Health and Wellness : ANOTHER EBOLA OUTBREAK

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Uganda Races to Contain a Deadly Ebola Outbreak

NAIROBI, Kenya — An outbreak of Ebola in Uganda, caused by a strain for which there is no approved vaccine or drug treatment, is fanning fears across East Africa, as the authorities race to contain the virus that has already caused 35 confirmed infections and seven deaths.
Members of the Ebola treatment unit this past week at Mubende Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda.
Members of the Ebola treatment unit this past week at Mubende Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda.© Badru Katumba/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Scientists and health officials are now pushing to start clinical trials for two experimental vaccines to protect against this strain, which originated in Sudan in 1976. Even though there are relatively new and powerful Ebola vaccines, they do not protect against the Sudan strain — complicating efforts to quickly stamp out the disease before it overburdens the nation’s fragile health care system.

Diana Atwine, Uganda’s permanent secretary of the Ministry of Health, announcing an Ebola case at a Sept. 20 news conference in Kampala, the capital.
Diana Atwine, Uganda’s permanent secretary of the Ministry of Health, announcing an Ebola case at a Sept. 20 news conference in Kampala, the capital.© Hajarah Nalwadda/Associated Press
In central Uganda, where the cases were reported, at least six medical workers have contracted the virus, leading some of their peers to request transfer elsewhere. Parents, concerned their children will catch the highly contagious virus, are withdrawing them from schools. And in a nation that has faced multiple Ebola outbreaks since it reported its first case in 2000, worries persist that another fast-spreading virus could precipitate restrictions that would devastate an economy still reeling from coronavirus shutdowns.

Workers from Doctors Without Borders set up an Ebola treatment isolation unit at the Mubende regional referral hospital this week.
Workers from Doctors Without Borders set up an Ebola treatment isolation unit at the Mubende regional referral hospital this week.© Badru Katumba/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

“The whole situation gives me a lot of worry,” Yonas Tegegn Woldemariam, the World Health Organization’s representative to Uganda, said in a phone interview.
With the virus spreading to a fourth district on Friday and affecting an area covering a radius of more than 75 miles, “we are at a disadvantage,” he said.
Ebola is a highly contagious disease that is transmitted through contact with sick or dead people or animals, causing fever, fatigue, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding. The 2014-16 outbreak in West Africa was the deadliest Ebola epidemic, killing more than 11,300 people, followed by the 2018 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo that killed 2,280 people.
So far, Ugandan officials have ruled out issuing stay-at-home orders or curfews, or restricting movement in schools, markets or houses of worship.
“There is no need for anxiety, panic, restriction of movements or unnecessary closure of public places,” President Yoweri Museveni said after a televised speech this week. Mr. Museveni, who introduced stringent lockdowns during the onset of the coronavirus pandemic two years ago, said his nation had the ability to bring the Ebola virus to heel.
Uganda is also working with neighboring countries, including Rwanda and Kenya, to step up vigilance at land borders and at airports.

The latest outbreak in Uganda became public on Sept. 20, when health officials announced they had confirmed a case in a 24-year-old man who had been admitted to a hospital in the Mubende district, about 90 miles from the capital, Kampala.
The patient had developed symptoms — including high fever and bleeding in the eyes — as early as Sept. 11, and had traveled to multiple clinics seeking assistance. He was eventually isolated and hospitalized on Sept. 15, but died five days later.
In his televised address, Mr. Museveni said the patient had said people with similar symptoms from his village had also died.
The delay in identifying and tracing the first human case, along with the fact that it was reported in a district abutting a key highway, has raised the concerns that the virus has spread to major urban centers and neighboring countries. The W.H.O. has said there were at least 18 more probable deaths and 19 more infections linked to the current outbreak.
The Sudan strain of the virus was last detected by Uganda in 2012. Those infected cannot spread the virus until symptoms appear, which can come after an incubation period ranging from two to 21 days.
Existing vaccines — like the injectable vaccine Ervebo, which proved successful in tackling the Zaire strain in the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo — do not protect against the Sudan strain.
But experts hope that will soon change.
Mr. Yonas said at least six vaccine candidates were at different phases of development that can possibly guard against the Sudan strain. Two of those vaccines could proceed to a clinical trial in Uganda in the coming weeks after facing regulatory and ethics reviews from the Ugandan government.

The two vaccines likely to go ahead are being developed by the Washington-based Sabin Vaccine Institute and the University of Oxford. If approved, the single-dose Sabin vaccine would most likely be the first in line for trial. As new evidence emerges on the remaining vaccine candidates, the W.H.O. said it would work with an independent group of experts to help evaluate their suitability.
For now, health officials and multiple nongovernmental organizations are responding to the crisis by training medical workers, setting up new isolation units and facilitating more laboratories for testing.
More than 400 people who came into contact with those infected have also been successfully traced. Two patients were also discharged from hospital late on Friday, according to the W.H.O.
Officials have also started multiple outreach campaigns to educate the public on how to protect themselves, not stigmatize the infected and report those showing symptoms, said Oluma Jacob, a health adviser with Medical Teams International, an aid group responding to the outbreak.
This was done, he said, because “there was fear and a lot of panic in the community” when the cases were first reported in central Uganda.
That panic was evident among parents in Mubende district, where the first case was detected.
Nkwesiga Maxim, the principal of St. Kizito Madudu Roman Catholic Primary School in Mubende, said that more than half of the school’s students had not been attending classes.
“We have too much fear,” he said.
His sentiments were echoed by frontline health workers, who say the lack of proper compensation and protection — particularly for medical interns — was putting their lives at risk. The six health workers who were infected included four doctors, an anesthesiologist and a medical student, Mr. Museveni said. On Saturday, Uganda’s health minister announced that one of the doctors had died.
Luswata Herbert, the secretary general of the Uganda Medical Association, said that if the government did not remedy the situation quickly, “health workers will refuse to attend to patients because they fear for their lives and their rights.”





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CDC, WHO, Uganda to host regional meeting as Ebola spreads

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NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Uganda next week will host a ministerial meeting on the outbreak of the Sudan strain of the Ebola virus which has no proven vaccine and has caused alarm in the East Africa region.
A medical attendant disinfects the rubber boots of a medical officer before leaving the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
A medical attendant disinfects the rubber boots of a medical officer before leaving the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Acting director Ahmed Ogwell told journalists on Thursday the three countries that suffered the devastating West Africa outbreak of Ebola in 2014-16, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, also are invited to the Oct. 12 meeting.

A medical officer from the Uganda Red Cross Society instructs people with suspected Ebola symptoms to enter an ambulance, in Madudu, near Mubende, in Uganda, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
A medical officer from the Uganda Red Cross Society instructs people with suspected Ebola symptoms to enter an ambulance, in Madudu, near Mubende, in Uganda, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
The current Ebola outbreak in central Uganda has a 69% case fatality rate, which Ogwell called “very high,” and four health workers are among the 30 people who have died. There have been 43 confirmed cases. None have been in the capital, Kampala.

A medical attendant stands by rubber boots hung up to dry after being disinfected, outside the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
A medical attendant stands by rubber boots hung up to dry after being disinfected, outside the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Ogwell said the exposure of health workers was at the beginning of the outbreak “when we did not know what we were dealing with,” and he dismissed the suggestion that the infections signaled the outbreak was getting out of hand.





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He said more than 860 active contacts have been listed and at least 78% of them are being monitored, a situation that has almost doubled from a week ago.
The Africa CDC said it has procured 20,000 test kits that should arrive early next week for the region, and it will ship stockpiles of personal protective equipment next week.
Ebola can be difficult to detect at first because fever is also a symptom of malaria. Ebola, which manifests as a viral hemorrhagic fever, is spread through contact with bodily fluids of an infected person or contaminated materials. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pain and at times internal and external bleeding.

Doctors walk inside the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors walk inside the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Uganda has had multiple Ebola outbreaks, including one in 2000 that killed more than 200 people.


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Ebola is spreading in Uganda

An outbreak of Ebola virus disease is spreading in central Uganda, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which issued an advisory about the outbreak Thursday.
Doctors walk inside the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response.
Doctors walk inside the Ebola isolation section of Mubende Regional Referral Hospital, in Mubende, Uganda Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. In this remote Ugandan community facing its first Ebola outbreak, testing trouble has added to the challenges with symptoms of the Sudan strain of Ebola now circulating being similar to malaria, underscoring the pitfalls health workers face in their response.© Hajarah Nalwadda, Associated Press
And while the national public health agency says the risk in the United States is low and there are no cases identified, federal health officials told healthcare providers to watch for signs that the disease is here, according to The New York Times, which also reported that the Biden administration said on Thursday that travelers flying into the United States from Uganda would be diverted and screened.


According to a Level 3 travel advisory from the State Department, “all U.S.-bound passengers who have been in Uganda in the 21 days prior to their arrival” will be sent to be screened for Ebola at one of five U.S. airports: Atlanta, Chicago, New York, Newark and Washington, D.C.
“The enhanced screening applies to all passengers, including U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents, and visa holders (to include Diplomatic and Official visas),” the advisory stated.
The CDC also suggests that clinical laboratories “review information on specimen collection and transport and packaging and shipping for specimens suspected to contain Ebola virus.”
Nature reported that at least 64 people in Uganda are believed to have a rare species of Ebola virus for which no vaccines or treatment are available.” The articles said that 30 have died as the virus spread quickly across five districts in the African nation and “raised fears that the outbreak will not be easy to contain.
John Drake, a University of Georgia professor, wrote in Forbes that stopping the virus spread needs to be a high priority.

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“The current outbreak in Uganda is a reminder that a globally connected society is vulnerable to infectious diseases regardless of where they emerge,” Drake wrote. “Stopping outbreaks at the source is far more cost-effective than mitigating transmission after a pathogen is widespread. Whatever aid Uganda requires to get the current outbreak under control will no doubt be well worth the investment.



About Ebola

Ebola is a rare and deadly disease that can be found in both people and other primates. CDC says people can get infected through direct contact with an infected bat or primate, or a sick or dead person who was infected with the virus.
Related

The Nature article said the death rate from Ebola has in the past ranged from 25% to 90%. Sometimes, it can be dormant in someone and then spread to others, even years later.
Early symptoms include fever, vomiting, headaches and fatigue, but it can quickly spread to internal organs, which can lead to hemorrhaging and bruising. CDC says red eyes, skin rash and hiccups at the late stage can occur.
Those symptoms can appear from 2 to 21 days after contact with the virus.


No vaccine available

While drug companies developed vaccines and treatments for one form of Ebola after an epidemic that lasted from 2013 to 2016, Nature reports that therapies are still being developed for Sudan ebolavirus, which is what is killing people right now in Uganda. There’s no vaccine or treatment on the market against it at the moment.
The World Health Organization says that four of the five previous Ebola outbreaks were Sudan ebolavirus. The international public health agency also said that just four people have recovered in the current Ugandan outbreak.





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Uganda Ebola epidemic death toll climbs to 44: WHO

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The death toll from an Ebola epidemic declared last month in Uganda has climbed to 44, the World Health Organization said on Wednesday.
The authorities say the outbreak remains concentrated in the central districts of Mubende and Kassanda has not reached Kampala
The authorities say the outbreak remains concentrated in the central districts of Mubende and Kassanda has not reached Kampala© BADRU KATUMBA
WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told a press briefing in Geneva that there had been 60 confirmed and 20 probable cases, with 44 deaths and 25 recoveries.
"We remain concerned that there may be more chains of transmission and more contacts than we know about in the affected communities," he added.
The previous death toll provided by the WHO on October 5 reported 29 fatalities.
President Yoweri Museveni last week ordered two districts at the heart of the epidemic in central Uganda to be put under lockdown, imposing a travel ban, a curfew and the closure of public places.
Museveni had already ordered traditional healers to stop treating the sick, in a bid to stop the spread of the virus.




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He also ordered the police to arrest anyone infected with Ebola who refused to isolate.

The authorities say the outbreak remains concentrated in the central districts of Mubende and Kassanda has not reached Kampala, despite a couple testing positive for the virus in the capital.
Tedros on Wednesday said two cases from Mubende sought care in Kampala, "increasing the risks of transmission in the city" of 1.5 million people.
Ebola is spread through bodily fluids, with common symptoms being fever, vomiting, bleeding and diarrhea.
Outbreaks are difficult to contain, especially in urban environments.
Uganda's last recorded fatality from a previous Ebola outbreak was in 2019.
The particular strain now circulating in Uganda is known as the Sudan Ebola virus, for which there is currently no vaccine.
The World Health Organization says clinical trials could start within weeks on drugs to combat that strain.





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WHO: Ugandan Ebola outbreak 'rapidly evolving' after 1 month

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Uganda's Ebola outbreak is “rapidly evolving” a month after the disease was reported in the East African country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers.
Doctors disinfect themselves after visiting a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors disinfect themselves after visiting a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
“The Ministry of Health of Uganda has shown remarkable resilience and effectiveness and (is) constantly fine-tuning a response to what is a challenging situation,” Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, the U.N. health agency's regional director for Africa, told reporters. “A better understanding of the chains of transmission is helping those on the ground respond more effectively.”
Uganda declared an outbreak of Ebola on Sept. 20, several days after the contagious disease began spreading in a rural farming community. Ebola has since infected 64 people and killed 24, although official figures do not include people who likely died of Ebola before the outbreak was confirmed.

Doctors wearing protective equipment pray together before they visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors wearing protective equipment pray together before they visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
At least three of the confirmed patients traveled from the virus hot spot in central Uganda to the capital, Kampala, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) away, according to Moeti. Fears that Ebola could spread far from the outbreak's epicenter caused authorities to impose a lockdown, including nighttime curfews, on two of the five districts reporting Ebola cases.

Protective equipment is laid outside to dry after being disinfected, outside the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Protective equipment is laid outside to dry after being disinfected, outside the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Ebola “numbers that we are seeing do pose a risk for spread within the country and its neighbors,” Dr. Ahmed Ogwell, the acting head of the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a separate briefing Thursday.
While the risk of cross-border contamination is there, “it's a manageable risk,” Ogwell said, adding that the outbreak does not yet necessitate going into what he called “full emergency mode.”

A doctor puts on protective equipment as he prepares to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
A doctor puts on protective equipment as he prepares to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
There is no proven vaccine for the Sudan strain of Ebola that's circulating in Uganda. A WHO official in Uganda told the AP Wednesday that plans are underway to deploy two experimental vaccines in a study targeting health workers and contacts of Ebola patients.

Doctors wearing protective equipment are seen after visiting a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors wearing protective equipment are seen after visiting a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Ugandan officials have documented more than 1,800 Ebola contacts, 747 of whom have completed 21 days of monitoring for possible signs of the disease that manifests as a viral hemorrhagic fever, Ogwell said.

Ebola is spread by contact with bodily fluids of an infected person or contaminated materials. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pain and, at times, internal and external bleeding.
Scientists don’t know the natural reservoir of Ebola, but they suspect the first person infected in an outbreak acquired the virus through contact with an infected animal or eating its raw meat. Ugandan officials are still investigating the source of the current outbreak.
Uganda has had multiple Ebola outbreaks, including one in 2000 that killed more than 200 people. The 2014-16 Ebola outbreak in West Africa killed more than 11,000 people, the disease’s largest death toll.

Doctors put on protective equipment as they prepare to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors put on protective equipment as they prepare to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Ebola was discovered in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks in South Sudan and Congo, where it occurred in a village near the Ebola River, after which the disease is named.
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Larson reported from Dakar, Senegal.

Doctors put on protective equipment as they prepare to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors put on protective equipment as they prepare to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press
Doctors put on protective equipment as they prepare to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is rapidly evolving a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)
Doctors put on protective equipment as they prepare to visit a patient who was in contact with an Ebola victim, in the isolation section of Entebbe Regional Referral Hospital in Entebbe, Uganda Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022. Uganda's Ebola outbreak is "rapidly evolving" a month after the disease was reported in the country, a top World Health Organization official said Thursday, describing a difficult situation for health workers on the ground. (AP Photo/Hajarah Nalwadda)© Provided by The Associated Press





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