism, materialism and dis-community.

    I could continue but.....

    Sankofa - It is not taboo to return and fetch what you forgot.

    Blackbird
     
  10. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Again, food for thought.

    He writes, "Each one of us possessed a center that he had grown away from after birth. To be born was to lose contact with our center, and to grow from childhood to adulthood was to walk away from it. The center is both within and without. It is everywhere. But we must realize it exists, find it, and be with it, for without the center we cannot tell who we are, where we come from, and where we are going."

    Blackbird
     
Loading...