Black Authors : Bigotry and the Afrocentric Jazz Evolution

Discussion in 'Short Stories - Authors - Writing' started by cherryblossom, Mar 16, 2010.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Bigotry and the Afrocentric Jazz Evolution

    by Karlton E. Hester

     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you sister Cherryblossom!!

    And God bless you, and I assume my thanks will represent all fans of Jazz music of African descent.
    When folks put on Itunes with it's 50+ jazz stations there are practically none that I am aware of that are Black and just like here on WBGO, there seems to be an overemphasis of white artists and practically a darn boycott, on Afrocentric artists like, Yusef Lateef, Archie Shepp, Pharoah Sanders, Sun Ra, Carlos Garnett, Alice Coltrane, and Lonnie Liston Smith.

    Now that Harlem has been regentrified, the Black clubs that used to hallmark young artists, are catering for a white audience with watered down material.

    Jazz is black, and there are hundreds of White artists who can play this Black music with thier heart, but what is being promoted and fostered in the major clubs is that watered down fusion stuff, like Chris Botti.
    And WBGO the premier NYC station has made serious efforts to turn the cafe' au lait, into a cup of hot milk, by putting white artists doing cafe society torch songs, on as if they are categorized as jazz.

    Just like the white owned radio refusing to play Conscious Raising rap, and stations refusing to play Afrocentric jazz,

    we need our own stations more then ever, to give a venue to the new up and coming artists and preserve the legacy of the Black Jazz Masters of the 60s and 70s.
     
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