Black Spirituality Religion : An Apocryphal Discourse on the Horrible Cruelties of the Invading Gentiles...

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Aqil, Oct 4, 2003.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,029
    Likes Received:
    114
    Location:
    New York
    Ratings:
    +114
    When I first read this, I overstood why the bishops of the Nicene Council in 325 AD refused to include the Books of the Apocrypha in the canonized Bible. From 2nd Maccabees:

    "Not long after this, the king sent an Athenian senator to compel the Jews to forsake the laws of their fathers and cease to live by the laws of God, and also to pollute the temple in Jerusalem and call it the temple of Olympian Zeus, and to call the one in Ger'izim the temple of Zeus the Friend of Strangers, as did the people who dwelt in that place.

    Harsh and utterly grievous was the onslaught of evil. For the temple was filled with debauchery and reveling by the Gentiles, who dallied with harlots and had intercourse with women within the sacred precincts, and besides brought in things for sacrifice that were unfit. The altar was covered with abominable offerings that were forbidden by the laws. A man could neither keep the Sabbath, nor observe the feasts of his fathers, nor so much as confess himself to be a Jew.

    On the monthly celebration of the king's birthday, the Jews were taken, under bitter constraint, to partake of the sacrifices; and when the feast of Diony'sus came, they were compelled to walk in the procession in honor of Diony'sus, wearing wreaths of ivy. At the suggestion of Ptolemy a decree was issued to the neighboring Greek cities, that they should adopt the same policy toward the Jews and make them partake of the sacrifices, and should slay those who did not choose to change over to Greek customs.

    One could see, therefore, the misery that had come upon them. For example, two women were brought in for having circumcised their children. These women they publicly paraded about the city, with their babies hung at their breasts, then hurled them down headlong from the wall. Others who had assembled in the caves near by, to observe the seventh day secretly, were betrayed to Philip and were all burned together, because their piety kept them from defending themselves, in view of their regard for that most holy day.

    Now I urge those who read this book not to be depressed by such calamities, but to recognize that these punishments were designed not to destroy, but to discipline our people. In fact, not to let the impious alone for long, but to punish them immediatetly, is a sign of great kindness. For in the case of the other nations the Lord waits patiently to punish them until they have reached the full measure of their sins; but he does not deal in this way with us in order that he may not take vengeance on us afterward when our sins have reached their height.

    Therefore he never withdraws his mercy from us, though he disciplines us with calamities, he does not forsake his own people. Let what we have said serve as a reminder; we must go on briefly with the story.

    Eleazar, one of the scribes in high position, a man now advanced in age and of noble presence, was being forced to open his mouth to eat swine's flesh. But he, welcoming death with honor rather than life with pollution, went up to the rack of his own accord, spitting out the flesh, as men ought to go who have the courage to refuse things that it is not right to taste, even for the natural love of life.

    Those who were in charge of that unlawful sacrifice took the man aside, because of their long acquaintance with him, and privately urged him to bring food of his own providing, proper for him to use, and pretend that he was eating the flesh of the sacrificial meal which had been commanded by the king, so that by doing this he might be saved from death, and be treated kindly on account of his old friendship with them.

    But making a high resolve worthy of his years and the dignity in his old age and the grey hairs, which he had reached with distinction and his excellent life even from childhood, moreover according to the holy, God-given law, he declared himself quickly, telling them to send him to Hades. 'Such pretence is not worthy of our time of life,' he said, 'lest many of the young should suppose that Eleazar, in his ninetieth year, has gone over to an alien religion, and through my pretence, for the sake of living a brief moment longer, they should be led astray because of me, while I defile and disgrace my old age.

    For even if for the present I should avoid the punishment of men, yet whether I live or die I shall not escape the hands of the Almighty. Therefore, by manfully giving up my life now, I will show myself worthy of my old age, and leave to the young a noble example of how to die a good death willingly and nobly for the revered and holy laws.'

    When he had said this, he went at once to the rack. And those who a little before had acted toward him with good will now changed to ill will, because the words he had uttered were in their opinion sheer madness. When he was about to die under the blows, he groaned aloud and said: 'It is clear to the Lord in his holy knowledge that, though I might have been saved from life, I am enduring terrible suffering under this beating, but in my soul I am glad to suffer these things because I fear him.'

    So in this way he died, leaving in his death an example of nobility and a memorial of courage, not only to the young, but also to the great body of his nation.

    It happened also that seven brothers and their mother were being compelled by the king, under whips and cords, to partake of the unlawful swine’s flesh. One of them, acting as their spokesman, said, 'What do you intend to ask and learn from us? For we are ready to die rather than transgress the laws of our fathers.' The king fell into a rage, and gave orders that pans and caldrons be heated. These were heated immediately, and he commanded that the tongue of their spokesman be cut out, and that they cut off his hands and feet, while the rest of the brothers and the mother looked on.

    When he was utterly helpless, the king ordered them to take him to the fire, still breathing, and to fry him in a pan. The smoke from the pan spread widely, but the brothers and their mother encouraged one another to die nobly, saying, 'The Lord God is watching over us and in truth has compassion on us, as Moses declared in this song which bore witness against the people to their faces, when he asked, "And he will have compassion on his servants."

    After the first brother had died in this way, they brought forward the second for their sport. They tore off the skin of his head with the hair, and asked him, 'Will you eat rather than have your body punished limb by limb?' He replied in the language of his fathers, and said to them, 'No.' Therefore he in turn underwent tortures as the first brother had done. And when he was at his last breath, he said, "You accursed wretch, you dismiss us from this present life, but the King of the universe will raise us up to an everlasting renewal of life, because we have died for his laws.'

    After him, the third was the victim of their sport. When it was demanded, he quickly put out his tongue and courageously stretched forth his hands, and said nobly, 'I got these from Heaven, and because of his laws I disdain them, and from him I hope to get them back again.' As a result the king himself – and those with him – were astonished at the young man's spirit, for he regarded his sufferings as nothing.

    When he too had died, they maltreated and tortured the fourth in the same way. And when he was near death, he said, 'One cannot but choose to die at the hands of men, and to cherish the hope that God gives of being raised again by Him. But for you there will be no resurrection to life!'

    Next they brought forward the fifth and maltreated him. But he looked at the and said, 'Because you have authority among men, mortal though you are, you do what you please. But do not think that God has forsaken our people. Keep on, and see how his mighty power will torture you and your descendants!'

    After him they brought forward the sixth. And when he was about to die, he said, 'Do not deceive yourself in vain. For we are suffering these things on our own account, because of our sins against our own God. Therefore, astounding things have happened. But do not think that you will go unpunished for having tried to fight against God!'

    The mother was especially admirable and worthy of honorable memory. Though she saw her seven sons perish within a single day, she bore it with good courage because of her hope in the Lord. She encouraged each of them in the language of their fathers. Filled with a noble spirit, she fired her woman's reasoning with a man's courage, and said to them:

    'I do not know how you came into being in my womb. It was not I who gave you life and breath, nor I who set in order the elements within each of you. Therefore the Creator of the world, who shaped the beginning of man and devised the origin of all things, will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again, since you now forget yourselves for the sake of his laws.'

    Antiochus felt that he was being treated with contempt, and he was suspicious of her reproachful tone. The youngest brother, being still alive, Antiochus not only appealed to him in words, but promised with oaths that he would make him rich and enviable if he would turn from the ways of his fathers, and that he would take him for his friend and entrust him with public affairs.

    Since the young man would not listen to him at all, the king called the mother to him and urged her to advise the youth to save himself. After much urging on his part, she undertook to persuade her son. But, leaning close to him, she spoke in their native tongue as follows, deriding the cruel tyrant:

    “My son, have pity on me. I carried you nine months in my womb, and nursed you for three years, and have reared you and brought you up to this point in your life, and have taken care of you. I beseech you, my child, to look at the heaven and the earth and see everything that is in them, and recognize that God did not make them out of things that existed Thus also mankind comes into being. Do not a fear this butcher, but prove worthy of your brothers. Accept death, so that in God's mercy I may get you back again with your brothers.”

    While she was still speaking, the young man said:

    'What are you waiting for? I will not obey the king's command, but I obey the command of the law that was given to our fathers through Moses. But you who have contrived all sorts of evil against the Hebrews, will certainly not escape the hands of God.

    For we are suffering because of our own sins, and if our living Lord is angry for a little while, to rebuke and discipline us, he will again be reconciled with his own servants. But you, unholy wretch, you most defiled of all men, do not be elated in vain and puffed up by uncertain hopes, when you raise your hand against the children of heaven. You have not yet escaped the judgment of the almighty, all-seeing God. For our brothers, after enduring a brief suffering, have drunk of ever-flowing life under God's covenant; but you, by the judgment of God, will receive just punishment for your arrogance.

    I, like my brothers, give up body and life for the laws of our fathers, appealing to God to show mercy soon to our nation, and by afflictions and plagues to make you confess that He alone is God, and through me and my brothers to bring to an end the wrath of the mighty which has justly fallen on whole nation.'

    The king fell into a rage, and handled him worse than the others, being exasperated at his scorn. So he died in his integrity, putting his whole trust in the Lord. Last of all, the mother died, after her sons.

    Let this be enough, then, about the eating of sacrifices and the extreme tortures.'"

    (2nd Maccabees 6 & 7:1-42, Books of the Apocrypha)
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,029
    Likes Received:
    114
    Location:
    New York
    Ratings:
    +114
    "Eleazar, one of the scribes in high position, a man now advanced in age and of noble presence, was being forced to open his mouth to eat swine's flesh. But he, welcoming death with honor rather than life with pollution, went up to the rack of his own accord, spitting out the flesh, as men ought to go who have the courage to refuse things that it is not right to taste, even for the natural love of life..."

    (2nd Maccabees 6:18-20, Books of the Apocrypha)
     
  3. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,029
    Likes Received:
    114
    Location:
    New York
    Ratings:
    +114
    These and many other horrible atrocities were perpetrated on the indigenous people of Africa by the invading Europeans...
     
  4. DreamFunk

    DreamFunk Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 27, 2003
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Memphis10/ VA
    Ratings:
    +6
    Re: AN APOCRYPHAL DISCOURSE ON THE HORRIBLE CRUELTY OF THE INVADING GENTILES...

    ....misery loves company.
     
  5. DreamFunk

    DreamFunk Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 27, 2003
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Memphis10/ VA
    Ratings:
    +6
    ...the Maccabees were a priestly family of Jews who organized the successful rebellion against the Greek Seleucid dynasty.....the first three books of Maccabees were written between 100-63 BC, while Judea (Palestine) was free from Greek/Roman rule...

    ...it is not suprising that Maccabees isn't in our traditional Bible.....if the writtings of early Christainiy went against Greco-Rome, it was excluded from the canonized Bible (what we know today)....for the institution of Christianity was a tool of Roman/European power....it is a preverted form of the knowledge they were given to them.....

    ....and one of the main critieria that a text had to have in order to be included into the Roman Canonized Bible was that it had to mention 'The Cross'...it is also important to know that the Roman Emperor Constintine had a dream that he would "conqure the world by The Cross"...none of the original writings said that 'Jesus' actually died on a "cross"; the word usually translated as "cross" is the Greek word "stauros", which means 'stake' or 'pole'.....also, other accounts speak of him dying on a "tree".....
     
  6. ifasehun

    ifasehun Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Messages:
    381
    Likes Received:
    19
    Ratings:
    +19
    i dont believe that a word of this happened. show me one african source, story or scripture that marks this moment.

    by the way, only the Kemetic people refused to eat swine. but not because they viewed it as unholy - its because they identified it with arabs. who quickly took to ban it from their diet to remove the stigma. lol (re-check your Coming forth by Day and Night and you will see that Kemetic/Egyptian people didnt like Arabs and they didnt like Muslims.- which may explain why Arabic Muslims sought to destroy Kemet and pretend ownership of its greatness.)

    for those of us that pride ourselves on being African know this: Pork is recognized as less healthy than other meats (which for the record are all poor sources of nutrition) - but not unholy. AFRICANS view pigs as we do all animals - creatures of God.

    secondly, any man or woman that is an African that has contempt for partaking in a meal connected with sacrifice might very well have met the wrath of his fellow African, much less Greeks. lol AFRICANS BELIEVE IN SACRIFICE. The Greeks learned the concept of tribute to God and Ancestors from us, not the other way around. not taking part in a meal connected with a ritual is like spitting on the graves of the Ancestors and cursing God Himself - by African standards. Maybe Jews, Christians and Muslims dont see it that way, but they aint afrocentric are they?

    Seeing that this IS an afrocentric message board I think we ought to keep in mind what our ANCESTORS would think on this occasion. Which is simple: If a genuine ritual has taken place and meals are served: Open your darn mouth, fellowship with your brothers and sisters, show thanks and pray for continued blessings.

    in any case, if she whispered in the boy's ear to refuse the bribe of wealth and then she was quickly killed - how is it that we know what she said to the boy? either she didnt whisper, or she wasnt killed. which was it?
    - this story has no logical, historical or religious basis. its pure folly. another one of the many "weird stories" that float around the judeo-christian so-called tradition.
     
  7. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,029
    Likes Received:
    114
    Location:
    New York
    Ratings:
    +114
    The Apocrypha are books or portions of books which appear in the Latin Vulgate, either as part of the Old Testament or as an appendix, but which are not in the Hebrew Bible. With the exception of 2 Esdras these books appear in the Greek Old Testament known as the “Septuagint.” The Deuterocanonical books consist of the Apocrypha, except for 1 and 2 Esdras and the Prayer of Manasseh. In view of the importance of the Apocrypha in the present edition it will be in place to say something here of their origin.

    These books were written mostly between the 2nd century BC and the first century AD, and, though a number of them were originally written in Hebrew, they seem to have circulated chiefly in the Greek version outside Palestine, especially in Egypt. The books were perhaps less acceptable to the Jerusalem Jews of the Pharisaic tradition, but they were certainly used in Palestine inasmuch as fragments have been found at Qumran among the Dead Sea Scrolls. A few other writings were sometimes included in the Greek manuscripts, such as Psalm 151, 3 and 4 Maccabees, and the Psalms of Solomon.

    The first Christians were Aramaic-speaking Jews of Palestine who were familiar with the Hebrew Scriptures, but, very soon, those of Greek speech, whether Jew or Gentile, far outnumbered those who spoke Aramaic, and the Bible they used was normally the Greek Septuagint translation with its extra books. This was in effect the Christian Old Testament and it remained their only text for the greater part of two centuries.

    Towards the end of the first century AD, at Jamnia, the Jews decided that only books written in Hebrew and not later than Ezra were to be considered as inspired and canonical. Though some of the books then included are now known to have been written after the time of Ezra, the criteria did serve to exclude the extra literature referred to above. The need for a decision was prompted in part by the growing controversies with the Christians and the use they made of the Scriptures.

    In the absence of any definition of the Canon by Christian authorities, the clearly defined Hebrew Canon was always liable to exert an influence on Christian thinking. In the 4th century a number of prominent Fathers expressly declared that these extra books were non-canonical and so less authoritative than the books of the Hebrew Canon, and were to be read only for edification. Nevertheless, side by side with the expression of these opinions, Christians continued to use Greek and Latin Bibles with the extra books, which moreover were distributed throughout the Old Testament and not gathered into a single group.

    The great controversy over the canonical character of these books towards the end of the 4th century, in which Augustine and Jerome were the champions respectively for and against, eventuated in the decision of the Councils of Africa, approved by Rome, that the Christian Canon of the Old Testament consisted of the books of the Hebrew Canon together with seven others, namely, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, Tobit, Judith, and 1 and 2 Maccabees, and parts of two others, namely, Daniel and Esther, which were included in the Greek Septuagint and Latin Vulgate.

    In addition to these books, three others, namely, 1 and 2 Esdras and the Prayer of Manasseh, though not included in the Canon by the Councils, were nevertheless regarded as enjoying a position of esteem in view of their widespread Christian usage, especially in the liturgy. For this reason, they were included in editions of the Vulgate. In spite of the decisions of the Councils, including that of the Council of Florence (1441 AD) in favor of the longer Canon, doubts about the extra books of the Greek and Latin Bibles continued to be expressed from time to time up to the Reformation.

    In the 16th century the Reformers rejected those books in the Vulgate that they did not find in the Hebrew Canon. Thus in Luther's German translation of the Bible (1534) the Apocrypha (with 1 and 2 Esdras omitted) stands between the Testaments with the title: "Apocrypha, that is, books which are not held equal to the sacred Scriptures, and nevertheless are useful and good to read."

    Coverdale's English translation of the Bible (1535) gave them the same position (except Baruch and the Prayer of Manasseh), with the title: "Apocrypha. The books and treatises which were among the fathers of old are not reckoned to be authority with the other books of the Bible, neither are they found in the of the Hebrew."

    The Apocrypha had a place in all the 16th century translations of the Bible. Matthew's Bible of 1537 was the first English Version to place all of the Apocrypha in a separate group. In the King James Version of 1611 they stand between theTestaments and there are a few cross-references to passages in them. In the Catholic Rheims-Douay Version (1609), the Deuterocanonical Books are placed among the Old Testament writings, as in the Vulgate, with 1 and 2 Esdras printed as an appendix to the Old Testament as "not received into the Canon of Divine Scriptures by the Catholic Church." Article VI of the "Thirty-Nine Articles Church of England" says concerning the Apocrypha: "And the other books (as Hierome saith) the Church doth read for example of life and instruction of manners, but yet it doth not apply them to establish doctrine."

    It was during the Reformation period that the terms "Apocrypha" and "Deuterocanonical Books" came into general use. The word "Apocrypha" means, "hidden," and was often applied to books that were withheld from circulation because the authorship was in doubt or the teaching had been questioned. Hence the "Apocryphal" came to be the equivalent of "spurious," generally with the implication that the books should be avoided; and the Jews applied it to the mass of literature excluded from their sacred books when they defined their Canon.

    Jerome applied it to the small number of books that now bear that title and – largely because of his great authority – the Reformers adopted the same title for these books, though maintaining that they were to be read for edification. The term "deuterocanonical" used by Catholics was apparently coined by Sixtus of Siena in the 16th century to indicate those books in the Septuagint and Vulgate Old Testament which are not contained in the Hebrew.

    The Puritans opposed every use of these books that would suggest thai possessed any authority; and the Westminster Confession (1648) declares: "The books commonly called Apocrypha, not being of divine inspiration, are no of the Canon of Scripture; and therefore are of no authority in the Church of God, nor to be otherwise approved, or made use of, than other human writings."

    The Greek Orthodox Church, which uses the Greek Septuagint Version official text, has been accustomed to use the longer Canon of the Old Testament. The Ecumenical Council at Nicea in 787 AD, and the Council at Constantinople in 869 AD quote certain Apocrypha as authoritative. In the great Schism of 1054 Apocrypha were not an issue. They became more so at the time of the Protestant Reformation, and a short-lived attempt was made by Cyril Lukaris, Patriarch of Constantinople, to promote the adoption of the Hebrew Canon in the Greek Church. The question, however, was never regarded as quite so fundamental a doctrine as in the West.

    The basic Greek text of the books of the Apocrypha - from which the translation was made - is the edition of the Septuagint prepared by Alfred Rahlfs, and published by the Wurttemberg Bible Society, Stuttgart, 1935. This text is based mainly upon the Codex Vaticanus (4th century), the Codex Sinaiticus (4th century), and the Codex Alexandrinus (5th century). For the book of Tobit the Greek text found in the codices Vaticanus and Alexandrinus was followed; and for the Additions to Daniel (namely, Susanna, the Prayer of Azariah, the Song of the Three Young Men, and Bel and the Dragon) the translators used the Greek version of Theodotion.

    The basic text followed in the case of 2 Esdras is the Old Latin version edited by Robert L. Bensly. This was supplemented by consulting the Latin text edited by Bruno Violet, as well as the several Oriental versions of 2 Esdras, namely, the Syriac, Ethiopic, Arabic (two forms, referred to as Arabic 1 and Arabic 2), Armenian, and Georgian versions. In addition, account was taken of a few verses of the 15th chapter of 2 Esdras, which have been preserved in Greek (Oxyrhynchus Papyrus, #1010).

    In the translation of Sirach, constant reference was made to the medieval Hebrew fragments of a large part of this book, which were discovered at the end of the 19th century. Throughout the work of translating the books of the Apocrypha consideration was given to variant readings, including those in the apparatus criticus of Rahlfs, as well as those in other editions of the Septuagint or of single books of the Apocrypha. Likewise, a search was made for all portions of the Apocrypha preserved in the Greek papyri from Egypt, and the text of these fragments was collated with that of Rahlfs.

    The quarrels over the authority of the Apocrypha are now largely matters of the past, although variant views still are sincerely and strongly held. Today, the problem is approached, both theologically and historically, with understanding. Thus, among many Christian bodies there is an increasing interest in the Apocrypha, and the Vatican Secretariat for Christian Unity, together with the United Bible Societies has recently prepared guiding principles for inter-confessional translation, containing a formula for the inclusion of the Apocrypha in certain editions published by the Bible Societies.

    Though agreement in principle on the Old Testament Canon is probably out of immediate reach, nevertheless there seems no reason why an attempt should not be made to arrange the Books in a way that would meet with general assent from all denominations. There are present editions that represent such an attempt. The Apocrypha are placed between the Testaments, as is done normally in Protestant Bibles, but 1 and 2 Esdras and the Prayer of Manasseh have been transferred to the end of the Deuterocanonical Books, separated from them by a blank page and accompanied by a note explaining that they are not regarded as canonical by Catholics. There is thus for the first time a clear distinction which will, it is expected, commend itself to the different Christian denominations.

    (I beg to differ with you, Brother Ifasehun, for the Apocryphal stories that you refer to - and those that I have posted - certainly have religious, logical and historical basis.)
     
  8. ifasehun

    ifasehun Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Messages:
    381
    Likes Received:
    19
    Ratings:
    +19
    by the way, i thought we couldnt cut and paste works by other people. is this your clarification on the origin of this text or someone else's?
     
  9. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,029
    Likes Received:
    114
    Location:
    New York
    Ratings:
    +114
    I have an ecumenical edition of the Bible that contains the Apocyrpha/Deuterocanonical Books. I suggest you obtain one and do your own research...as I did...
     
  10. DreamFunk

    DreamFunk Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 27, 2003
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Memphis10/ VA
    Ratings:
    +6
    ...what do you mean by "african source"...???...are you that ethnocentric that you will turn your ear away from the history/knowledge/wisdom of those not like you....???...



    ...from where did that information come...???...that's not true...are you saying that Hebrews were Kemetic...???....being that many of their traditions come from out of Egypt, I can agree in a way....

    ...and the Ancient Kemetians didnt associate the pig with Arabs, where does this come from...???....generally, the pig was associated with their god Seth....the pig was shunned in Upper Egypt (southern), but it was eaten in Lower Egypt (northern)....

    ...Arabic Muslims dont claim the works of the Ancient Egyptians....they call it heathen paganism....Arab Egyptians want nothing to do with the the history of Ancient Egypt...

    ...and the 'Book of the Coming forth by Day and Night' was compiled well before Muslims, Christains, or Jews even existed......anyway, the Ancient Kemetians were VERY xenophobic, they disliked all foreigners....

    ...and if Arabs cared so little about the Kemetians, why would they change their lifestyle by stop eating pork in order to remove the stigma placed on them by the Kemetians...???....anyway, this question isnt even valid because the Arabs didnt overrun Egypt until waaaayy latter on in history (after Greek and Roman rule of the area)....



    ....so do I and the majority the world...but only scavengers eat anything (look around at the our world)....yes, some societies could only eat what was around them; but we most certainly have a choice....
    .....and that argument of "God made it so I can eat it" is foolish and very childish...

    ...but that is the problem, its not about "holiness" and "unholiness", but about life, health, and order....

    ....life isnt merely about following tradition, but about growth and learning....can the child not be wiser than his/her parent...???...the pursute of Truth and Wisdom should be the #1 priority....unless you are perfect in your ways, blind tradition plus isolation can do nothing but stagnize a people....



    .....no disrespect intended, but do you actually know who your ancestors are....???....your roots may be in Muslim Gambia, or even Christian Europe, let alone the Amerindian presence amoungst some of us.....

    .....and let me ask you this, is there anything that you would not eat (if it was generously offered to you)...???....
     
Loading...