Black Parenting : Benefits for Kids Whom Play Instruments

Discussion in 'Black Parenting' started by MsInterpret, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Benefits for Kids Whom Play Instruments

    A music curriculum is an important component of a well-rounded education, writes Stephanie Stein Crease, author of "Music Lessons: Guide Your Child to Play a Musical Instrument (and Enjoy It!)." When your child plays a musical instrument, he benefits from mastering a new skill through exposure to many different types of music. Your child will receive the multiple benefits of becoming musically talented no matter what instrument he chooses. Encourage your child to practice his own selections of music so he truly enjoys the experience and gains the most from it.
    Increases Self-Esteem

    According to Beth Luey and Stella Saperstein, authors of "The Harmonious Child: Every Parent's Guide to Musical Instruments, Teachers, and Lessons," learning to play a musical instrument boosts your child's self-esteem as she masters a new skill. When your child plays an instrument of her choice, whether she is a beginner or an expert, she experiences the sensation of doing something entertaining for herself and others. As she learns additional skills that allow her to play well, her self-esteem will increase as she discovers that she is able to reproduce musical selections on her instrument.
    Enhances Learning

    Luey and Saperstein write that playing a musical instrument can help boost your child's academic performance in the classroom. When learning to play a musical instrument, your child is exposed to rhythm and counting that can help him improve his understanding of many different subjects, particularly the concepts presented in mathematics. Music can also improve your child's study skills, attention to detail and ability to memorize and repeat important facts.
    Promotes Community

    When your child plays an instrument, chances are she performs with other children who are both older and younger than she is. Crease reports that playing music as a group builds a sense of community and enables your child to feel as if she belongs to something bigger than herself. Working on playing music in harmony with other children will help your child learn about working as a team and will motivate her to work harder so she does not let her peers down. Cooperating for the purpose of a common goal is a skill that children need as they get older and playing a musical instrument is a powerful way to show your child the value of cooperating with others.
     
  2. Mikha'el

    Mikha'el Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    i myself enjoy all music. frm hip hop to classical i play it all n intend to learn the piano n guitar when i can afford the time n $

    my kids will learn instruments. i shall imbed upon them the love of music ^_^
     
  3. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    I agree sister and it's been shown to be true ............
     
  4. MimiBelle

    MimiBelle Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Cooperation won't factor in at that age. Not really. You're still a lone-pracitioner spending dedicating hours to practice every night. I used to practice 6 hours a day...after school. Had a callous on my thumb and a sore on my bottom lip (embouchre).
    I played the clarinet for about 13 or 14 years...from age 8. Screw what you heard about saxes, honey.
    The clarinet is THE jazz instrument! *laugh*


    At first, you play it because it's required. You want to and you've scales and techniques to master. Musical concepts to understand. It's not so much about the other kids. It's about you, the budding solitary musician. At this time, it's all competition.

    With time, you learn that the whole is the sum of it's part...but you'll be in music for a while before that happens.
    You don't truly begin to work as a team until 'marching band' or 'solo ensemble' contests...where you compete for ratings. Lots of marching/horn carriage. Lots of struggling. Lots of togetherness. You spend the bulk of your free-time/school-time and a portion of your summer, i.e., Summer Band,etc...with those kids.
    ...but when you and your 200-piece band or group score a superior rating and qualify for state? It's wonderful.
    Lifelong friendships develop.
    I still speak to my orchestra friends. Some of them still play. One went on to study music. Another (french horn player) plays with her mother's group.

    Went to my 10 year reunion 2 years ago and it was just like highschool. A bazillion ex-band-kids in the spot. Holding court....*laugh* We just picked up where we left off.

    *********
    A love of learning?
    I don't know - but the band kids usually made up the bulk of the Gifted/Talented program and AP/Honors classes. Coincidence? Who knows....*laugh*
    It was definitely stereotypical, i.e., band-geeks...
    I don't believe that studying music will make a child anything. The child usually has it in them to begin with....
    A driven and motivated child will be, whether they study music or not.

    *********

    Enhances self esteem?
    Maybe? I suppose so. Not everyone can play an instrument...and fewer still can do so very well. To master a piece or finally execute a particular run or technique or particular piece (this kid's good. Check out the head bobbin! Cocky...but he has something to be cocky about *laugh*) with efficiency (after HOURS of practice) tends to make you feel really good.

    *********

    The sense of something greater than I? Oh, yeah...
    This the ENTIRE 9th.

    It's one thing to listen to great music and quite another to play it. Music just makes you 'feel'...period. It's the expression of the soul and it's something that you play with your being.
    The voice is an instrument...I might add. Sadly, everyone isn't blessed to be a singer...fewer still are NATURALLY good.
    So, the next best thing is an instrument. *laugh*
    Words aren't necessary, but I tell you this: I've nearly been converted listening to Gregorian Chants...and regular religious music. *laugh*
    'Miserere mei, deus' (have mercy on me, oh god).
     
  5. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    I think it's a good thing to introduce as much as possible to children, broadening their horizons, music included!

    From what i've heard though ... music is and has been on most public schools chopping blocks for some time.

    If you want your child to have this added dimension in their life, it's gonna cost money and time.

    My children's GrandParents helped in this area, as i was a single Mother, and feeding them was a challenge.

    They've not made musical careers from their training, but learned a lot, and maybe their children will.

    My Daughter will be singing and playing guitar at her friend's wedding later this year.

    Love You!

    :heart:

    Destee
     
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