Africa : Alkebulan - the real name of Africa (?)

Chevron Dove

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How do you define etymology and what would be acceptable to you?

I define etymology based on its definition presented:

The MERRIAN-WEBSTER:

the history of a linguistic form (such as a word) shown by tracing its development since its earliest recorded occurrence in the language where it is found, by tracing its transmission from one language to another, by analyzing it into its component parts, by identifying its cognates in other languages, or by tracing it and its cognates to a common ancestral form in an ancestral language
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/etymology

and, then Wikipedia:

Etymology … is the study of the history of words. [1] By extension, the term “the etymology (of a word)” means the origin of the particular word and for place names, there is a specific term, toponymy.

For Greek—with a long written history—etymologists make use of texts, and texts about the language, to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods and when they entered the language. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available.

By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary. In this way, word roots have been found that can be traced all the way back to the origin of, ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology
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I have looked at script to see this word used as far back as it has been scripted, and so far it has not been dated that far back in time even in any translations. But when I look at root words that compose the word 'ALKEBULAN' I can accept that Dr. Ben perhaps has formed his findings on root words like

Kebulan
Gebu
Jebus
El-Gebel ...

I see these root words in early script and therefore, I believe Dr. Ben and you, on this basis.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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...and so far it has not been dated that far back in time even in any translations. But when I look at root words that compose the word 'ALKEBULAN' I can accept that Dr. Ben perhaps has formed his findings on root words like
Kebulan Gebu Jebus El-Gebel ...
I see these root words in early script and therefore, I believe Dr. Ben and you, on this basis.

Well said and moreover, the Greeks and Romans simply destroyed the artifacts in order to create a "control tactic" as you rightly claimed earlier.

They changed the indigenous name to Africa, thus making it very difficult to recovery it's indigenous roots or confirmed etymology...



The name ‘Africa’ stems from the time when the Roman Empire took occupation of the majority of the continent. As is the practice in these type war times, the “Romans sought to completely disconnect the indigenous Africans with their culture, deities, and knowledge. This could only be successfully done by renaming the all archetypical icons, thereby disconnecting the significance, meaning, and sacredness from any specific archetype.”
(http://redsea1.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=2562581)

Read more about the Greek and Roman influence on Africa’s etymology.

As I stumbled across quite a few forums and discussions about this very matter, it became clear that there is a very present and real debate on the go about the origin of our continent’s name, and what I found is that our motherland’s true name is: Alkebulan.

According to the following resource: Kemetic History of Afrika; the definition of Alkebulan is as follows:
“The ancient name of Africa was Alkebulan.
Alkebu-lan “mother of mankind” or “garden of eden”.
Alkebulan is the oldest and the only word of indigenous origin. It was used by the Moors, Nubians, Numidians, Khart-Haddans (Carthagenians), and Ethiopians.

Africa, the current misnomer adopted by almost everyone today , was given to this continent by the ancient Greeks and Romans. ”

...
 
Last edited:

Chevron Dove

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The name ‘Africa’ stems from the time when the Roman Empire took occupation of the majority of the continent. As is the practice in these type war times, the “Romans sought to completely disconnect the indigenous Africans with their culture, deities, and knowledge. This could only be successfully done by renaming the all archetypical icons, thereby disconnecting the significance, meaning, and sacredness from any specific archetype.”
(http://redsea1.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=2562581)
Thank you.

Yes, I do agree in what the Greeks and Romans did but also the Arabic terminology fits into this too. LIke the quote you posted, most of the comments show that there was no one name though, for all of the continent. I too believe that the root name in 'Africa' goes way back to pre-flood origins, but has been distorted.

Alkebulan is the oldest and the only word of indigenous origin
Bro CLyde, I acknowledge that you believe this.
 

Chevron Dove

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Then, which name would you accept or use, if you had to?

...
That is a good question.

The Bible today, refers to Israel being captive in Egypt and then uses other names for other parts such as Simon from Cyrene and etc. But the broadest term in the ancient scriptures translated today would be 'the land of Ham'.

In the American Protestant Movement, they refer to the continent as 'Africa' so, this is what I would use, however, I absolutely understand and agree to the term KEMET. But the term ALKEBULAN is not recognized, to my knowledge, even in African governments anywhere. So, while I agree with your research based on Dr. Ben and Dr. Nana from Ghana, I feel that this term needs to be acknowledge by Black AFrican government first. And because of the Arabic nature of its transliteration, I don't think that it will ever be widely accepted by Black AFrican leaders though. I believe they would accept the root terms though such as 'Kebu-lan' but not 'Al-kebulan', imo.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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That is a good question.
In the American Protestant Movement, they refer to the continent as 'Africa' so, this is what I would use...

No, the question was this, which indigenous name would you accept or use, if you had to; since no one name of the many cited, was the designated name for all the continent.
 

Chevron Dove

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No, the question was this, which indigenous name would you accept or use, if you had to; since no one name of the many cited, was the designated name for all the continent.
Again, based upon the Protestant Movement here, in America, and the Holy Bible, I agree with Jesus and the Holy Bible in that we should respect this GOVERNMENT and the word that is used and DESIGNATED for all the continent would be AFRICA.

I understand your question about 'indigenous name' but based upon, even the quotes you provided, there is none; other than the term ALKEBULAN of which, again by your own references, was used very late in time and connected to at least the 'White Arabs'. So I refer to the Bible and the GOSPEL in how we are to respect the government and therefore like the Creator even got on MOses about having to channel through the pharaoh, we should make our appeals through the system that God will check and judge one day, while we do our research. For instance, I appreciate Thurgood Marshall in how he caused this government to accept the term 'AFRICAN AMERICAN' as opposed to earlier terms when referring to the people of 'African descent' instead of calling us names such as 'Coloreds' or 'Negroes' and etc. But, I personally do NOT have a problem with Black, Colored, Negroe, Negress or etc. however, in the past some of these terms were defined as being derogatory at the time. I still use some terms in my research though. Therefore, again regarding the term 'ALKEBULAN' I don't see yet, where the leaders in the continent of Africa are using this term and I believe that is important in how we should regard this term. I believe that some of the Black African leaders in certain countries will never use that term because it is transliterated as being 'White Arabic' transliteration.

I don't know of any 'ONE NAME FOR ALL OF AFRICA' in ancient scripts but the closest term would be, imo, THE LAND OF HAM or KEMET, I suppose.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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...
Thank you... btw, have you written your book(s) yet?


...I don't know of any 'ONE NAME FOR ALL OF AFRICA' in ancient scripts but the closest term would be, imo, THE LAND OF HAM or KEMET, I suppose.
Again, based upon the Protestant Movement here, in America, and the Holy Bible, I agree with Jesus and the Holy Bible in that we should respect this GOVERNMENT and the word that is used and DESIGNATED for all the continent would be AFRICA.
 

Chevron Dove

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Not yet! LOL! But I am still planning to do just that real soon.

You know I love you dearly Bro. Clyde!
 

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