Black People : Are there Protests in Africa, we Are Not hearing About??

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Feb 14, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The press just mentioned Persia, aight

    but

    Are there protests in Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Congo, Guinea and Chad

    that the white supremist press is not presenting and also since many of our people there have no freedom of the press and in places where there is,

    usualy all media is suspended during times of civil unrest

    How do we know whether or not our sisters and brothers are protesting European servants, running nations,
    in the Motherland?:SuN038:
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    political unrest in a West African country called Gabon. With little geo-political importance, news organisations seem largely oblivious to the drama that began unfolding on January 29, when the opposition protested against Ali Bhongo Odhimba’s government, whom they accuse of hijacking recent elections. The demonstrators demanded free elections and the security forces duly stepped in to lay those ambitions to rest. The clashes between protesters and police that followed show few signs of relenting.

    "The events in Tunisia and Egypt have become, within Africa, a rallying cry for any number of opposition leaders, everyday people harbouring grievances and political opportunists looking to liken their country's regimes to those of Ben Ali or Hosni Mubarak," says Drew Hinshaw, an American journalist based in West Africa. "In some cases that comparison is outrageous, but in all too many it is more than fair.

    "Look at Gabon, a tragically under-developed oil exporter whose GDP per capita is more than twice that of Egypt's but whose people are living on wages that make Egypt look like the land of full employment.

    "The Bhongo family has run that country for four decades, since before Mubarak ran nothing larger than an air force base, and yet they're still there. You can understand why the country's opposition is calling for new rounds of Egypt-like protests after seeing what Egypt and Tunisia were able to achieve."

    Elsewhere on the continent protests have broken out in Khartoum, Sudan where students held Egypt-inspired demonstrations against proposed cuts to subsidies on petroleum products and sugar. Following the protests there on January 30, CPJ reported that staff from the weekly Al-Midan were arrested for covering the event.

    Ethiopian media have also reported that police there detained the well-known journalist Eskinder Nega for "attempts to incite" Egypt-style protests. In Cameroon, the Social Democratic Front Party has said that the country might experience an uprising similar to those in North Africa if the government does not slash food prices.

    "There are lots of Africans too who are young, unemployed, who see very few prospects for their future in countries ruled by the same old political elite that have ruled for 25 or 30 or 35 years," says CSM Africa bureau chief Scott Baldauf.


    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/02/22-9
     
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