Black People : Are we finished with the light skinned dark skinned thang yet?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by MississippiRed, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. MississippiRed

    MississippiRed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What say folk...I'm just wondering man ..what brought this to my attention again ..I was in the mall the other day..The Great Mall of The Bay Area in case yall want to know...anyway...I see a couple of brothers walking through heading my way..so when they get to me I speak..."what's happenin" man they looked at me like I was speaking in alien....whatever..later I see a couple of sisters walking through..thought I'd speak again...How yall doin? Nothing just looked kept on stepping...since I've been out here I've been called white *****, white boy trying to be black, mexican, puerto rican, trying to be black...black women out here don't even give me the time of day....the last Black woman I tried to talk to flat told me ..baby you cool but you're just too light for me...what the fish was that.....I've had to fight my own folk since I was a kid because of the skin I'm in...light colored eyes, light skin wrong words at wrong time = boot up time...I want to know are we done with that man...we always want to say us minorities' gotta stick together...we let white folk in Def Poetry Jam..lol... we say all these other folk are cool and feel for them and always talk about being treated with respect by other races but we don't treat our own folk with respect...it's like we're fighting a war but within our war effort we're fighting another war amongst ourselves...lightskinned, half breed, whatever...I met a cat today that was Black/Japanese cool to death but said Black folk treat him like a bucket of dry dog stuff...I feel him though man..being not only high yellow but a half breed too makes me feel for all the half breed folk man...where one half don't want you and the other half don't want you but they feel free to test you...it's a funny funny situation...anyway I just wanted to know if we as a people are done with this foolishness or are we still trippin...

    Mississippi Red
    BET sucks cause they don't show Alcorn State football games... Go Braves!!!!!
     
  2. CarrieMonet

    CarrieMonet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I wish I could say this is not an issue still, but sadly it is and it doesn't seem like it will go away.

    Some of the problem seems to be the media, some of it is how we raise our children, or how we were raised, and the rest is just ignorance.

    I keep thinking that if black people can't resolve issues within our own race, we surely can't expect to change the viewpoints of white people.

    Black people to me are beautiful, all shades of brown.
     
  3. kente417mojo

    kente417mojo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That sucks man. I never really hear about anyone downing light brothas and especially not light sistas. I don't know what it is. We're all in the same boat and should stick together...whether we're light or dark.
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    yes, we are
     
  5. MississippiRed

    MississippiRed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    One reason I think you don't hear that much from light skinned women I think..could be wrong is that darker men look at them like white men look at Black women you know....where by they can't stand Black men but will lay with a Black woman...

    Mississippi Red

    I dont' care what anybody says I like malt liquor, chicken and watermelon...
     
  6. MississippiRed

    MississippiRed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    James I ask that question more as a rhetorical question than anything else because I think some of us are while a lot of us are not....I know Kanye West isn't done with this...in one of his songs stating something to the fact that I'm making sure light skinned ngas never come back in style.......that's garbage man...
     
  7. triniti424

    triniti424 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Brotha mississippi :read: As I am sure you know my brotha...you can get a lil of errythang errywhere :look: ...the bay area is no exception...(I would know...Born in Daly City, Raised in East Oakland, Residing in Berkeley...so I gather much of what you are sharing) But of course brotha the reality is this has never BEEN a geographical issue... it has always been something of "mentality" and of course brah you and I both know...thats international.

    I myself am Blak & Samoan and ironically enough growing up in East Oakland was ALLLLLL about "thin & dark skin" bein "in". I went down south...and it was a lil bit of vice versa...went out east...it was a lil bit of both...but remnants of the whole "skin tone" issue can be found where ever you may go. The real issue is whether or not WE as blak individuals care to acknowledge it validate it or whatever the case may be...in what we choose to say or do etcetera. I pay no mind to those who DO choose to overlook me or shun me because I may be too "light" skinned for THEM not too light to be blak just too light for certain folks lol which is fine...everyone is entitled to their own opinions. I was raised to believe fervrently in the nubian blood that created me and I wear it with pride. So you see brotha...you may not change them...but may it never be said that their misconceptions changed you. As sista carrie mentioned earlier..."BLAK is beautiful..." period aint no need to go no further...it is what it is ya know :look: :)
     
  8. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  9. toylin

    toylin Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    May I direct you all to my poems "Just a Pissed off Poem" parts 1 and 2? This is STILL a big issue. I went back to the other thread where someone said just let it go, it encourages peope to dig up their slave issues.

    Why is it, that most of the time we describe ourselevs to each other, the first thing we say is "Well, I'm _____ skinned, about yay tall, x amount of pounds...." ???

    I've been called light, bright, [email protected] near white, mixed, PR, Latina, Indian, whatever. I actually had someone white tell me that I was too light to be so militant. This person told me to go back and look for the caucasoids in my family tree because obviously they were close by. I told her to go look for the negros swinging from her family tree, cuz I'm sure her daddy owns a pointy hat.... But, not to get off the subject. (I'll tell y'all all about it sometime.)

    The point is, we do still make judgements based strictly on color, mimicking the folks who created the whole color line mess. It is NOT over, and will not be over until we can all spell U-N-I-T-Y.
     
  10. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I've read the comments here and most of the comments in the thread Brother Panafica was kind enough to direct us to. To address Mississippi Red's question, in my opinion, skintone is still very much an issue among Black people whether we are conscious of it or not. If racism is an issue for us still, then so are the by-products of racism--of which, color was made an issue among Africans/African Americans. I could be wrong, but I also believe color of one's skin is also important to people of other races as well, i.e., whites and Indians (from India). Am I correct Brother Pan?

    Light skinned Indians versus dark skinned Indians. Light skinned Latinos versus dark skinned Latinos. Light skinned whites versus dark skinned whites. Skin color as an issue is not confined to Blacks only. I also think that classism has been attached to the color of one's skin which adds to the problems many people deal with. The "higher" class people = lighter skin. This used (is it still?) very true with our HBCU's--Fisk readily comes to mind. Even with our fraternities and sororities--AKA's and Kappas readily come to mind. The "lower" class people = darker skin. Color of one's skin is not a fad as some people tend to think of it--it's historical in nature and construct like most issues when it comes to our society and the people in it.

    For African Americans there's a double whammy when you add racism into the equation. I believe there's an automatic dislike that's been bred into us as a result of how we were treated (are still treated?) due to the color of our skin. We see this coming out of Hollywood all the time, don't we? Do you know that the Civil Rights Laws of 1964 (as amended) include protection for people based on the color of their skin? Yes, there are lawsuits on state and federal books that have been filed by dark skinned Blacks against light skinned Blacks and vice versa. It's not a figment of one's imagination nor is it no longer an issue. I believe what happens more often than not, is that Blacks have chosen to deal with their struggle against racism which we dictate is a much tougher and more important battle than the issue of color. But color is a very much a political issue when it comes to our communities.

    As Brother Mississippi Red has pointed out--color is still very much an issue and we need to recognize it. The brother has just shared HIS experiences which are real to him. We can't simply dismiss it or invalidate his feelings because WE think differently or have different experiences. It doesn't make the problem go away because we don't see it like he does. To be genuinely CONSCIOUS requires more than just an understanding of the racial divide, but also how racism has plagued us with it's insidious poison such that we don't always recognize how and to what degree it affects us. I think color goes beyond personal preferences for most people just like "race" does.

    MHO,
    Queenie :spinstar:
     
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