Black People : Al Sharpton Redefines Winning...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Aqil, Feb 10, 2004.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    By Alvin A. Reid
    ST. LOUIS AMERICAN

    ST. LOUIS - The Rev. Al Sharpton says his campaign for the presidency is about more than his actually winning the Democratic nomination. It's about ''redeeming the soul of this party,'' he thundered during a campaign appearance at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. ''The 2004 election is not just another election. It is about the future of the party, and the future of the nation.''

    Sharpton said a priority of the Democratic Party is getting Bush out of the White House. But another priority is how Bush ended up in there in the first place. ''We had too many elephants in donkey jackets,'' he said referring to Democrats who ''talk just like Republicans.''

    ''This is why I am in this race. People say, 'You can't win.' Seven candidates are running. So guess what? Six are gonna lose. Al Sharpton will not be the only one to lose,'' the candidate said to laughter from the audience. ''But if I can get votes we can't be ignored, we can't be marginalized. We can go to the Democratic National Convention and fight for the direction of the party.''

    Read the entire article at:

    http://www.thecharlottepost.com/news2.html
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Run Al Run...

    Of the nine presidential candidates who started out, four (Gephardt, Leiberman, Wesley Clark and Carol Moseley-Braun) have dropped out. Sharpton actually finished ahead of Howard Dean in one primary, and ahead of Dennis Kucinich in several. He at least deserves credit for trying to break up the "clubby, white-male pack" of Democratic presidential contenders, and trying to prod mainstream Democrats to do and say more on race and poverty issues...
     
  3. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You gotta be in it to win it...if you ain't in it, you can't win it... :cool:
     
  4. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sharpton's Motives for Support of Powell Questioned

    Powell Denies Racial Motivations Behind Sharpton's Support for His Campaign; Still Waiting to Decide on Bid for Congress

    By Carla Zanoni
    Spectator Staff Writer

    News of Al Sharpton's backing of Assemblyman Adam Clayton Powell IV's potential bid against United States Congressman Charles Rangel in the November 2004 Congressional race has raised some questions about the politics behind Sharpton's support, leading some to believe that, after Rangel's support of General Wesley Clark instead of Sharpton in the 2004 presidential campaign, Sharpton is attempting to strong-arm African-American politicians into only voting for African-American candidates. Rangel represents East and Central Harlem, the Upper West Side, and Washington Heights/Inwood in the in the U.S. House of Representatives.

    The New York Post reported last week that Sharpton was pushing for Powell to run against Rangel as reprisal for the congressman's support of presidential candidate General Wesley Clark. The story speculated that Sharpton, who is currently running for the Democratic nomination, is beginning to deliver on threats he made against political opponents in December 2003, when he stated that any local officials who did not support his bid for the presidency would "have to deal with the consequences." But Powell says there is no validity to that statement. He said he's supporting Sharpton because Sharpton has been there for Harlem.

    "Sharpton's reaction is not necessarily racially motivated," said Powell, who represents Manhattan's 68th Assembly District, including the Harlem area. "One of nine of the Democratic Presidential candidates is dedicated to this community. Eight out of nine will fly out of town after the election, forgetting the people in our neighborhood. Mr. Sharpton is here to stay."

    Read the entire article at:

    http://www.columbiaspectator.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/02/13/402c9dbb3fcbc
     
  5. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black political pundits want Sharpton to run race to the end...

    By Brian DeBose
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Black political pundits said even though the Rev. Al Sharpton has only a slim chance of getting the Democratic presidential nomination, he shouldn't abandon his campaign because he brings important issues of Black America to the national debates.

    Mr. Sharpton's grass-roots volunteer campaign has helped him finish no better than third in any of the races thus far, with third-place showings in South Carolina and Michigan. He has netted a total of 12 delegates to the Democratic National Convention, and the campaign was $348,451 in debt as of his last filing to the Federal Election Commission on Dec. 31.

    Nonetheless, the New York-based Pentecostal minister said he will not stop — "if I have to buy a pair of sneakers and walk" — until the July convention in Boston, partly because minority voters want him to stay in.

    Political consultants and analysts agree that Mr. Sharpton should stay in the race. "This is a battle of ideas, too, and when you get Sharpton in a debate, he raises issues that some of the other candidates would not even touch if he wasn't there," said Sam Riddle, chief executive officer of the Detroit-based political consulting firm Meridian Management Systems.
    Mr. Riddle, who was Jesse Jackson's state director for Michigan in his 1988 presidential bid, said Mr. Sharpton has a substantial voice in the debates and the national policy discussions in the news. "He brings the full breadth of the American experience; people often forget that when you are president you represent the whole country," Mr. Riddle said.

    Ron Walters, professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland, also said he sees no need for Mr. Sharpton to end his run for the White House. "I don't think he should drop out. He should stay because. even without delegates, he has an opportunity to bring some accountability, at the level of issues for the Black community," Mr. Walters said.

    Read the entire article at:

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/national/20040210-105704-1104r.htm
     
  6. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Ok, even though I don't care much for them, I guess politicians are here to stay so. . .

    This has been interesting reading material, Brother Aqil, thank you. I've learned a lot about what's involved when running a campaign and the political game that's played. The bottom line though, when you really get down to it, is the question that never seems to go away for me -- what broad impact will/can Sharpton have for Black Americans in the political arena? He might be good for Harlem, but what about the rest of us?

    I'm really stuck on this so I continue to bring it up. There's the issue of the voting process that continues to be extremely questionable. One vote, one count? Really? The Black and White issue during political campaigns keep people's attention on how racist America is and because no one else running for president seems to give a hoot about our issues now, why would I believe that they will if/when they become president? And what can they do without the majority support in Congress? Do or can they serve the masses or just a few who are owed political favors?

    People say Clinton was good for Black people and maybe he was but look at us yet again having to scuffle around, desperately trying to find someone who can get our issues effectively addressed in the U.S. political system. Better education, equal employment, proper healthcare, all things we want just as much as anyone yet along with that, Blacks have to deal with racism that plays a significant role in denying us these things.

    True, you can't win unless you're in the race, but when you have to run the race according to the rules that aren't in your favor, can you really make a difference if you win? I really wonder. I guess we won't know until a Black person actually wins the presidency and let's hope it's not Condaleeza or however she spells her name.

    Anyway, moving right along . . . this is still interesting information.

    Peace :spinstar:
     
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