Black Spirituality Religion : Archaeology and the Old Testament

42. Nebuchadnezzar II, king, r. 604–562, 2 Kings 24:1, etc., in many cuneiform tablets, including his own inscriptions. See Raging Torrent, pp. 220–223; COS, vol. 2, pp. 308–310; ANET, pp. 221, 307–311; ABC, p. 232. The Neo-Babylonian Chronicle series refers to him in Chronicles 4 and 5 (ANEHST, pp. 415, 416–417, respectively). Chronicle 5, reverse, lines 11–13, briefly refers to his conquest of Jerusalem (“the city of Judah”) in 597 by defeating “its king” (Jehoiachin), as well as his appointment of “a king of his own choosing” (Zedekiah) as king of Judah.

*Nebuchadnezzar II is very interesting for me and I am studying about him, the Prophet Daniel and the Persian kings right now.
 
...
"An Austrian archaeological team, led by Dr. Manfred Bietak, has excavated the palatial district at Avaris (Tell el-Dab'a) and produced some significant results for illuminating the Nile Delta's history during the 15th and 18th Dynasties. While Bietak's subsequent publications primarily have focused on the exquisite Minoan wall paintings and the site's likely association with Peru-nefer, Egypt's naval base during the height of her imperialistic thrust into Asia, much less attention has centered on the timing of the mid-18th-Dynasty abandonment of Avaris (= biblical Rameses) that Bietak says occurred 'after Amenhotep II', and was followed by an inexplicable occupational gap. Did the abandonment occur during the reign of Amenhotep II, at the end of his reign, or during the reign of Thutmose IV?

The present work will seek to bring together all of the relevant data-from the archaeological evidence at the site, the epigraphical record, and corroborative evidence from Theban tomb paintings-in an attempt to determine more precisely the timing of the mid-18th-Dynasty abandonment of the site (i.e. the mid-2nd millennium BC).

This article powerfully validates the conclusions drawn in the article I previously wrote on the identity of the exodus-pharaoh, which also is available on the ABR website."

 

Burial Inscription of King Uzziah​

Is 6:1 – In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up; and the Isa train of his robe filled the temple.

The burial inscription of King Uzziah. Photo: Bryan Windle
When King Uzziah died, he was buried in a field and not in the royal tombs because he was a leper (2 Chr 26:23). Later, when Jerusalem expanded in the Herodian era, Uzziah’s tomb likely had to be moved. In 1931, E.L. Sukenik, a professor of archaeology at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, came across a marble slab with an Aramaic inscription while examining items in the Russian Orthodox monastery. It reads, “Here were brought the bones of Uzziah, king of Judah. Do not open.”11 To be clear, the inscription does not date to the 8th century BC, when Uzziah reigned, but rather to sometime between the Hasmonean and early Roman periods (ca 150 BC- 50AD), when his bones were moved, likely due to the expanding city, and reinterred.12 Uzziah’s secondary burial plaque is currently on display at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem and is a vivid reminder of the death of Uzziah and the year that Isaiah received his vision.

 
...
"An Austrian archaeological team, led by Dr. Manfred Bietak, has excavated the palatial district at Avaris (Tell el-Dab'a) and produced some significant results for illuminating the Nile Delta's history during the 15th and 18th Dynasties. While Bietak's subsequent publications primarily have focused on the exquisite Minoan wall paintings and the site's likely association with Peru-nefer, Egypt's naval base during the height of her imperialistic thrust into Asia, much less attention has centered on the timing of the mid-18th-Dynasty abandonment of Avaris (= biblical Rameses) that Bietak says occurred 'after Amenhotep II', and was followed by an inexplicable occupational gap. Did the abandonment occur during the reign of Amenhotep II, at the end of his reign, or during the reign of Thutmose IV?

The present work will seek to bring together all of the relevant data-from the archaeological evidence at the site, the epigraphical record, and corroborative evidence from Theban tomb paintings-in an attempt to determine more precisely the timing of the mid-18th-Dynasty abandonment of the site (i.e. the mid-2nd millennium BC).

This article powerfully validates the conclusions drawn in the article I previously wrote on the identity of the exodus-pharaoh, which also is available on the ABR website."


Yes, I am very fascinated by this research.
I find it so amazing that the Ramesses built up this area and only recently, I came to understand that this Thebes was different from the earlier more ancient Thebes in the south!

I absolutely did not know this for years!

There is a lot of history in this region.
I also find it so interesting that archeologists found the Minoan presence in this region.
 

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