Beauty - Hair Care - Fashion : Are you offended if someone calls your hair NAPPY?

Black-king

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Sep 13, 2011
1,928
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Oh, wonderful, if it means you you're falling back from what you have no clue about, all's well.
I am not the one who is offended about my hair and lips, you are. If you don't get rid of that mindset, you are going to be a problem for your future spouse. I can see it in the picture of your avatar, stringy hair looking like the slave mistress. Love yourself young one and keep your hair natural.
 

Angela22

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Feb 26, 2013
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I am not the one who is offended about my hair and lips, you are. If you don't get rid of that mindset, you are going to be a problem for your future spouse. I can see it in the picture of your avatar, stringy hair looking like the slave mistress. Love yourself young one and keep your hair natural.

Hmm, weren't you just stating you can't help me there? Why you still talkin'? :lol: I guess that's too much to hope for. :look:

Still haven't a clue, nevertheless. And please quit concerning yourself with my business, as in, my "future spouse". He's nothing to do with you. Understood?

Anyhow, have fun talking to yourself. :wave:
 

IntuitioninMD_2

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MEMBER
Oct 16, 2012
227
25
First of all, this is not an original idea. I came up with this topic after reading the thread asking women who wear their hair natural to identify themselves and share their reasons for choosing to be "natural."

While reading the responses, I really became more curious to know are there any Black(men and women) that get offended if someone referred to their hair as being "nappy"?

When/if someone says that, does it hurt your feelings and make you defensive?

Is anyone willing to admit that they are bothered by the natural curls that spring tight to their head and you just don't like them?

lBlack women:

Has a man ever told you he liked your hair better permed and weaved?

Has he ever named a "movie star" to give you an example of the type of hairstyle he would like you to wear?

When I was much younger, I used to get offended if someone told me my hair was nappy because that was meant to be an insult. Today, I've been long past that form of ignorant way of thinking and have developed a more caring relationship with my hair. I'm no longer insulted if someone refers to my hair as nappy. In fact, I am starting to think that it's one of the highest compliments a Black person can be paid.

As I look at how Black women express themselves through their hairstyles, I often wonder what reasons lie underneath their chosen style. When they look in the mirror, what do they see? I see a Black woman's hair as an expression of who they are and it says a lot about how she thinks of herself and views the world in which she lives.

I think a Black woman's hair is uniquely and wonderfully versatile. It can signify social, political, economic and spiritural connotations. It can be shaped, styled and manipulated in as many different ways as the mind can conjure up ideas. Our hair can reflect so much about us. They say that the eyes are windows into our souls. Maybe our nappy hair is a reflection of our souls.

Here's a website that I found interesting and wanted to share with all my nappy haired sisters! I hope you enjoy it.

:toast:

http://www.geocities.com/jywanza1/Blackwomenshaira.htm

I personally think the word nappy is offensive because of its origins.

Sometimes we as a people act as if we cannot derive our own terms to describe ourselves. I have not heard of any other culture taking negative words that other cultures created to describe them in a derogatory way and then saying I am embracing it. Seems more like brainwashing to me.

Natural hair is what it is.
 

IFE

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Jan 20, 2015
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Happy To Be Nappy is the name of a natural hair salon located in Atlanta GA.
Nappy, kinky, curly are positive words for my hair. I will not give the white man power over my hair. My hair is locked and nappy. Sometimes it's curly, and sometimes it's kinky. My Locs wake up each morning with a life of their own.
Locs used to be called Dread locks. Enlightened ones dropped the dread, because there's nothing DREADFUL about them.

To refer to a person as a nappy headed girl in a negative reference and, I think is unacceptable. Nappy is a hair type, not a person.
 

IFE

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MEMBER
Jan 20, 2015
3,041
498
I not going to get deep about my decision to loc. it was really an issue of finance. I was spending thousands of $$$$$. A year on my hair and it was causing problems in my marriage. I told my husband I would stop and I wanted to start locing my hair. He went thru all the phases of locing with me. Supporting me so I didn't give up during the infant/ugly phase. He call them our Locs now.

Now, in my mature season of life I love my Locs. I don't have to make the decision what to do with my hair! I'm loving it. Loving it.

If I would tell a younger Black woman to try locing that would be the reason why.

Locing is a journey and that's how it ends.
 

Egmond Codfried

Banned
MEMBER
Oct 2, 2012
138
32
First of all, I love Americans for how they talk, their issues, their solutions. I live now for a year in Morocco and look on in amazement at these terribly lovely and handsome light skinned NEGROES. They aint no whites in this here African country. pinks would not last a second in this here desert sun. Them is light brown, brown, very brown and black. 50 percent is prognastic, all have full lips and dark eyes. A few girls look like Pamela Anderson, but they is 100 percent African. No pink ancestors.

And we have the very black skinned straight haired Blacks over here. People always look at them. Velvetly Black skin, long strait hair, pointy nose and thin lips. They remind me of Black Indians, hindustani we have in Suriname, and do I love them. So many women cover their head and if its not for religion, its tradition, and you must cover your head against the sun. I see them adding another layer or a bathtowel on top of the fetching silk foulard they already wear. You cannot find out their hair structure. I tried a Black matrobe but she would not move the headscarf for me, but she was smiling anyway. Black, black husband hovering nearby...

Now I understand why men will take mothers tableclothe and tie it on their head, to get away from the intense ovenlike heat. Some women in Suriname straight their hair and it makes them look rich and pampered as we know how much this cost. I am not familiar with folks in SURINAME giving others grieve for having KROES haar. We laugh at anything nasty said about race indications, because we is Black, everybody is Black, we had better accept our big noses, huge behinds and yes, nappy hair.
 

KPITRL

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
May 7, 2013
699
303
First of all, I love Americans for how they talk, their issues, their solutions. I live now for a year in Morocco and look on in amazement at these terribly lovely and handsome light skinned NEGROES. They aint no whites in this here African country. pinks would not last a second in this here desert sun. Them is light brown, brown, very brown and black. 50 percent is prognastic, all have full lips and dark eyes. A few girls look like Pamela Anderson, but they is 100 percent African. No pink ancestors.

And we have the very black skinned straight haired Blacks over here. People always look at them. Velvetly Black skin, long strait hair, pointy nose and thin lips. They remind me of Black Indians, hindustani we have in Suriname, and do I love them. So many women cover their head and if its not for religion, its tradition, and you must cover your head against the sun. I see them adding another layer or a bathtowel on top of the fetching silk foulard they already wear. You cannot find out their hair structure. I tried a Black matrobe but she would not move the headscarf for me, but she was smiling anyway. Black, black husband hovering nearby...

Now I understand why men will take mothers tableclothe and tie it on their head, to get away from the intense ovenlike heat. Some women in Suriname straight their hair and it makes them look rich and pampered as we know how much this cost. I am not familiar with folks in SURINAME giving others grieve for having KROES haar. We laugh at anything nasty said about race indications, because we is Black, everybody is Black, we had better accept our big noses, huge behinds and yes, nappy hair.
I know I'm not focusing on hair type alone here, but you described the Black race in a way many African-Americans seem to have forgotten how too. You didn't separate us on our different hair types and skin-tones, but you only recognized and acknowledged these differences, while showing respect for the entire race. We've fallen from that lately, and at the worst time.
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
I not going to get deep about my decision to loc. it was really an issue of finance. I was spending thousands of $$$$$. A year on my hair and it was causing problems in my marriage. I told my husband I would stop and I wanted to start locing my hair. He went thru all the phases of locing with me. Supporting me so I didn't give up during the infant/ugly phase. He call them our Locs now.

Now, in my mature season of life I love my Locs. I don't have to make the decision what to do with my hair! I'm loving it. Loving it.

If I would tell a younger Black woman to try locing that would be the reason why.

Locing is a journey and that's how it ends.
Keeping it nappy or sporting so called natural do

I admit not being impressed by today's style obsessed takes on black identity etc

as was and is true

I also do contrast how some just front with what they truly represent
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
I know I'm not focusing on hair type alone here, but you described the Black race in a way many African-Americans seem to have forgotten how too. You didn't separate us on our different hair types and skin-tones, but you only recognized and acknowledged these differences, while showing respect for the entire race. We've fallen from that lately, and at the worst time.
What else is on your mind these days my good brother

That matters as well in 2015

fyi
 

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