Black People : ANGER GENE?!!?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Kemetstry, Mar 10, 2007.

  1. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    1st it was the dreaded scourge of PMS. Now a recent study indicates that there could be a genetic link as well. Tracking over 500 women in Europe, scientists have discovered a gene that makes some more prone to anger and all that is associated with it. These women are also more prone to serious heat disease. So, is this you?
     
  2. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Eventually there could be a treatment or a pill to curb hostility - Are we close to this treatment? The understanding of genes and their effect on emotions is still in the early stages but the findings are more than likely going to include environmental and genetic factors on anger. Previous studies have concluded that serotonin had fit into the equation but of late it has thought to be the cause of a variation in the serotonin transporter gene. It goes into the depth of the molecular depth of the gene.
    A variation in some women's genes may make them angry individuals - even to the point of hostility and may lead to an array of medical problems. Apparently there is a tiny variation in a gene that we all have that may make certain individuals more prone to anger than those who do not have the variation in the gene. The report also found that the individuals who have this gene variation are also more susceptible to having higher than average blood pressure. The blood pressure may rise to frightening levels in the individuals who have the variation of the gene, which would appear as the longer allele. Interestingly aggression and hostility are predictors of high blood pressure!
    Although still in its early stages the research that examines genes that affect the brain and could help scientists gain a better look at anger, emotions and health.
    Studies have shown that human emotions are effected by genes that control aspects of brain function.
    "Edward C. Suarez, an associate research professor at the Duke University Health System, said the research suggests that "elevated levels of hostility and aggression are associated with genetic variations that may play in a role in the development of some chronic medical conditions."
    The gene that some have coined the anger gene is the serotonin transporter gene.
    It would be beneficial to find this anger gene because it could enable us to predict those who are more prone to anger-related behavior. Research indicates that those with the long allele of the serotonin transporter gene exhibited higher blood pressures and had greater heart rate responses to a mental stress protocol when compared to subjects that were homozygous for the short allele of the gene and thereby making the longer allele more prone to anger.
    These findings are significant because they may aid in establishing a potential marker for certain conditions associated with aggression and anger.




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  3. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    WebMD News Archive
    Angry? It May Be in Your Genes
    Study: Variations in Gene May Raise or Lower Women's Aggression, Hostility
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    Miranda Hitti
    WebMD Health News
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
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    March 9, 2007 -- Genetics may affect women's anger, hostility, and physical aggression, University of Pittsburgh scientists announced today.
    Indrani Halder, PhD, and colleagues studied 550 unrelated women of European descent. The women completed two aggression and hostility questionnaires.

    Halder's team also analyzed variations in the women's HTR2C gene. That gene is one of many genes linked to a brain chemical called serotonin.
    Past studies have linked high serotonin levels to lower aggression levels, note Halder and colleagues.
    The new study shows that women with one alteration in the HTR2C gene were less aggressive, while women with a different alteration in the gene were more physically aggressive. A third alteration in the gene didn't seem to affect aggression or hostility.
    Continue reading below...
    The study doesn't prove that those gene mutations made the women more or less angry, aggressive, or hostile than other women. The results don’t provide any information on the women's life experiences, other personality traits, or strategies for handling anger.
    The researchers only studied women, so it's not clear if the findings apply to men.
    Halder is due to present the findings today in Budapest, Hungary at the American Psychosomatic Society's 65th Annual Scientific Conference.





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