Awo Dino - Do Not Add Property That Belongs To Others Without Their Permission

Discussion in 'Violators and Violations (Possible Ones)' started by awo dino, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    For gogounited:

    Data Shows Nigerians The Most Educated In The U.S.


    BACHELOR'S AND BEYOND
    In America, Nigerians' education pursuit is above rest
    Whether driven by immigration or family, data show more earn degrees
    By LESLIE CASIMIR Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle
    May 20, 2008, 2:11AM
    .
    ERIC KAYNE CHRONICLE
    Nigerian David Olowokere, chairman of TSU's engineering technologies department, says the goal for his children is to do "as good as us — if not better."

    For Woodlands resident David Olowokere, one of Nigeria's sons, having a master's degree in engineering just wasn't enough for his people back home. So he got a doctorate.

    His wife, Shalewa Olowokere, a civil engineer, didn't stop at a bachelor's, either. She went for her master's.

    The same obsession with education runs in the Udeh household in Sugar Land. Foluke Udeh and her husband, Nduka, both have master's degrees. Anything less, she reckons, would have amounted to failure.

    "If you see an average Nigerian family, everybody has a college degree these days," said Udeh, 32, a physical therapist at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center. "But a post-graduate degree, that's like pride for the family."

    Nigerian immigrants have the highest levels of education in this city and the nation, surpassing whites and Asians, according to Census data bolstered by an analysis of 13 annual Houston-area surveys conducted by Rice University.

    Although they make up a tiny portion of the U.S. population, a whopping 17 percent of all Nigerians in this country held master's degrees while 4 percent had a doctorate, according to the 2006 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. In addition, 37 percent had bachelor's degrees.


    In comparison
    To put those numbers in perspective, 8 percent of the white population in the U.S. had master's degrees, according to the Census survey. And 1 percent held doctorates. About 19 percent of white residents had bachelor's degrees. Asians come closer to the Nigerians with 12 percent holding master's degrees and 3 percent having doctorates.

    The Nigerian numbers are "strikingly high," said Roderick Harrison, demographer at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a Washington, D.C., think tank that specializes in researching black issues. "There is no doubt that these are highly educated professionals who are probably working in the petrochemical, medical and business sectors in Houston."

    Harrison analyzed the census data for the Houston Chronicle.

    Stephen Klineberg, a sociologist at Rice University who conducts the annual Houston Area Survey, suspects the percentage of Nigerian immigrants with post-graduate degrees is higher than Census data shows.

    Of all the Nigerian immigrants he reached in his random phone surveys 1994 through 2007 — 45 households total — Klineberg said 40 percent of the Nigerians said they had post-graduate degrees.

    "These are higher levels of educational attainment than were found in any other ... community," Klineberg said.

    There are more than 12,000 Nigerians in Houston, according to the latest Census data, a figure sociologists and Nigerian community leaders say is a gross undercount. They believe the number to be closer to 100,000.


    Staying in school
    The reasons Nigerians have more post-graduate degrees than any other racial or ethnic group are largely due to Nigerian society's emphasis on mandatory and free education. Once immigrating to this country, practical matters of immigration laws get in the way.

    The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 made it easier for Africans to enter the U.S., but mostly as students or highly skilled professionals — not through family sponsorships, Klineberg said.

    So many Africans pursue higher levels of education as an unintended consequence of navigating the tricky minefield of immigration, said Amadu Jacky Kaba, an associate professor at Seton Hall University in South Orange, N.J., who has done research on African immigrants in the U.S.

    "In a way, it's a Catch-22 — because of immigration laws you are forced to remain in school, but then the funny thing is you end up getting your doctorate at the age of 29," Kaba said. "If you stay in school, immigration will leave you alone."

    Although Kaba, who teaches Africana Studies, is not from Nigeria (he is Liberian), he said he, too, found himself pursuing a master's and then a doctorate to remain in this country legally.

    But not all Africans have to go this route. Some say their motivation is driven by their desire to overcome being a double minority: black and African.

    Take Oluyinka Olutoye, 41, associate professor of pediatric surgery at Baylor College of Medicine. He came to this country already as a medical doctor but decided to pursue his doctorate in anatomy to help set himself apart.

    "Being black, you are already at a disadvantage," said Olutoye, whose wife, Toyin Olutoye, is an anesthesiologist at Baylor. "You really need to excel far above if you want to be considered for anything in this country."


    Family expectations
    All this talk of education creates high expectations for children of Nigerian immigrants. The eldest child of David Olowokere, chairman of the engineering technologies department at Texas Southern University, for example, is already working on her master's degree in public health in Atlanta; the middle child is pursuing a bachelor's in pre-medicine. His youngest, a son, attends The Woodlands High School. He already has aspirations to go into engineering, just like his parents, Olowokere beams.

    "The goal is for them to do as good as us — if not better," he said.

    Oluyinka Olutoye put it another way.

    "The typical saying in a Nigerian household is that the best inheritance that a parent can give you is not jewelry or cash or material things, it is a good education," he said. "It is expected."
     
  2. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Awo Dino ... did you not understand any of this exchange?

    I ask because you have done the exact same thing that i just warned you about.

    Do you see how frustrating this is for me, us, the managers of this community?

    I would not tell a child the same thing, over and over again, without consequence ... yet you want me to do this for you, an adult.

    What part of, this is not allowed here, do you not understand?

    You feel like i'm targeting you, but you keep violating the rules ... how many times should i ask you or another the same thing?

    Help me understand Brother.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  3. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Are you talking about the news article?
    This is a news article with the date and everything else included. Why would anyone need to get permission to post a news article?
    I am not out to willfully violate rules. We gotta be able to post news articles. There are several other threads right now with news articles.
    I don't understand
    :10500:


     
  4. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister Destee,
    I am truly perplexed by this one. Again, news articles are posted here all the time. News articles are part of the public domain. They are used by all sorts of people in all sorts of ways. If news articles also must be backed up with written permission of the author, then this must be a new thing, 'cuase it isn't in the rules, and has been going on as long as I've been here. If I am childish because I can't keep up with the changes, then I guess I am childish. If news articles are now to be considered private property, then what about youtube videos. If I want to post a poem by Shakespeare do I have to get permission from his surviving family? Where are you going with this? I haven't been this confused since my first day in grad school.
     
  5. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Grad school? Wow... Just kidding elder.
     
  6. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Awo Dino ... did you even bother to read the rules - #2 specifically? All of your questions are answered within them.

    We talked and talked about this, only for you to do the exact same thing again.

    This is not a new rule, in fact, it is one of our oldest rules ... almost as old as the community.

    How about you read the rules ... see if your question is answered, and if it isn't ... let me know and i'll answer it ... okay?

    After all of our exchange, you walked away saying "duly noted" as if you understood ... yet here we are again.

    Maybe we should put this in another thread ... in an effort not to muddy this one up ... i'll do the honors.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  7. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    O.K., the rules do say "news." I hadn't read them in awhile and made an assumption. i should have just put a piece of it with the link. Made a stupid assumption that news articles are in a different class. Honest mistake. Sorry to get on yer nerve.
    I do feel stupid now. Again, my apologies. I accept responsibility.


     
  8. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Awo Dino ... Thank You ... looking forward to never having to speak to you about this again.

    Love You! :grouphug:

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  9. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I promise, sister. you have been very patient with me. This is the first site and only site I have ever participated in, believe it or not, so I'm behind the curve. I re-read the rules on posting material. By the way, I have emails with permission from authors whose writings i've posted, like the one from Mr. Adepoju. Is email permission good enough, say if i cut and paste the email?
     
  10. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Yes Brother Awo Dino ... that is sufficient ... i'd just caution that you might not want to post their email address too, as it may cause their address to be harvested and added to spam lists.

    I think it's great and wonderful to ask owners permission to use their work. Whenever i have taken the time to ask, every author has shown great appreciation for the consideration, as most people do just use their stuff without ever acknowledging them to such a degree. I know if i was the author, i'd appreciate being asked.

    Plus, many Sisters and Brothers are trying to make a living with their work, words, articles, stories, poetry, etc., and if we just put them on web sites ... without even asking them ... removing any chance of them receiving financial compensation ... we hinder / hurt their ability to make money from their own work. Let them be the ones to tell us, that it's okay for us to do this to them, by asking them in advance.

    I've gotten lots of flack about this rule over the years, and i'm still convinced it's the right thing to do.

    We gotta do the right thing when it comes to our people, their property, etc., and that is all i'm trying to manifest here.

    I love you Brother Awo Dino ... glad you're with us ... and look forward to enjoying you in the great discussions we have here, and not fussing at you any more ... :love:

    Thanks a Bunch!

    :heart:

    Destee

    whispering ... this too is something we learn as children, not to use the property of others without their permission ... just for the record

    ::
    ::
     
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