Black People : An Overseas Family Reunion: Surinam

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Aluku, May 11, 2012.

  1. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As some of you already know I'm from Surinam. Our experience is similar to most slavery experiences in the new world.

    What is not similar is that the culture our ancestors took with them from Africa is virtually unchanged from when they first came.

    Songs have survived, Rituals have survived, Social structure has survived, Stories have survived.

    This is due to the fact of our large maroon population, relatively speaking, of about 50,000 who didn't let the culture of the European influence or corrupt them. They rule their villages autonomously and have done so for over 300 years.

    When you visit some of these Maroon villages you are literally stepping back into time some 300+ years.

    Over the years I have begun to realize that our history of Surinam is not just for Surinam but is something that needs to be shared with our brothers and sisters in the Diaspora, because what we were able to preserve will hopefully help others to take a look into the past that has largely been lost in most of the new world. Unfortunately most of our resources are in Dutch, which is our official language.

    When I'm able to post links I will post some resources that hopefully will make sense of this :)

    For those who are interested I can give you 2 resources which are available in English:

    1. John Gabriel Stedman's Narrative of a Five Years Expedition Against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam (Newly Transcribed from the Original 1790 Manuscript, Edited, and with an Introduction and Notes, by Richard and Sally Price)

    2. Saramaka Social Structure: Analysis of a Maroon Society in Surinam

    Richard & Sally Price did an amazing job researching and explaining The Saramaka Maroons, aka Saamaka, but this is just one of the many maroon societies in Surinam.

    Some other Maroon societies in Surinam are Ndjuka, Aluku, Matawai, Paramaka, Kwinti.

    They are largely organized based on the plantation they originally escaped from and increased their ranks by raiding other plantations. During these raids they took guns, tools, added the slaves to their ranks and usually killed all the whites and burned down the plantation.
     
  2. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Here you can see a spiritual dance from the maroons. They get in trance (winti) and can eat glass, dance on glass and lay on glass without being harmed. They also touch fire, dance on fire.



    This a random performance by Maroon dance group, for tourists

     
  3. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you!

    Free African societies are the best African societies.

    HTP
     
  4. Aluku

    Aluku Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is a short snippet of a documentary. A Surinamese film maker went to Kromanti, Ghana to explore some of Suriname's roots, and on the return trip the Kromanti native follows him to Surinam:

    Part 1



    Part 2



    An American perspective of the Saramaka Maroons from FoodNetwork's Andrew Zimmer:

     
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