Black People : BET CEO own kids don't watch BET

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by raheem934, Sep 16, 2007.

  1. raheem934

    raheem934 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2004
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    14
    Ratings:
    +14
    Debra Lee kids do not watch BET

    Staff Writer

    2007-09-15

    .www.******************* .

    Debra Lee is the current CEO of BET. Lee's District of Columbia home was recently visited by protesters. Although the fall is protest season in the Capital of the United States, Lee is on the fall protest map. Doing an interview with a Dr. Faye Williams, it was discovered that Lee does not allow her own children to watch bet or , Lee's kids choose not to watch BET. It appears that Lee is just collecting a pay check and not too concerned about the kids that watch BET. The video is below of the street level interview with Dr. Williams.

    http://www.*******************/newspage/330.php?artileid=330
     
  2. BlackMamba

    BlackMamba Active Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2007
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1
    Neither do my children.
     
  3. Lrae

    Lrae Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2015
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    76
    Location:
    Indiana, USA
    Home Page:
    Ratings:
    +134
    Viacom Inc., the media powerhouse that owns CBS and the MTV and Nickelodeon cable TV channels, paid the black founders of BET Robert and Sheila Johnson $2.3 billion back in 2001, to program whatever they wish, just like they do on their other stations! In a 2010 interview, Sheila ( the 1st black female billionaire) said that she herself is "ashamed" of what the network has become. "I don’t watch it. I suggest to my kids that they don't watch it," she said. "When we started BET, it was going to be the Ebony magazine on television. We had public affairs programming. We had news... I had a show called Teen Summit, we had a large variety of programming, but the problem is that then the video revolution started up... And then something started happening, and I didn't like it at all. And I remember during those days we would sit up and watch these videos and decide which ones were going on and which ones were not. We got a lot of backlash from recording artists...and we had to start showing them. I didn’t like the way women were being portrayed in these videos." It just ain't the same station!
     
Loading...