Black People : Afrocentric School In Toronto Outperforms Rivals

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Amnat77, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,428
    Likes Received:
    2,620
    Occupation:
    professional.
    Location:
    UK..not for long
    Ratings:
    +2,622
    Africentric school shines: MacDonald

    By MOIRA MacDONALD, Toronto Sun

    The most scrutinized school in the Toronto District School Board has a very public feather in its cap — thanks to those dastardly provincial EQAO tests.

    The inaugural Grade 3 class of the Africentric Alternative School significantly outperformed both the board and the province in this year’s results.

    The school’s 16 Grade 3 students collectively had 69% of students reaching the provincial Level 3 standard in reading, 81% in writing and 81% in math. For the board, those scores sit at 60%, 70% and 71%. For all of Ontario, they’re 62%, 70% and 71%.

    Sure, it’s only the first year — and educators always caution it’s important to look at improvement over time. As well, the Africentric school’s 2009-10 class was a small one where even a few high-performing — or low-performing — students could significantly skew results.

    Still, it shows the Downsview-area school must be doing something right.

    It also proves what the black community already knows — black students are capable of high levels of achievement.

    “When you see achievement, both great and small, especially in the EQAO, it just provides another context for the reason why you need a school like the Africentric Alternative School,” says principal Thando Hyman, adding enrolment has doubled to 160 for the school’s second year.

    Was the school simply blessed with an already high-achieving crop of kids? Nope, she says.

    “The students really run the gamut … Some kids at the beginning of (last) year were having challenges in reading and so it really required ongoing consistent teaching and continual motivation,” says Hyman, adding the school “still has some work to do” in reading.

    High expectations, consistent routines, a strong sense of purpose based on African cultural principles that students are steeped in during daily opening exercises, after-school tutorials and close, caring attention by teachers are things Hyman believes have fuelled students’ success. With the TDSB battling a 40% dropout rate among black students, she thinks those factors can help students elsewhere do better too.

    In the city’s east end principal Glenn Boden credits extra professional development and staff collaboration time — bought by grants under a provincial education ministry struggling schools program — for his school’s dramatic improvements.

    Last year’s EQAO results at Cedarbrook Junior Public School were not so hot — see the above note on the hazards of looking at a single year. But since 2005 Grade 3 students’ Level 3 reading performance has shot from 32% to 62% and Grade 6, from 44% to 83%. Grade 3 math has gone from 29% to 76%; Grade 6 from 47% to 66%.

    “It’s not rocket science,” says Boden, whose school is in the Bellamy Rd.-Eglinton Ave. E. area. But, “it takes time, it takes planning and it takes (teacher) buy-in.”

    Cedarbrook is in the top third of the TDSB’s list of its neediest schools. Teachers meet regularly to analyze student test data and plan how they’ll collectively tackle weaknesses. They watch each other teach and have worked on getting their marking schemes in line with each other so they’re more standardized and less subjective.

    The school also set up a professional learning library where teachers can look up research on teaching and get students books aimed at improving specific academic skills.

    Last year staff targeted students performing immediately below the Level 3 standard and worked throughout the year to move them up a level.

    The results “surpassed our expectations,” says teacher Carri Brown.

    “We were really, really excited.”

    Two schools. Two successes. And one still-controversial test that allows those successes to shine.

    [email protected]

    http://www.torontosun.com/comment/columnists/moira_macdonald/2010/09/24/15469271.html
     
  2. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,428
    Likes Received:
    2,620
    Occupation:
    professional.
    Location:
    UK..not for long
    Ratings:
    +2,622
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    The Curiculum of Inclusion, proposed by State Regent Adelaid Sanford and Dr Leonard Jeffries, to be implemented in the NYC high school system was rejected inspite of the high scores,
    achieved by Afrocetric private schools across the city.

    ironicaly at the same time draconian measures were taken by City hall to dismantle the community school board sytem and local elections of local board heads and staff.

    They feared the input of the Black community and the power it would provide in making real changes and real achievement.

    However a national Black education think tank is needed in lieu of the scientific fact that a child's knowledge of their culture and history has an inestimatable effect on a benefiting child's self esteem.
     
  4. African_Prince

    African_Prince Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    48
    Ratings:
    +48
    I only skimmed through the article but this is really inspiring news. I live near Toronto.
     
  5. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,428
    Likes Received:
    2,620
    Occupation:
    professional.
    Location:
    UK..not for long
    Ratings:
    +2,622

    They day is at hand-all that's has been hidden will be laid bare for all to see... I want to see the rebuttal from the ''Black conservatives'' (frigging oxymoron) about this.....

    I mean.. could it be that black boys can learn and process information when they are not DRUGGED UP and are taught relevant information which feeds their spirit???

    nooooooooooooooo:SuN048:

    say it ain't so!!!!!
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    vAfrican centered education is an evolving liberatory project having a philosophy and practice informed by the 500-year history of unrelenting struggle waged by Africans in the Americas to first maintain and now recover and reconnect with the best of our African intellectual and cultural heritage. Among the 20th century pioneers in this movement, perhaps no one is more important than Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950). Dr. Woodson's major contributions include not only the establishment of Negro History Week (now Black History Month) in 1926, but also the 1933 publication of what remains the definitive critique of African American education, The Mis-Education of the Negro. Equally important are the pioneering school-building efforts of The Honorable Elijah Muhammad (1897-1975), founder of the Nation of Islam, who during the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, established dozens of independent, private African-Islamic schools for the children of his followers and supporters.1

    Ascending on the sweet winds of freedom that criss-cross the African World, the youth who energized the U.S.-based Civil Rights/Black Consciousness movements of the 1960s and 70s began to realize in varying degrees that a different type of education was imperative if African Americans were to elevate their group status in American society and the world. In such ideological disparate formations as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) at one end of the political continuum and the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (BPPSD) and the Congress of Afrikan People (CAP) at the other, there was a growing awareness among the youth that African Americans had not only been politically and economically disenfranchised by the ruling elites, but educationally disenfranchised as well.

    Further politicized as much by Kwame Ture's (Stokely Carmichael) clarion call for Black Power in 1966 as by the assassinations of El-Hajj Malik Omowale El-Shabazz (Malcolm X) in 1965 and Martin Luther King Jr., in 1968, these student activist established what were known in the African American community as freedom or liberation schools, in part inspired by SNCC school-building efforts in rural Mississippi initiated earlier in the decade.

    At these schools, PE (political education) classes, as the Black Panthers called them, routinely included readings in and discussion of African and African American history and culture. Three of the most successful Northern freedom schools of this period were the Freedom Library Day School, established in 1968 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by John Churchville, Uhuru Sasa Shule, established in 1970 in Brooklyn, New York by Jitu Weusi and the African Students Association, and the Oakland, California-based, BPPSD-operated Intercommunal Youth Institute, established in 1971.2

    These efforts at re-centering and politicizing African American education represented not only a growing community demand for schools offering a historically-inclusive and culturally-affirming education for African American children, but led to the establishment of the Council of Independent Black Institutions (CIBI) in 1972. As the premier association of Pan African nationalist educators, school administrators, and parents committed to developing counter hegemonic curricula and pedagogies for Africans in America and around the world, the creation of CIBI institutionalized this shift in educational vision from cultural assimilation to cultural nationalism.3

    During the 1970s and 1980s, CIBI-affiliated African centered shules (schools) sprung up in nearly every major American city with a significant African American population. Washington, DC and Pasadena, California are the homes of two of the better-known CIBI institutions, NationHouse Watoto and Omowale Ujamaa, respectively. Many of these enterprises, like the two just mentioned, have grown into full-time operations.4

    The 1990s have witnessed the internationalization of African centered educational theory and its embrace by increasing numbers of African educators and parents both in the U.S. and abroad. Advocates are impressed with the high self-esteem, wholesome social values, and abundant academic skills of African centered students, and depressed by the public schools' half-hearted efforts, lack-luster commitment, in short, dismal failure at unlocking and then developing the genius potential of African American learners.



    Guiding Principles

    [sankofa] There are five key concepts essential to the African centered perspective in education. First, African centered education is immersed in sankofa. Sankofa is an Akan principle which in African centered education means to reach back, bring forward, and reconnect African students and their communities with the best of those life-enriching philosophical principles and community-building cultural practices that sustained for thousands of years what Agyei Akoto calls the "classical African civilizations" of Kemet (Egypt), Nubia, Axum and Meroe 5, as well as the Yoruba, Asante, Zulu, Gikuyu, Dogon and other traditional societies in Africa and around the world.

    One life-giving principle resurrected from the ancient Nile Valley cultures embraced by African centered educators is ma'at, which means not only justice, but also truth, righteousness, order, harmony, reciprocity and balance. According to Maulana Karenga, ma'at was the "heart of Kemetic ethics and spiritual striving;" today it is the "soul" of African centered pedagogical theory and practice.6 As an emancipatory and humanistic enterprise whose terminal objective is the empowerment of African people who will restore ma'at to human affairs, African centered education seeks no hegemony over others, but only a "pluralism without hierarchy" where the African centered idea would take its rightful place, "one perspective beside many."7

    Next, African centered perspectives in education aspires to provide African students and their communities with the cognitive and affective tools required to reconstruct the African World and end the maafa. Maafa is a Swahili word meaning "disaster," and is usually associated with the African Holocaust, or the past five centuries of European and Arab orchestrated destruction of traditional African societies and subsequent devastation of indigenous African people first through enslavement and colonialism, then segregation and apartheid, and now miseducation and genocide. The reign of terror - resulting in the deaths of tens of millions - unleashed by Europe alone against African people is without precedence in the annals of human history.8 Among the warriors in the struggle to end the maafa and restore ma'at, African centered education is the weapon of choice.

    Operating on the premise that all true education begins with and is centered in self-knowledge, and therefore is autocentric, African centered education relocates African students and their communities to the center of the educational process for elevation and then placement back on to what Marimba Ani calls "our ancestral power base."9 Education is meant to be empowering, and to be so it must be rooted in the history, traditions, and culture of the people it is intended to serve. As a refocusing and relocative vehicle, African centered education re-positions African students and their communities not to the margins of the educational enterprise as does the prevailing eurocentric view, but to the very heart of the teaching and the learning.

    Lastly, African centered education in the American context is unabashedly nationalistic, and thus committed to the intergenerational transmission of nationalist theory and practice. Though it rejects the assimilationist outcomes inherent in mainstream American education, it is not isolationist or exclusionary. It is Pan African and global. In a pluralistic, capitalistic society like the United States, each nationality must organize its members to advance their group interest or risk being the victims of those who do. At the same time each nationality must cooperate with others for the good of the larger whole.

    www.zimbio.com
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    Thanks for sharing, Amnat....News like this warms the heart.
     
  8. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,428
    Likes Received:
    2,620
    Occupation:
    professional.
    Location:
    UK..not for long
    Ratings:
    +2,622
    [
    You seen this? it was taken off utube..wonder why...

    http://www.facebook.com/#!/video/video.php?v=1405221897148
     
  9. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
  10. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2004
    Messages:
    5,642
    Likes Received:
    3,328
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +3,382
    Sort of reminds me of the 11th dynasty in Kemet...for it was only "AFTER" they kicked out the "CLEAR PEOPLE" that their sciences and everything else began to once again rise to higher levels.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Afrocentric School Toronto
  1. phynxofkemet
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    2,734
  2. Ankhur
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    3,269
  3. Zulile
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,031
  4. river
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,596
  5. Isaiah
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    2,355