Black People : any questions, just ask

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by workingwhiteman, Jul 13, 2013.

  1. SouthsideIrish

    SouthsideIrish Banned MEMBER

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    I can offer alot in this area
     
  2. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    great offer ... thanks

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  3. SouthsideIrish

    SouthsideIrish Banned MEMBER

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    Thanks Destee

    I hope that I can help some people. The price of labor is quite high. People can do more than they think. And after they achieve they can help others. I remember the first time i put down a laminate wood floor in my house about 13 years ago now...friends saw and then I helped them..Truth be tolds theirs ended up being even nicer then mine but by working the trades for so long, I see how everything is done...I have asked alot of questions to drywall guys, tile setters, carpenters and so forth. My HVAC background involves some electrical, plumbing including gas pipe, copper and I have expanded to know more then I need in those areas.
     
  4. candeesweet

    candeesweet Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I guess you think we don't have men around? Or maybe we can't read directions, or our walls ain't filled with extra certificates?
     
  5. SouthsideIrish

    SouthsideIrish Banned MEMBER

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    All men aren't good with tools. Most men in this world have not been a blue collar worker for nearly 20 years in a field in which electrical, plumbing(copper soldering, brazing, gas pipe work, pvc work) sheet metal work come together as with the HVAC business. As a union sheetmetal worker on large scale jobs I see, ask, and rub shoulders with all trades. Even most men in my field don't have the cross over knowledge to install boilers, watertanks, air conditioners and furnaces while still having the ability to design and install duct systems in new homes AND hang large scale duct in commercial applications.

    Usually guys are normally replacement guys or residential new construction, OR commercial duct hangers.
    Not usually does one person have the ability to all of the above.

    So

    What I am saying is...I have an advanced skillset. And I am just trying to be nice and help someone.

    Sorry if my offer of help offended you, but the last time I bought a piece of copper pipe...it didn't come with directions.
     
  6. houserunner

    houserunner Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    OK, I'll kick this off. I'm a DIYer to the fullest, but there are things I would like to get underway that I have no experience in. I'll start off with replacing a furnace and an air conditioner. The AC question comes in stages. Starting out, which brand of furnace is the most efficient that will recoup my expenditure of the unit through efficiency? Also, I have a furnace that is well over 30 years old, so I am looking to replace it sometime soon, what is the best practices in replacement of a furnace if you would do it yourself?

    Now on to the AC, my unit is probably close to the age of my furnace, so what to do there? It is a central unit btw. Should I consider a new central unit or one of those Mitsubishi deals that you install in separate rooms? If I do go with a new central unit, which is the best that would recoup my expenditure of the unit through efficiency? Is there a system with central air, if I decide to replace a central air unit with another central air unit, to control temperatures in each room besides opening and closing ducts, as in separate room thermostats that can be routed to a central control? Piggybacking off of that last question, what are the best thermostats to go with? What is the best practice to replace an AC unit?

    To end it, is there a way to make money from my scrapping these units that I replace?
     
  7. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother houserunner ... great questions ... i'm looking forward to learning too!

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  8. SouthsideIrish

    SouthsideIrish Banned MEMBER

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    Ok here we go

    Furnaces are rated by their efficiency. All brands have different efficiency ratings. The most common being the 80% efficient. These are exhausted with a round metal pipe which ties into your existing chimney. The higher efficient ones...say 92%-95% are exhausted with a pvc pipe. See..the tempature of the gas(exhaust) leaving the furnace in an 80% furnace is about 350 degrees. In a pvc vented furnace it is about 100 degrees. With temperatures this low the flue gases(exhaust) start to turn into condensate and would rot a metal chimney pipe quickly. So the way I explain it to a customer...An 80% efficient furnace means 20 cents on the dollar goes up the chimney and 80cents on the dollar goes into the house. Obviously it works the same way with the higher efficient ones as far as cents on the dollar.

    The higher efficient aren't for everyone.. Installed price is about 1000 bucks higher. So it takes some time to get that money back. Same thing with AC's. They are rated by SEER(scientific energy electrical rating)
    Fancy for...higher the number...cheaper to run. Minimum to sell now is 13 SEER...But they go up to 18 or so. We don't put in many super high efficient AC's here in Chicago..because you only use cooling a few months out of the year.

    Besides money...the climate you are in is another factor in determining how efficient a furnace or AC you need.
     
  9. SouthsideIrish

    SouthsideIrish Banned MEMBER

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    As far as your AC goes. The mini split type(Mitsubishi being the most well known brand) is a great option when you want cooling but don't have ducts installed. Seeing as you do...a regular central AC is the way to go.


    There are ways to run separate thermostats to control different areas...(first floor/second floor...or one side of the house versus the other)

    But

    Your ducts need to be set up that way initially. With zone dampers controlling those ducts going to designated areas and then those zone dampers get wired to a zone board...with multiple thermostats getting wired to the board as well...You would also need a barometric damper on your return duct because your furnace would be sized for your whole house..and if only one zone damper is open you would need to relieve pressure by dumping some of the supply air(hot or cold air...whatever is on at the time) back into the the return..

    So obviously..we are now getting a little complicated.

    Hot air rises...cold air falls..If you have a basement with duct and individual branches to your supply registers..most times they have a damper. I tell people to get both a blue and red marker. Try to get some settings for heat and for cooling. You want to push more air upstairs in the summer..Probably not so much in the winter.
     
  10. SouthsideIrish

    SouthsideIrish Banned MEMBER

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    As far as furnace replacement...probably easier then doing an AC..mainly because its not quite as technical and requires less special tools. Also purchasing AC's and Freon require a license, and special installation are extensive.. Torch, vacuum pump, AC gauges. If you think you can secure these things we can talk further about installation, but meanwhile.

    Lets look at what we have to a put in a furnace.

    You have a gas line.

    You have a 120v line.

    Thermostat wire.

    80% furnace requires a simple chimney hook up.

    90% furnaces require a little more talking if you want to go that route.

    Excluding the pvc exhaust....All these are going to be fairly close as far as rehooking up to a new furnace.

    The most difficult part will be making the sheetmetal. The new furnace will no doubt be shorter. And you would need to fabricate some new metal that will be changing sizes from your existing plenum(big sheet metal box on top of furnace) to your new furnace top opening.

    Getting any further I would need to know if you have an upflow of downflow furnace..which can be determined by where your furnace sits in relation to your ductwork...Is the furnace in the basement? Does it sit in a first floor closet with your supply ducts running through the crawlspace?


    I believe I have answered a few questions.. If these have spurred more or you want to get more specific with your given application...feel free to ask.
     
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