Pan Africanism : At least 1 trip to Africa

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by KWABENA, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    Hey Brothers-n-Sisters:

    I believe that every brother and sister should take a least 1 trip to Africa to see what it is like, where they came from, get to know the way of life, meet the people, and so on.

    I know that some of you have already been to Africa before. But do you believe that it is necessary to at least take 1 trip to Africa sometime in your lifetime?

    I know I will as soon as I can find the money and time.

    Cedric Denson
     
  2. deepy

    deepy going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    i agree with you...at least one...and if lucky many.\
    one can take a steamer to africa...did you know that..it's much cheaper..may take longer, but really a very interesting way to travel..only 5 to l0 passengers on a steamer..always eating at the captains table...interesting stops along the way...fascinating..
    actually ..since the war I don't even know if they have them anymore...so i might have spoken to soon...but really it would cost half the airline way..
     
  3. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That's good advice sister Deepy, thanks for the info!
     
  4. Prophet Chris

    Prophet Chris Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Blessed, we do need to purchise ships to go home to Africa, Black Starliner ships, I would like to know if you know more about these steamers you are talking about, do you know anyting else abou them. Blessed
     
  5. Prophet Chris

    Prophet Chris Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have already implamented a trip to Ethiopia, in April, and ghana in sept, then to choose where i want to perminently reside, then Repatriate. to continue the fight for international repatriation. But thank you for your advise, and for black people it is part of the gospel that you just spread, God Bless you. BLessed LOve
     
  6. deepy

    deepy going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    prohet chris...
    forgive the delay in responding..sometime life lessons takes one away from everything else...anyway
    back in the 70's several companies North Steam Ship Association being one listed the various steam ships and where they travelled. I would assume now you can go online and punch in steamship travel and see what you come up with...and if , in fact, they still travel to Africa...I am sure they still travel because they are basically cargo ships. If you give me a week or so i will be able to take the time to do a little research...
    It was great and people who have, to this day, become friends...
     
  7. plainrhythm

    plainrhythm Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sounds cool, holla when you come. i'm already staying in Africa. i'm here for the next three years then i leave back to michigan. it's a beautiful place, just don't expect any wild animals. you'll find them at the zoo like every place else.
    good luck on your trips!
    ps: be sure that cape town is the first place you go to.
     
  8. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    Thank you very much fam. You know, I got a little bit upset when I posted this thread because for at least the first 10 days, nobody didn't even look at it! I find it very important to go to the mother land. You learn about it throughout your lifetime, understanding that you come from it, and you do not want to visit the land? Give me a break.

    How can you tell all these stories and tales about Africa, and never visit the place? I know I will visit as soon as I get a chance. And in my visit(s) over there, I will gather as much knowledge as I can. It makes too much sense - why not spend time with our people over there. Believe it not African-Americans, they are our people too! Some of them are related to us, we were just separated for so many years, we would not know it. I will be shocked to death if I went over there and encountered someone who was intelligent, got into a conversation with me, and began to realize that we were family! That would be a miracle, but ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE!

    Cedric Denson
     
  9. pdiane

    pdiane Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Cedric, I posted this on another site but I am going to share with you my experience in Africa:

    .


    Wow (that means "yes" in Wolof).

    Senegal is beautiful. It is a 90% Muslim country, very peaceful, no liquor stores, not a lot of crime, everday people. The beaches are prestine. I stayed on the beach one night with drummers and dances. I slept in a hut, and heard the ocean water back and forth. It was absolutely phenominal.

    I went with my Senegalese dance teacher, Fatou, and her son. Her family was beautiful and loving. Not once did I hear of any ethnic issues because in Senegal, Islam and their traditional spiritual systems keep them, prayful, strong, and united.

    There were some problems in a Casamance (Fatou's childhood village) , where I went and stayed for 3 days, by the way, but there has been peace there for a couple of years now. There was a welcoming party for Fatou and us there. We danced to the river with the whole village. Wow, wow.

    Senegal is poor but spiritual. Family is extremely important. I stayed in Dakar the city and the village, both were wonderful. There are no elderly homes everyone takes care of each other. The babies are on the backs of all the family members. They are not allowed to cry without someone putting them on their backs. Senegal does not have a welfare system, so everyone takes care of each other. They eat from the same tray and the staple food is fish, chicken, rice, vegetables, mangos, pineapples and other fruits that are all around you. Entrepreneuship is the way of life. Selling something , bartering, and trading keeps income coming in.

    All we did was hug and kiss one another. Afraka needs us and we need Afraka. I cannot speak for every country in Afraka, there are 55 but I could see myself in Senegal working in the schools, starting a telephone or cyber cafe business. Bringing our children there to learn the rich culture of our people would be a great as well. We had children from amerikkka with us and they did not want to come back. They were free, at peace, no violent incidents anywhere around us.

    I met a number of African Americans who are educating their children there, who have built homes there and live there. Their children know 3 to 4 languages. I just found out the Charlie Titus, the UMass Athletic Director, built a home there.

    I learned Wolof before I went to Senegal. I speak a little Wolof. They were were absolutely delighted. It was wonderful. "Dig" means hear and understand, "julee" means pray. "Dadit" means "no". We use the "d" sound for "th" words when we speak ebonics, I see why now.

    We went to Goree Island, we cried, we hugged each other and it was so emotional. I could see the pain in our faces and the pain in their faces as well.

    Afraka belongs to me. I don't care if some Afrakans don't want us there or do not think of us as Afrakans. There were times when the children in Casamance called me "toobob" meaning "white". but that is their ignorance, most of the people welcomed us home.

    Do Afrakans want to come to amerikkka? Yes, some do but those that are here are dying to go home as well and I see why. As soon as they can afford to go they will go in a second.

    The last night there, in Dakar, the whole community came out for a celebration called Tandameer, it was like the a street party that we used to have years ago. We sat in special chairs and the whole community drummed and danced for us. The women dressed in their finest, (which they do everyday anyway). They looked like queens. The men wore the African attire as well and we all danced together. Money was flying all over the place.

    Amerikkka can't touch Afraka, this place is a diabolical mess. For those of us who choose to stay here. It is good. We need our people on all fronts. However, it is good to know that we have choices and I am out of here when I retire in 2-3 years.

    Mark your calendars for July 2005, we are going back with Fatou, Insha Allah, God willing.


    Peace.

    Senegal is a 7 hour flight from New York. If you get you tickets early it could be $1000 or less.
    __________________
     
  10. bobo

    bobo Active Member MEMBER

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    I've considered taking a trip to Africa. I'm glad there are people who are willing to go back to the mother land.
     
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