Black People Politics : Are we color struck?

Discussion in 'Black People Politics' started by _NortheastGroover_, May 25, 2014.

  1. _NortheastGroover_

    _NortheastGroover_ Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I was watching a video by Dr. Umar Johnson and he said something kinda struck me. He said, he believed, that 1 one of the reason Khalid Muhammad wasn't successful (in comparison to others) as a leader is because he was a heavily melenated brotha (dark skin). I thought about it and the only other heavily melenated leader we had was Marcus Mosiah Garvey.

    Elijah Muhammad
    Malcolm X
    Huey Newton
    Louis Farrakhan
    Jesse Jackson
    WEB Dubois
    Barack Obama
    Al Sharpton

    So are we color struck as to who follow? Do our leaders have to pass a 'brown paperbag' test for us to be attracted to what they represent?


    **I tried to post the video with Dr. Umar Johnson but it said I can't post links so....
     
  2. Kadijah

    Kadijah Banned MEMBER

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    Interesting proposition of light and brown-skinned brothers being supported by the masses, but having dark skin, IMO, had little to nothing to do with black people not lifting Khalid Muhammad up as a national leader.
     
  3. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Michael Eric Dyson eluded to the systemic "color-code" and subtly theorized that if he and his brother were to have switched complexions, he would probably have had a similar experience of his brother and his brother of his.




    What occurs is that what we translate as this so called color-code is only manifested into an obvious nature when dealing with the same system that created it.

    In the privacy of familiar beings and within our own courtings, this color-code barely exists, until someone gets offended.


    Respect
     
  4. Kadijah

    Kadijah Banned MEMBER

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    The video reminds me of Lupita's speech about how being dark-skinned affected her psyche, growing up. The men watching the video within the video of Dyson and his brother, reacted in the exact same way that the women in the audience at Lupita's speech reacted - with tears, heartbreak, gotta get away from the pain.....

    The Lupita and Dyson videos, IMO, holds the key to why most of our leaders are light and brown, rather than dark-skinned. Like 'dark as night' Lupita who only wanted to be "pretty" like the light-skinned girls, precisely because of his dark skin, Dyson's brother received the same soul-crushing treatment AS A CHILD. As do females, Lupita internalized the tidal waves of assault on her dark-skin that made her feel unworthy; as do males, Dyson's brother struck out at the society that made him feel unworthy with criminal acts that landed him in prison, i.e., "black is evil and no good? I'll throw my pain back at you and show you what no good feels like!"

    Fighting against the "evil" connotations put on dark skin (since to be light is to be "fair," dark skin by extrapolation, must be "unfair") by acting out in destructive and self-destructive ways, most don't develop the polish, the confidence, the serenity of fitting in one's own (dark) skin that the "masses" look for in a (national) leader. After being slighted, dismissed, and/or ignored by adults who influence their peers' images and perceptions, and could make a difference in their young lives as "will never amount to much", e.g., teachers, cynicism towards the mass of black people cannot help but set in. Under the tidal waves of assault on their psyches by BLACK people who have internalized the slave's mentality of white/all right, brown/stick around, black/ step back, why would the best, the most intelligent and able of our dark-skinned brethren volunteer to take the brickbats of being a national leader for those who have always put a negative value on their heavily melanated skins? Why would they sacrifice, suffer for people who have from their earliest memories, torn them down rather than recognized their genius and lifted them up? Why would the black masses flock to would-be leaders who are guarded, defensive, and not "well rounded"?

    It is not by accident that most black leaders are not dark-skinned. Marcus Garvey was an immigrant who did not grow up in our African-American hot-house of color consciousness. As such, he is the exception (to skin color of black leaders) that proves the rule.
     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Stokely Carmichael was a Trinidadian-American political activist best known for leading the civil rights group SNCC in the 1960s.
    http://www.biography.com/people/stokely-carmichael-9238629#awesm=~oFSeOA6QlCB4oH

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    Khalid Abdul Muhammad (born Harold Moore Jr.; January 12, 1948 – February 17, 2001) was an African American activist who came to prominence as the National Assistant to Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam (NOI). After a 1993 speech at Kean College Muhammad was condemned and removed from his position in the Nation of Islam by Louis Farrakhan.
    http://www.melanindvds.com/drkhalidmuhammad.html


     
  6. Deacs

    Deacs Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I can't speak for others. I am not. It doesn't matter the complexion or sex.

    Only the religious entrenchment of the message.
     
  7. Kadijah

    Kadijah Banned MEMBER

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    Again, proof of the pudding, i.e., exception to the rule - Stokely's formative years were NOT in America. He didn't come to this country until he was 11 years old and his sense of self was in tact.
     
  8. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    There are many more than Stokely ...



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  9. Kadijah

    Kadijah Banned MEMBER

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    You could add almost any black man who has ever headed any organization, e.g., their local P.T.A., block club, etc., or like your Black Panther nominees, been an "officer" in a black organization to your photo gallery (btw, you have 3 pix of Fred Hampton who was brown-skinned, not dark). The OP spoke of men who were/are the FACE of national organizations, are NATIONAL icons (a couple of folk in your gallery, I've never even heard of). With the notable exception of dark-skinned Dr. King :bowdown: the others, like Ralph Abernathy, were lieutenants/seconds-in-command.

    Stop getting it twisted. :news:
     
  10. Kadijah

    Kadijah Banned MEMBER

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    Although... :SuN034:Stokley, Dr. King and Marcus Garvey are 20th century leaders. The Father of Black Nationalism (and so admired by Abraham Lincoln that when he volunteered to fight the Confederacy, was appointed the first black commissioned officer in U.S. history), Martin Delany, was dark-skinned. As was Edward Blyden.... and Abraham, leader of the Black Seminoles (before John Horse) who won their freedom by kicking the Army's butt on the battlefield 20 years prior to the Emancipation Proclamation which freed the rest of our ancestors.

    The latter 3 off the top of my head so, you might be on to something, Clyde. :research:
     
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