Science and Technology : Atom, ARM, and BS...a rant

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by 360, Dec 22, 2009.

  1. 360

    360 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Or rather
    Why Netbooks(or whatever people want to call them)Suck

    Sure, some people are very happy with their atombooks and atomtops, and if they like it, I luuurve it.

    Do they beat your standard hungry, bloated beast?
    SURE.
    Would it be better to have more of them in use than beasts?
    Absolutely!
    Are they capable?
    Sure. Sure.

    Regardless, they aren't much better than your standard piece of junk. They are a total joke when viable, sensibly-designed ARM machines are NOT some fantasy or wild idea.

    Pardon the rant, but it's kind of disgusting for someone to suggest these things are some kind of gift or advancement when they're basically like hybrid SUVs or like someone sawing off part of a Hummer and patting themselves on the back.

    Again, I don't deny that many people are and can be served very well by these devices. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be pointing at the pink elephant in the flipping room.

    And another thing, they don't make quality pocket-protectors anymore!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    They are when ARM processes aren't supported by the most mainstream operating system on the market. ARM processes are great and have been performing very well in smartphones and other devices. They've had much more niche time than the giant known as Intel. Is Microsoft gonna port Windows (besides CE) to ARM? It's unlikely. For the most part, it'll have to be in netbooks that ship with Linux. Linux has to win the atom-based netbook (and smartphone w/ droid for a halo effect) to gain the support it needs so vendors can justify rolling out ARM netbooks. We also shouldn't forget VIA which could enter the competition under the same shift. It'll be interesting to see how the netbook and e-reader war plays out. It's been pretty clear that Intel and Microsoft don't want to lose and they've already started playing dirty.
     
  3. 360

    360 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What do you base your theory on?

    Micro$oft wanted to kill XP a while ago, and certainly didn't want to release Doze 7 when and how it did, so...

    O/T

    Don't you think your screen name is completely inappropriate?
     
  4. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The "theory" is based on the fact that Windows (besides CE) doesn't support ARM. Netbooks are aimed at mostly casual everyday users and that's the OS of choice for now. Even if it's not XP which is immensely favored, the average consumer would try rather migrate to another Windows OS. Linux netbooks are selling quite well, and if they continue to grow -- there's a good chance for ARM. There's no incentive otherwise, especially when you consider the price points offered by Intel. Hopefully, conditions will change and there will be more options besides the atom.

    As for my screen name, nope. I've used it on another forum (of a similar theme) and no one had a problem with it there. I don't see why it would be a problem here.
     
  5. 360

    360 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What is a "casual everyday user?" How is that defined exactly? How have you determined that their preferred OS is non-embedded Doze? How have you determined that this group is the target for these devices?

    The fact that no one has objected(or so you claim)doesn't make it okay. Wouldn't you agree? I mean surely you can think of another s/n.
     
  6. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You're really not suggesting that this information isn't already out there? If you consider the specs netbooks typically ship with, it's not possible to reason out their target demographic? UMPCs traditionally do well for what kind of buyers? How does this relate to netbooks? It's not really that cryptic. I'm not referring to skewered "indepedent" research firms either. Outside netbooks themselves, there are plenty of resources on the preferred computing OSes for everyday consumers.

    And as for my forum name, does it really matter either way? I didn't know it required anyones approval besides those who operate the website.
     
  7. 360

    360 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Maybe you misunderstood my questions, so let me ask again.
    What is your definition of an "everyday casual user" and/or "everyday consumer?"
    How do you define that?
    How have you determined what this group's preferences are?
    How have you determined that this group is the target for these devices?


    And if "Gorilla" is the only handle you can think of for yourself, then hey...
     
  8. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Do any of those things really need to be redefined by me? Not really.

    Casual users are people who only expect their computer to do the most basic of tasks. They only want to browse the web, do some wordprocessing, watch videos, maybe listen to a bit of music, and do email. They don't care about the underpinnings of their machine and will often use what's familiar. Linux would be fine for all of this but they'd much rather stick with what they know for different reasons along with familiarity.

    Again, there's plenty of data about the consumption patterns of consumer electronics and computing. That's how it's determined.

    Simple. The devices in question are suited to these tasks and are ultra portable. People who want these features will try them. Enthusiasts will buy them for similar reasons, but also because they're -- well enthusiasts. Would it make sense for people who want to game or run intensive applications to purchase these machines? No.


    Appropriately filed under no one cares.
     
  9. 360

    360 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    How do you explain the huge number of professionals and others outside of the group you described who have found these devices to be particularly useful?

    How do you explain the huge number of users of smartphones who pretty much fall into the category you're describing, who certainly are not using Doze and in many cases aren't using embedded Doze when they easily manipulate their device in a number of ways?


    You mentioned that the OS that these devices are shipped with is a means of determining certain things.

    You mentioned in another thread that you're experimenting with Arch Linux. If you don't mind my asking,
    what OS was this machine shipped with?

    Again, if that's what you want to call yourself...
     
  10. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    They really don't need explaining. If the end-user finds the device within parameters they can use as a means to accomplish other goals. The device will be purchased. All netbooks sold aren't for professional use.

    This is an apples to oranges comparison. As I've previously said though, Droid's success will help Linux become a more mainstream solution. How about all the people who don't purchase phones running an embedded nix of any form (including the iphone) because it doesn't play well with corporate environments?

    This is really a bad over simplification that kind of makes your next point moot. I said that if Linux continues to perform well and grows in the netbook arena, vendors will have an easier time introducing ARM chipsets. I also described why. This is not the same as saying users will be locked into working with whatever they are given. If Windows 7 Starter cant run on ARM chips, how would they get a machine that's ARM based and ships with Win7? How would these machines compete with cheaper options offered by Intel (unless the 2010 ARM units rolling out are in high demand and they can lower the price)?

    The laptop I slapped it on shipped with XP roughly 5 years ago. My desktop shipped with no OS. This really makes no difference for the case presented by the rant. Linux still needs mainstream adoption to justify more processor offerings in netbooks.
     
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