Black People : Assata Shakur - The Strength of Women

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Nov 28, 2013.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    "I can imagine the pain and the strength of my great great grandmothers who were slaves and my great great grandmothers who were Cherokee Indians trapped on reservations.
    I remembered my great grandmother who walked everywhere rather than sit in the back of the bus.
    I think about North Carolina and my home town and i remember the women of my grandmother’s generation: strong, fierce women who could stop you with a look out the corners of their eyes.
    Women who walked with majesty; who could wring a chicken’s neck and scale a fish.
    Who could pick cotton, plant a garden and sew without a pattern.
    Women who boiled clothes white in big black cauldrons and who hummed work songs and lullabys.
    Women who visited the elderly, made soup for the sick and shortnin bread for the babies.
    Women who delivered babies, searched for healing roots and brewed medicines.
    Women who darned sox and chopped wood and layed bricks.
    Women who could swim rivers and shoot the head off a snake.
    Women who took passionate responsibility for their children and for their neighbors’ children too.
    The women in my grandmother’s generation made giving an art form. “Here, gal, take this pot of collards to Sister Sue”; “Take this bag of pecans to school for the teacher”; “Stay here while I go tend Mister Johnson’s leg.”
    Every child in the neighborhood ate in their kitchens.
    They called each other sister because of feeling rather than as the result of a movement.
    They supported each other through the lean times, sharing the little they had. The women of my grandmother’s generation in my home town trained their daughters for womanhood.
    They taught them to give respect and to demand respect.
    They taught their daughters how to churn butter; how to use elbow grease."

    -- Assata Shakur --
     
  2. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Being that she is
    Yes, an interesting piece, but time will tell , who is inspired enough to comment on it, here...

    FYI
    no longer in our midst, in the states, even Assata approaches as an advisor may well need to be updated, etc.

    FYI
     
  3. Josef

    Josef Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you for posting this Brother oldsoul.
     
  4. butterfly#1

    butterfly#1 going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This speaks to the very core of my existence. Thanks oldsoul for bringing this back to the forefront. This NEEDS to be re-established in some of our men's minds. I think.......

    Women being strong should not be a threat to our men for we are here to be an assistant/leader where need be, to further our cause as a race, BAMN!!!

    Every word spoken here is TRUE!
     
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